Implementing e-Navigation

Implementing e-Navigation

by John Erik Hagen

Hardcover

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Overview

This one-of-a-kind new resource, written by an expert in the field, provides a comprehensive introduction to global e-navigation. This book presents the vision, development, and objectives of this strategy to increase awareness, safety, and security in the navigation of commercial shipping. Current equipment and practices of maritime navigation are discussed including ship reporting, shore based services, communications, and challenges in vessel travel services (VTS) and port areas. This book identifies performance gaps and demonstrates how to identify user needs as well as solutions through gap analysis. E-navigation architectures, solutions, and standards are explored.

Readers find useful insight into how new concepts of e-navigation are being adapted internationally and some of the difficulties that will need to be overcome. This resource focuses on the use of e-navigation in security, cyber security, environmental protection, communications, and global and technical standardization. Navigation equipment, systems, displays, bridge systems, and other current equipment and practices are explored in this book. Readers get a look into the future of e-navigation, including the impact that digital globalization, unmanned ships, and big data will have on this strategy.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781630810993
Publisher: Artech House, Incorporated
Publication date: 08/31/2017
Pages: 220
Product dimensions: 6.50(w) x 1.50(h) x 9.50(d)

About the Author

John Erik Hagen is regional director at the Norwegian Coastal Administration. He pursued a career in the Norwegian Navy, attending office training school and received his degree from the Norwegian Defence University College. He has served as coordinator of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) Correspondence Group and chairman of the IMO working groups on e-navigation.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix

1 Introduction to e-Navigation 1

1.1 What Is e-Navigation? 1

1.2 The Vision of e-Navigation 3

1.3 Development of e-Navigation 4

1.3.1 The e-Navigation Concept 4

1.3.2 e-Navigation Is a Collective Task 7

1.3.3 Approaches toward a Global e-Navigation System 8

1.3.4 Industry's Role 11

1.3.5 Ownership of e-Navigation 14

1.3.6 Concerns about e-Navigation 17

1.4 Aims and Objectives of e-Navigation 19

1.4.1 Safety Including Reducing Accidents 19

1.4.2 Efficiency and Reduced Costs 21

1.4.3 Use of e-Navigation in Security 21

1.4.4 Use of e-Navigation and Cybersecurity 23

1.4.5 Protection of the Environment 26

1.4.6 Global and Technical Standardization 29

1.4.7 Communications 31

1.4.8 Training and Familiarization 33

2 Maritime Navigation: Current Equipment and Practices 37

2.1 Navigational Equipment Systems, Displays, and Bridge Systems 37

2.2 Ship Reporting and Shore-Based Services 47

2.3 Communications and Interoperability 53

2.4 Challenges in VTS and Port Areas 58

3 Performance Gaps 65

3.1 Identifying User Needs 65

3.2 Gap Analysis 76

3.3 Solutions Identified by the Gap Analysis 81

3.4 e-Navigation Development by IHO and IALA 85

3.4.1 IHO 85

3.4.2 IALA 89

4 e-Navigation Solutions 93

4.1 Introduction to e-Navigation Solutions 93

4.2 Further Development 94

4.2.1 Solution 1: Harmonization of Bridge Design 94

4.2.2 Solution 2: Means for Standardized and Automatic Ship Reporting 95

4.2.3 Solution 3: Improved Reliability, Resilience, and Integrity of Bridge Equipment and Navigation Information 96

4.2.4 Solution 4: Integration and Presentation of Available Information in Graphical Displays Received via Communication Equipment 96

4.2.5 Solution 5: MSPs 97

4.3 Examples of Implementing e-Navigation 102

4.3.1 Canada 102

4.3.2 The United States 106

4.3.3 Norway 112

4.3.4 Australia 117

4.4 Expectations of Maritime Equipment Manufacturers 122

4.5 Communications 128

4.6 The Link 131

5 Standards 135

5.1 The IMO Process 135

5.1.1 Royal Majesty 140

5.2 e-Navigation Choices of Standards and Guidelines 143

5.2.1 Adding New Modules to the Revised Performance Standards for INSs (Resolution MSC.252 (83) Adoption of the Revised Performance Standards for Integrated Navigation Systems (INS)) 146

5.2.2 Draft Guidelines on Standardized Modes of Operation 147

5.2.3 Revision of the Guidelines and Criteria for Ship Reporting Systems (Resolution MSC.43(64)) 148

5.2.4 Revision of the General Requirements for Shipborne Radio Equipment Forming Part of the GMDSS and for Electronic Navigational Aids (Resolution A.684(17)) 150

5.2.5 Draft Guidelines for the Harmonized Display of Navigation Information Received via Communications Equipment 151

5.2.6 MSPs 152

5.3 Carriage Requirements for e-Navigation 155

6 The Future 159

6.1 Introduction to the Future 159

6.2 Digital Globalization 160

6.3 Challenges 163

6.4 Ships, Ports, and VTSs in the Future 165

6.4.1 Future VTS 168

6.4.2 The Future Port 169

6.5 Moving e-Navigation Onboard and Ashore 171

6.6 Skills and Training 175

6.7 Unmanned Ships 178

6.8 Big Data 180

6.9 Managing the Environmental Impact of Shipping 183

6.10 Presenting the Future 188

About the Author 193

Index 195

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