In Stitches

In Stitches

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781451608441
Publisher: Gallery Books
Publication date: 04/26/2011
Pages: 288
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Anthony Youn, M.D. is a board certified plastic surgeon who focuses on cosmetic surgery. He has been featured on The Rachael Ray Show, Dr. 90210, CNN, The Montel Williams Show, America’s Newsroom on the Fox News Channel, The O’Reilly Factor, the E! Special Celebrity Plastic Surgery, and others. His comments have been featured in US Weekly, In Touch, Life and Style Weekly, RADAR magazine, MSNBC, OK! magazine, The National Enquirer, Star, The Detroit Free Press, The Detroit News, and the Minneapolis Star-Tribune. He’s very active on his website: InStitchesBook.com.

Table of Contents

Prologue: The Face in the Ceiling 1

I Premed 7

1 Karate Kid 9

2 Jawzilla 21

3 Zero for Four Years 33

II First Year 59

4 Little Asia 61

5 Master of the Shopping Cart 69

6 A Show of Hands 85

7 Nerd Room 93

III Second Year 111

8 Flower Street 113

9 No, But I Play One on TV 123

10 Second-Year Crush 133

IV Third Year 149

11 First Do No Harm … Oops 151

12 Role Model 165

13 "Miracle of Birth Occurs for 83 Billionth Time!" 175

14 If You Don't Cut, You Suck 183

15 Shrink Rap 197

16 This Is Spinal Tap 203

17 Mommy Dearest 213

V Fourth Year 223

18 Thanksgiving Story 225

19 Beverly Hills Bloodsuckers 237

20 Monkey Time! 255

21 Match Madness 263

Acknowledgments 269

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In Stitches 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The best book about medical school and becoming a doctor that I have ever read, and one of the best memoirs (and I've read a ton of them.) As the jacket says, it's a mash up of Sedaris and Scrubs. There are both funny (laugh out loud) and touching moments. A great page turner, and the kind of quick, easy read I enjoy. There are also interesting cultural aspects to the book (Dr. Youn is a Korean-American who grew up in rural MI and had a "Tiger Father.") Let's you experience med school -- all of the joy and pain -- without paying tuition or studying all those hours. A great book on many levels.
code7r More than 1 year ago
Anthony Youn grew up as a first generation Korean-American in a small town. Living in a household that was steeped in Korean heritage, but living in an American town, Mr. Youn definitely had an interesting childhood. This book touches on his childhood and the journey he took to become a doctor. It is funny and Mr. Youn will be the first person to make fun of himself. He looks back on his journey fondly and it comes through. One of the things I didn't like is how the first half of the book Mr. Youn focused on the fact he couldn't get a girlfriend. We get hit over the head with that fact. Really hit over the head. It detracted from the other parts of his story. I wish Mr. Youn would have had included his siblings more when he speaks about his childhood. His older brother, Mike, gets mentioned a few times but we never get a feel about how he and his younger brother, Anthony, got along and how they braved the small town they lived in together. If Mr. Youn treats his writing like he did getting his medical degree, then I am sure that we will be seeing more of his stories in print. That would be great, but please leave out the part about not having a girlfriend. *I received this book as a winner in the Goodreads book giveaway, that in no way affects the content of my review.*
BookHounds More than 1 year ago
I have read several books about students and their path to becoming a doctor, but the one Anthony Youn wrote about his path is by far the best of the bunch. I read this is one night and didn't want the stories to end! I am now demanding a sequel about his stories, both heartwarming and humorous in his next journey of being a plastic surgeon. I had no idea he was on so many television programs, but now that I know his name and looked at a few You Tube videos, I am going to start checking out this personable physician. My favorite story in the book is about why he wanted to become a doctor and how his answer never strayed from the fact that he wanted to help people and get laid. Yes, he actually said that and I laughed out loud. He thought that being a doctor would make him more attractable to women! Youn's thoughts cover a broad range of thoughts, like what it is like to be a real minority, have parents that make you do more than you think you are capable of and the importance of having a sense of humor. His sense of humor is evident throughout the book and he likes to poke fun at himself. I was really impressed that his path to becoming a plastic surgeon was built upon his own triumph of having surgery to correct his jaw which did not stop growing and caused a massive underbite. The fact that he understands deformity leads him to connect with his patients on a personal level and makes him that much better a doctor. There is truly a "Scrubs" type element when he writes about his internship and school years and it is amazing that anyone in this country ever becomes a doctor at all with all of the long hours they endure.
