In the Arms of Stone Angels

In the Arms of Stone Angels

by Jordan Dane

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Product Details

BN ID: 2940156082858
Publisher: Jordan Dane
Publication date: 10/27/2018
Sold by: Draft2Digital
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 889 KB

About the Author

Bestselling, critically-acclaimed author Jordan Dane’s gritty thrillers are ripped from the headlines with vivid settings, intrigue, and dark humor. Publishers Weekly compared her intense novels to Lisa Jackson, Lisa Gardner, and Tami Hoag, naming her debut novel NO ONE HEARD HER SCREAM as Best Books of 2008. She also pens young-adult novels for Harlequin Teen. Formerly an energy sales manager, she writes full time and shares her Texas residence with two lucky rescue dogs.

Read an Excerpt

Charlotte, North Carolina

Two nights before Mom kidnapped me and screwed up my summer, she told me I was going with her. I didn't want to go back to Oklahoma, but she said I was too young to stay home alone. The real truth was that she didn't trust me. I'd given her plenty of reasons to feel that way. And I had the razor scars to prove it. After she told me, I screamed into her face until I shook all over.

"You never listen. When are you gonna stop blaming me for what happened?" I wanted to throw something. Anything! Instead I turned my back on her and headed for my room.

"You come back here, Brenna. We're not done." My mom yelled after me, but I knew she wouldn't follow.

Not this time.

My heart was pounding and my face felt swollen and hot. I had been out of control and couldn't stop my rage. And when I got in my mother's face, I had seen myself yelling like I was outside my body. From behind my eyes—in the heat of the moment—I usually don't remember much. But this time I was outside looking down. And I saw my mom's disappointment.

I knew she was afraid of me—and for me. And I still couldn't stop.

I'm a freak. I'm toxic. I don't know how to change and I'm not sure I want to. When I got to my room, I slammed my door so hard that a framed photo of my dead grandmother fell off a wall in the hallway. The glass shattered into a million pieces.

I didn't clean it up.

I wouldn't.

In my bathroom, I puked until I had nothing left but dry heaves. Whenever I felt like everything was out of control—that my life wasn't my own—that's when I usually hurled. I knew getting sick wasn't normal, but I didn't care. I refused to let Mom in on my little self-inflicted wound. I didn't want the attention.

When I went to bed that night, I wanted to be alone, but I felt my mom in the house. Hiding in the dark of my bedroom wasn't enough. And when the tears came, I couldn't stand being inside anymore. I slipped out my window in my boxers and tank top, like I usually do, and ran into the open field behind my house toward the old cemetery.

I didn't make it to the stone angels.

I ran, screaming, until my throat hurt. I knew no one would come and no one could hear me, but I wasn't sure anyone would care if I kept running. When I finally dropped to my knees, I collapsed onto my back and stared up into the stars. My chest was heaving and sweat poured off my body, making the cuts on my bare legs sting. Brambles and weeds had torn up my skin, but the pain wasn't enough. It was never enough.

My mom had given me no choice. In two days, we'd drive back to Shawano, a town in Oklahoma that I couldn't leave fast enough when I was fourteen.

Just thinking about going back—even after two years—made me sick. I couldn't catch my breath, no matter how hard I tried. I was dizzy and my chest hurt real bad. And when I thought I would die, I was surprised at how hard I fought to breathe. I had to think about something else, to stop from getting sick again.

That's when my thoughts turned to White Bird and I pictured his face the way I remembered him from before. Seeing him in my mind calmed me even though being involved with him back then had gotten me into trouble. People in Shawano already saw both of us as losers. And my turning him in to Sheriff Logan didn't change that.

In fact, it made things worse. The sheriff connected the dots and interrogated me as an accomplice. He just didn't understand how wrong he was.

Reporting the murder had torn me apart. I couldn't believe White Bird, a boy I trusted with everything that I was, could do such a thing. Seeing him that day made me question everything I believed about him. And I'd never seen a dead body before. The sight had terrified me. I had to tell what I saw. I couldn't just walk away and pretend it didn't happen. But in the seconds it took me to call 911—trying to do the right thing—my life would change forever. And there was no way for me to know how bad it would get.

After the sheriff cleared me, I was released and never charged, but that didn't mean I was innocent in the eyes of everyone in town. And it didn't mean my mom wouldn't feel the pain of guilt by association. Her real estate business dried up and I knew she blamed me.

I never liked that boy. Now look what you've done.