kp24 More than 1 year ago
Great book. Was hard to put down. Great sense of humor to it.Hope there is a sequel!!
YounFan More than 1 year ago
A self described nerd that can't get a date not only through high school, but even as he begins med school! He is successful in all classes but can't figure out what he wants to do "when he grows up" until one night when his passion is revealed to him. You'll love reading this book and you'll love Dr. Youn. He's the doctor we all wish we had. Don't miss this fun, easy read. You'll want to pass it along to all of your friends!
CarrieDCD More than 1 year ago
This book is both lighthearted, yet poignant. The book takes you through Dr. Youn's maturity process where one of his focuses early in his life is the same as many young men - being cool and gettin' the girls. Why does he want to become a doctor - outside of his father's insistence? To get the women - right?! As he continues his journey, however, he is jolted into the realities of why God has called him to become a plastic surgeon. Readers learn that Dr. Youn's compassion, commitment to practice, hard work, faith, passion, humor, and perserverance were, and continue to be, key ingredients in his success.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This story will inspire all the dreamers and underdogs in life. It's like the movie "Rudy" except funnier with a stronger romantic arc. Recommended for everyone!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A hospital employee who rubs shoulders with physicians all day, I appreciate the men and women that deliver care to our patients. The hard work and sacrifice it takes to become a doc is inspirational, and I enjoyed the inside story contained in the book. There's a sentimental reverence for the places and people that mady Anthony even with occassional good natured jabs. The author's gratitude comes through and makes the story endearing. Finally the father and son tension is a universal that all men will recognize, and this underlying element carries the book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a book by Dr. Anthony Youn, a celebrity plastic surgeon. I never expected a book like this. It is so funny! I read it on a plane and the people next to me thought I was insane, as I kept cracking up! It has some touching scenes too, especially between Dr. Youn and his strict, hard-line Korean father. It's the best doctor book I've ever read. I hope he writes a follow-up.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a memoir about becoming a doctor written by Dr. Anthony Youn, a plastic surgeon often seen on the Rachael Ray Show. It's a fast, great read. I read it in two days, and laughed out loud many times. Who knew a doctor, much less a plastic surgeon, has such a sense of humor? Highly recommended for anyone wondering what it's like to become a doctor, go through medical school, or grow up looking and feeling different.
akreese on LibraryThing 7 months ago
In Stitches is a great book to read if you have ever wondered what life is like in medical school. Anthony Youn takes the reader on a quick tour of his childhood years and then delves into the study-filled days and nights of life as a medical student.During those years of college, his obsessions seemed to be split equally between his studies and his desire to find a girl who would stick around long enough for a second date (or even make it to the end of the first one). His self-deprecating humor can be a little over the top at times, but serves as a good contrast to the seriousness with which he addressed his studies.The parts of the memoir that I enjoyed the most were those where the author discussed his passion for plastic surgery, and how he discovered that passion. When someone feels that strongly about something their enthusiasm shines through when they talk about it and it is contagious.I didn¿t know that much about the process that medical students go through (I¿m not a fan of medical TV dramas, so that might have something to do with my ignorance), so Anthony Youn¿s stories of his harrowing first year of study, the actors paid to pretend illnesses for the students to diagnose, and his time on rotations after that were informative and entertaining.I know I shouldn¿t have been surprised at how much work was involved, or how quickly the students get thrown into the fire when it comes to treating and diagnosing patients, but the harshness of the learning environment was shocking. For example, on his first day of rotations he is told to draw blood with no previous experience or training. ¿Do the draw,¿ she says to me. ¿As I mentioned a moment ago¿¿ ¿Do the draw! We don¿t have all day.¿ Hands shaking, mouth dry and tasting of paste, I fumble with the needle kit she hands me. Word of advice. When you¿ve got a razor-sharp implement in your hand and your job is to puncture someone¿s flesh, take your time. Not great to search for a vein when you¿re on the clock. Page 155Which brings me to another point ¿ there is a decent amount of swearing in this book. I didn¿t find it horribly offensive or anything, but it¿s there (a point of which I was reminded when searching for the above quote, and had a hard time finding a way to excerpt it without including profanity).The chapter about the third year rotations made me wonder if there wasn¿t possibly a better way to initiate medical students into the actual hands-on portion of doctoring. It also made me want to steer clear of hospitals with medical students, and reaffirmed my belief that I made the right decision in pursuing a degree in the liberal arts. I enjoyed this book and would love to read more about Anthony Youn¿s subsequent years of training to become a plastic surgeon, and his experiences in the profession thereafter.
tibobi on LibraryThing 7 months ago
The Short of It: Funny, entertaining and even touching at times, In Stitches is proof that you can still have a sense of humor while completing medical school. The Rest of It: Memoirs are not my thing, but I had aspirations when I was young and yes, those aspirations had to do with me becoming a doctor. Anyone who knows me in real life knows how obsessed I am with the medical field. I mean, when you have some strange, undiagnosed illness that everyone calls ¿Lupus¿ you tend to do a little reasearch on your own. That said, I was fascinated with this book. Anthony, I¿ll call him Tony, starts the book off with his very strict, Asian upbringing. I had close friends with parents like his and yes¿they both became doctors (in case you were wondering). It¿s obvious that Tony¿s family is a very loving, caring family but his parents are very clear on what they want for their son and what they want is for him to be a doctor. Not only a doctor, but a surgeon because as his dad tells him, ¿surgeons make more dallah. ¿ Tony¿s adolescence is wrought with angst. He¿s not a bad-looking guy, but he¿s a little geeky and awkward around the girls. Much of the book is him lusting over pretty girls. This was my least favorite part of the book. Unfortunately, the lusting period carries over to college where there is more awkwardness and near-misses with girls. BUT, Tony¿s ability to make fun of himself is admirable. Not everyone can do that and his willingness to do it, is what kept me reading. Once he got to his rotations at the hospital I was hooked. Nurses with attitude, patients with hang-ups, and beeper humor. Lots of beeper humor. It¿s been so long since I¿ve even seen a beeper, that I completely forgot that they contained actual messages. His rotations and the process he went through to get his residency were my favorites parts of the book. It seemed as if he ¿came into his own¿ and really figured out who he was. He became the ¿Tony¿ that he always wanted to be, and I was glad for him. As a writer, Tony is pretty funny. I had no trouble zipping through the pages and I really feel as if I got to know him. His writing is engaging and he has an open, honest way of speaking. I really enjoyed it.
zibilee on LibraryThing 7 months ago
In this introspective and witty memoir, Anthony Youn, a young Korean doctor, shares the passage of his life from early childhood and adolescence to his frantic foray through medical school, culminating in his residency in plastic surgery. Though Anthony is a smart youngster and a dedicated student, he¿s not very popular with his classmates during his formative years. Adding to this problem is the unending pressure from his father, a Korean immigrant who has become a successful obstetrician. After graduating high school at the top of his class, Anthony decides to go on to medical school at the urgings of his father. Despite the fact that he¿s not sure he wants to be a surgeon or doctor, Anthony does exceedingly well in medical school and is also able to make a handful of cherished friends who go through the ups and downs together with him.But what¿s most pressing to Anthony isn¿t the demands of medical school, but the fact that he can¿t get a date to save his life. With the help of his more smooth and suave friends, Anthony finally finds himself at peace within a very successful relationship. But as year four of medical school continues, Anthony¿s choice for a surgical residency is still up in the air. He works a bit in each field but finds himself unimpressed by all of them, until one life-changing evening when he finds himself at the elbow of one of the country¿s most successful plastic surgeons.Now Anthony is on a mission across the United States, learning from and practicing with some of the most renowned and eccentric plastic surgeons in an effort to complete his education and make himself eligible for residency. As he moves through the medical world, he shares his joys and failures, and comes to understand that his father¿s wish for him is not so far from his own dreams. Both candid and funny, In Stitches shares Anthony¿s journey from unpopular obscurity to the halls of medical artistry, and the choices he must make to get there.This was a rather strange read for me. Though I¿ve read quite a few memoirs, In Stitches was surprising because of its very brisk pace. I wanted to know more about Youn¿s life, and from my perspective, it seemed like he glossed over things rather quickly. Though