I heard her words over and over in my head. And I can still see the look in my grandmother's eyes the day we left Oklahoma and moved to North Carolina. I talked to my grandmother on the phone plenty, but I heard it in her voice. Even Grams had lost faith and she died not believing in me. Not even the stone angels gave me comfort the day she left this world behind. And when I didn't go to her funeral—because I believed Grams wouldn't want me there—I think my mother was relieved.

Now my mom had to settle my grandmother's estate and get her old house ready to sell. At least that's what she gave me as the reason we had to drive back. I'm not sure I believed her. I was more convinced that she wanted to torture me for what I had done to her life, too.

Lying on my back in the field, I stared into the universe and its gazillion winks of light and made a pact that I would never lie to the stars or make promises I wouldn't keep. Whatever I promised under the night sky should be honest and true because stars were ancient beings that watched over the planet. They wouldn't judge me. Every star was a soul who had died and broken free after they'd learned the lesson they had been born to master.

Me? I was in remedial class. I had more than a lifetime to go. Plus I had a feeling some Supreme Being had me in detention, too. So, speaking the truth, I had to admit that a part of me wanted to go back and see what had happened to White Bird.

But a darker, scarier part wished I'd been the one he had killed under that bridge. And that was the honest to God truth.

Three Days Later on I- 40—Morning

"You hungry? There's a truck stop ahead. We can get some breakfast."

My mother's voice jarred me. On day two of our trip, I'd been staring out the car window watching nothing but fence posts, scrub brush and billboards fade into early-morning oblivion. Not even my fascination with friggin' roadkill had brought me out of my waking coma. And I hadn't spoken much to Mom since she'd told me about this road trip to hell.

"Whatever." I mumbled so she'd have to ask me what I'd said.

She never did.

Mom filled up the tank of our Subaru and pulled in front of a small truck stop cafe. Inside, the place smelled like cigarette smoke and old grease. And as I expected, everyone stared at me. I was used to it. I wasn't your average Abercrombie girl. I didn't wear advertising brand names on my body.

It was a life choice. A religion.

I got my clothes from Dumpster diving and Goodwill, anything I could stitch together that would make my own statement. Today I wore a torn jean jacket over a sundress with leggings that I'd cut holes into. And I had a plaid scarf draped around my neck with a cap pulled down on my head. My "screw you" toes were socked away in unlaced army boots. And I hid behind a huge pair of dark aviator sunglasses, a signature accessory and only one in a weird collection I carried with me. I liked the anonymity of me seeing out when no one saw in.

The overall impact was that I looked like an aspiring bag lady. A girl's got to have goals.

In short, I didn't give a shit about fitting in with the masses and it showed. I'd given up the idea of fitting in long ago. The herd mentality wasn't for me. And since I made things up as I went, people staring came with the territory. Mom picked a spot by a window and I shuffled my boots behind her and slid into the booth.

I grabbed a menu on the table and pretended to look at it while I played with my split ends.

"Do you have to do that here?"

"Do what?"

Neither one of us expected an answer.

I seriously hated my hair. It was long, thin and stringy, like me. A washed-out blond color that bordered on red. In the frickin' sun I looked like my damned head was on fire.

"You ready to order?" The waitress didn't even pretend to smile.

I asked for nachos with chili and my mom ordered a salad and coffee. Neither of us had a firm grasp of the term breakfast. It was one of the few things we had in common. While we waited for our food, Mom opened a valve to her stream of consciousness. Guess the quiet drive made her feel entitled to cut loose. And her talkative mood didn't change after we got our order. She jumped from one topic to another with her one-sided conversation, spewing words into the void like people do on Twitter.

Me? I scribbled in a spiral notebook while she talked. I always had a notepad stuffed in my knapsack and a collection of old notes piled in my closet back in North Carolina. Whenever I got an idea for clothes I wanted to make or a line of poetry or a lyric that got stuck in my head and wouldn't come out until I wrote it down, that's what usually went on paper. All I was working on now was a layered hoodie skirt thingee that was beginning to look an awful lot like a Snuggie. It looked like crap, but I probably wasn't drawing it right. Maybe Dana would wear it.

My only real friend in NC was Dana Biggers, who'd been texting me. She was okay, tolerable even. I hadn't written her back. She was asking too many questions about my trip and I didn't want to explain it, thinking I might tell her too much. I'd worked hard at keeping my old life in Oklahoma a mystery. I had wanted to reinvent myself and start over. Texting her back might ruin that, so I didn't. She'd get over it.

Dana was Wiccan and she practiced magic 24/7. Because of her, I got a B- in biology this term. It was the only class we shared, so I figured she had the goods if she could deliver one shining moment in a lifetime of my underachievement. We both needed extra credit, so after we dissected our frog, we took the teacher's challenge and removed the brain whole. I used a blade, but Dana got her Wiccan mojo on and chanted her part. The frog's brain squished out in one piece. The teacher shook his head, but gave us the credit anyway.

Dana swears that I was a witch in another life. Who am I to argue with that? I know she's full of shit, but she lets me make clothes for her and she doesn't laugh when I read her my old poems. Like I said, she was okay. Kind of cool, actually.

Since I'd left Oklahoma, I hadn't written anything. I missed it, but I had a hole in me that I couldn't fill with poetry or music or making clothes. And unlike Mom and what she was doing now, words didn't come easy for me, not after what had happened two years ago.

Although I couldn't be certain, I figured Mom's talking was her way of making an effort to bond. And I had to give her props for timing. I was captive in a moving vehicle for two days. And if she didn't give me a brain bleed from the ritual, she had a pretty good shot at nabbing my attention once in a while. Picking at my nachos, I'd only heard every six and a half words as I scribbled until she finally got my full attention.

"You know…I heard that boy is still locked away in a mental hospital outside Shawano." Mom kept her face down and shoveled her fork like she was being timed. And her talking about White Bird, and referring to him as "that boy," had forced me to listen, especially when she said, "They say he never came out of it."

I stopped scribbling. Cold.

Parents always had "they" to back them up. And "they" were always right. Kids had squat. It was hard to compete with "they." I wanted to roll my eyes because I knew that would piss her off, but I got to thinking about White Bird and what "still" meant.

"Still? You mean he's been there since…" I couldn't finish. All this time, after I had moved away and taken my miserable butt to North Carolina, White Bird had been locked away. Knowing that twisted my gut into a knot. I felt worse than I ever did before.

And that was saying something.

"Yes. That's why you were never asked to testify. His case never went to trial because of his…condition," Mom explained.

I had been so wrapped in my own misery that I had missed the obvious. Mom was right. And I'd never asked about going to court, to say what had happened. I should have known.

I should have thought about what that meant for him, but I never did.

"Why didn't you…" Tell me! Tell me! Tell me! I wanted to scream, but instead I turned to look out at the parking lot and said, "Never mind."

All I wanted to do was lash out at Mom and blame her for my frustration. I knew it wasn't fair, but I also knew she'd let me get away with it.

White Bird had never gotten his day in court. Where had he gone? Was he still inside his head, unable to find his way out of a dark maze? Or had he clicked off like a light switch, never to return? What had happened that night to cause such trauma?

"He never says anything. That boy just sits and stares at nothing." Mom looked up from her salad, making sure I got the point. "Maybe next time you'll listen to me when I tell you some kid isn't right in the head."