I admit that in writing the book this way the action was fast paced, I couldn¿t help but feel like the story of Youn¿s life was rushed. This breakneck pace had the curious effect of distancing me from the narrator instead of drawing me closer. Though so much was packed within the first few sections, I felt like I didn¿t know him at all, which was the lamentable result of Youn¿s fast-paced style.Though I liked Youn, I found at times that he could be faintly misogynistic and sneering about women. This may have been because he was bitter about not getting any action, but the implications of his discussions about dating unattractive women in an effort to have sex just rubbed me the wrong way and made me feel a bit indisposed towards him. A lot of the first few sections were given over to his endless cogitation about his sexual urges and his attempts to get in a girl¿s, any girl¿s, pants. I ended up feeling that Youn was very immature, even in his reflections and digressions, and it bothered me that so much of his story revolved around his not being able to get lucky. I worried that the whole scope of this book was going to be self-absorbed and whiny, but luckily, when we moved into the second year of his medical schooling, things got a lot more interesting.When Youn finally got a girlfriend and put his angst to rest, there were, at last, some interesting developments in the book. As he takes us on a tour of what it was like for him in medical school, the story rapidly picked up flavor and my interest. Here are the tales that I had been waiting for. The arrogant and insensitive doctors, the troubled and ill patients. Youn shares his reflections on the first surgery he attends and its unexpected outcome. He relates his experiences about being on
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have a high interest in going into medical school and becoming a doctor myself... So, I bought a hard cover of this book assuming from the summary, reviews, and what Youn, himself, said about his book during an interview, I expected it to be an actual MEMOIR on Youn going through medical school, the problems he has encountered, how his career has been so far, etc. However, half way through the book I realized this was NOT a complete memoir at all.. My impression on this book was that this was written by a typical, horny male that cannot get laid during more than half of the book. I did finish reading the book, though. Even though I was not pleased with how I waisted my money. I would give this book zero stars, but I cannot lie. I thoroughly enjoyed the parts of the book that actually talked about the suspense in getting into the medical school he wanted, his medical school's orientation, a certain exam he had to pass, his first internship in the hospital, the difficulty in finding a residential internship he wanted to work in, etc. That is the only reason why this book deserves one star. However, I recommend that if you are looking for a REAL memoir on being in the medical field, do not waste your money.
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TiBookChatter More than 1 year ago
Memoirs are not my thing, but I had aspirations when I was young and yes, those aspirations had to do with me becoming a doctor. Anyone who knows me in real life knows how obsessed I am with the medical field. I mean, when you have some strange, undiagnosed illness that everyone calls "Lupus" you tend to do a little reasearch on your own. That said, I was fascinated with this book. Anthony, I'll call him Tony, starts the book off with his very strict, Asian upbringing. I had close friends with parents like his and yes.they both became doctors (in case you were wondering). It's obvious that Tony's family is a very loving, caring family but his parents are very clear on what they want for their son and what they want is for him to be a doctor. Not only a doctor, but a surgeon because as his dad tells him, "surgeons make more dallah. " Tony's adolescence is wrought with angst. He's not a bad-looking guy, but he's a little geeky and awkward around the girls. Much of the book is him lusting over pretty girls. This was my least favorite part of the book. Unfortunately, the lusting period carries over to college where there is more awkwardness and near-misses with girls. BUT, Tony's ability to make fun of himself is admirable. Not everyone can do that and his willingness to do it, is what kept me reading. Once he got to his rotations at the hospital I was hooked. Nurses with attitude, patients with hang-ups, and beeper humor. Lots of beeper humor. It's been so long since I've even seen a beeper, that I completely forgot that they contained actual messages. His rotations and the process he went through to get his residency were my favorites parts of the book. It seemed as if he "came into his own" and really figured out who he was. He became the "Tony" that he always wanted to be, and I was glad for him. As a writer, Tony is pretty funny. I had no trouble zipping through the pages and I really feel as if I got to know him. His writing is engaging and he has an open, honest way of speaking. I really enjoyed it.