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In the Arms of Stone Angels 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
absconditas on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book brought me to tears. I felt as though I were right there alongside Brenna, experiencing everything firsthand. This book touched a lot of issues. There was racism, sexist, and plain old meanness. Brenna the subject of much ridicule because of the simple fact that she was a white girl in love with an Indian boy. The whole town frowned upon this faux-pas, and we saw her being persecuted over and over again. The picture that Dane paints is remarkable, so much so that she has captured such intense emotion in me that I couldn¿t control what I was feeling. I felt hate, and white-hot rage for the townspeople, and was smitten and intrigued by White Bird. There are so many twists and turns, and you don¿t know who to trust. The character development was top-notch, and Dane captured the true essence of humanity on these pages. All in all, this debut was utterly breathtaking.
Bookworm_Lisa on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
You know a book has made an impact when you can't find the words to describe it. I am really struggling to find the words to say my thoughts and impressions of this book.This is a darker YA book. It deals with a young girl who saw the boy that she loves holding a dead body and chanting over it. She called 911 and he was arrested for the crime. She was never able to get over it, even after they moved away from the small town.Two years later she comes back with her mother to clear her grandmother's home and get it ready to sell. Her grandmother had recently passed away. She was met with harsh treatment. People can be so mean! Many in the town think that she had something to do with the murder.White Bird, the boy who was accused of the murder, has been in a catatonic state since the murder. Feeling guilty, she starts to question what she saw and tries to figure out how to help White Bird.This book deals with many issues. One of them is prejudice. White Bird was part Native American and part Caucasian. He was never fully accepted in either culture. That's why he was an easy target, and law enforcement didn't search for further clues.It also deals with abuse. Some of the kids in this story deal with alcohol abuse, drug abuse, mental abuse, and eventually murder. At point the kids gang up on Brenna, the main character, and physically abuse her.I really enjoyed this book. That may sound weird with the subject matter, but it is well written and an attention grabber. My only issues would be the underage drinking, profanity, and sexual innuendo. I would not recommend this book to young readers. It takes an older maturity level to deal with some of the subject matter.
LanoraTM on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Review:In The Arms of Stone Angels is a fiction book geared towards young adults. Brenna, the protagonist is angsty and struggles throughout the novel with her inner demons and secrets.Author Jordan Dane creates a very dark setting that rotates around numerous deaths. Brenna is not only struggling with the death of her grandmother, but the death of a local girl who she believes has been murdered by her first love. Though out the book, Brenna struggles with acceptance, understanding, forgiveness and regret. Teens who have been bullied or can identify with bullying, might find Dane's novel an interesting read. The book also gives American Indian cultural history.Personal thoughts:There were some difficult parts in this book for me to read. I struggled with them because I felt that the "fiction" aspect of them went a little too far. I found it very difficult for me to identify with any of these characters. Brenna seems to be a weak little mouse that turns into a lion - for someone who has been put through so much, she still hasn't lost her mind. There are also some unrealistic parts in this book. I am not talking about Brenna's secret either. I gather they are from a small town, but it sort of frightens me to think that small towns are only good at shoving things under the carpet.
jessibelle on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Jordan Dane has created a wonderful young adult story. Set in the fictional town of Shawano, OK. Brenna Nash has returned to help her mother clean up her grandmother's home after her passing. It has been two years since that fateful day made her and her mother run from this town. Two years since she had last seen the person she loved the most in her life. The book starts out well. It grabs your attention with the dead of Heather, and Brenna seeing her love/boyfriend sitting naked covered in blood close to her mutilated body. All of this is told in a quick little flashback. Brenna turns in Isaac "White Bird" Henry, but is also accused of being an accomplice. Although she vehemently denies it, the town can't help but think she had a hand in it, since it was 3 in the morning that she found both the body and White Bird together. When she returns, old faces pop up and harass her, including the town sheriff. The book touches on many different prejudices that developed in the town and were festering since she left. White Bird is still locked away in his head, and the town still believes she had a hand in Heather's demise.Brenna goes on a whirlwind of a journey, trying to find out the truth and save White Bird at the same time. Did he really kill Heather? Or is something or someone more sinister tricking everyone.
Rachybee on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I must say, going into this book I wasn¿t quite sure what I was expecting. I think I was expecting something supernatural and romantic, something that I¿m used to seeing. Instead, I feel like I got something very different. While there was a supernatural aspect to this book, I feel like it took a back seat to everything else that was going on. Even the romance between Brenna and White Bird wasn¿t overly strong. This story was more a spiritual tale of one girl as she came to terms with who she was and understood everything she was and the world a lot better. It was a tale of growth and coming to know one¿s self. Not to mention going with what you feel, as opposed to what society sees as right. It was about facing your fears and learning to trust yourself. This book was incredibly well written; the writing was flawless. There was plenty of mystery, and I did like that I never quite knew what was going on. There was always one more question, one more answer to discover. The book did have a slow pace, I will admit that. At times it felt like nothing was really happening and yet I didn¿t find myself bored. I feel like the author has done a really great job with this book. For what it is, and the storyline, she¿s managed to create a really great spiritual tale, one which actually made me stop and think. I liked Brenna, I really did. I feel like she was a very real teenager, with real problems. Obviously she¿d been through a bit more than most teens face, but she still dealt with the same things they did. One of the things I enjoyed about her was that she didn¿t care about what other people really thought. She was her own person, and while she had her fair share of insecurities and faults, she didn¿t let them destroy her life. She loved White Bird and even though a lot of people felt their bond and relationship was weird and wrong, she stood by it. Race and skin colour didn¿t mean anything to her and I admire a heroine like that! Brenna had faced a lot in her life; especially the situation with White Bird and Heather Madsen. While I did dislike the fact that she dobbed in her best friend, I can understand why she did it, and morally there was nothing wrong with what she did. She found White Bird bent over the dead girl, acting strangely and she did what most people would do.....she called the cops. The thing I think that sets her apart in this situation is how she felt about it afterwards and how it tormented her and impacted on her life. Unlike most other people who would make up their minds about what happened and how they felt, Brenna began to question what happened and she could never completely accept what people believed about Heather¿s murder. I think the fact that she realised that White Bird may have been innocent and actually decided to do something about it; trying to prove him innocent and help him to begin with, really shows something about her character. Yes, she regretted not standing by him in the beginning, but there really was nothing she could do about that. It was in the past and the only way she could even attempt to make up for it was by trying to do something for White Bird in the present. And she did that. I do however feel that the relationship between Brenna and White Bird was lacking. For what they were supposed to be I never really felt it. I wanted to. There were plenty of times during the story where I wanted to feel the strength of their love and relationship, and yet I just couldn¿t. I did enjoy the glimpses into their past and seeing how they acted, but I feel like the relationship between them could have been a tad better. Considering how amazing everything else was in the book, I expected more. Three characters I also really liked were Brenna¿s mum, Joe and Officer Tate. The author has created a great cast of characters in this book, each with their own purpose and place within the story. At first I was very disappointed with Brenna¿s mother. I felt like she had really let her daughter down during t
DragonLibrary8 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
My thoughts: Wow! I don't even know where to start or what to say about this remarkable story. I finished reading it with tears in my eyes and a lump in my throat. I have a friend who likes to ask me, "Bev, what have your read lately that was profound and thought provoking?" to which I usually answer, "Nothing Doug, you know I read fluff for pleasure." If he was to ask me today, my answer would be different. This story touched my heart and I will remember it always. I usually talk about characters and world building and such when I write a review, but with this book... you truly MUST read it yourself and experience the power of what Jordan Dane has written. I think this book should be read by everyone. It encompasses so much in the worlds of so many.So, for this one - here are some of my favorite quotes...(Location 2818) Things that came from Joe always seemed important. Like White Bird, the man didn't waste words. "Stop questioning the tests that are put in your path. You're given only what you can handle. And those tests - making mistakes and figuring stuff out - that's what makes you stronger." "Quit looking back, Brenna. The only thing you can change is what's ahead of you."(Location 3200) "A journey takes time." The boy shrugged and looked him square in the eye. "And I guess the lessons we learn best, they come from the journey, not the destination."(Location 3306) He looked tall and strong, the way he used to, but somewhere along the way, without me, he'd stepped into the shoes of a man.
kmartin802 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I loved this edgy young adult mystery with a paranormal twist. Brenna has spent the last couple of years buried in guilt because she is the one who accused her best friend of murder when she found him with the knife in his hand over the corpse of one of the local mean girls. She and her mother moved away because of the pressures but now they are back to settle up her grandmother's estate. Brenna learns that her friend White Bird has been catatonic and in a psychiatric hospital since the murder. She is determined to find out what happened and to help her friend.
millett23 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book, I couldn't put it down. I loved the characters and the build up to the end. It was very interesting to see Bree be at total odds with herself over what happened and then to see the transition to finally freeing herself and getting over the tragic events that happened 2 yrs prior.
amusingmother on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a fairly action-packed book. The teens in this book do not play nice by any stretch. I have mixed feelings about this book. I'll start with what I liked - the protagonist was interesting and willing to grow. Her mother, although first painted as the usual enemy, once apprised of the truth, becomes Brenna's fiercest ally. I also really enjoyed the education on vision quests and a glimpse into the challenges of today's Native American population. Enjoyed the story and the symbolism used in the vision quest.What I didn't like: I know these are small things but they really bugged me. First of all, the psychiatrist breaching his ethical standards by calling the sheriff when there is a change in White Bird's status. Huge lawsuit regarding doctor/patient confidentiality. He won't discuss treatment with the Shaman but he will call the Sheriff? License revoked.I just realized I can't share another irritation because it would be a huge spoiler. Let's just leave it at the way the law is handled. One of which is that the sheriff should have had some consequences regarding something he did although I appreciated the justness of his conscience. The second part is the swiftness regarding resolution. Not the way the justice system or social services works. The process is long and painful.Besides those irritations, the story is interesting, enlightening and disturbing.
Readingfanatic1 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This ended up being a very emotional read for me. People can be so mean, so judgmental and you really see it in this book. It was a quick read even at over 300 pages because the writing is good. There were times when my heart felt like it was going to break with the wrongness that was occurring and other times, when I wanted to yell "good for you" when things were made right! The mystery element in the book is very good. It had lots of twists, and every time I thought I knew what was going to happen, I was wrong!
dearheart on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Sixteen year-old Brenna is being forced to go back to Oklahoma after her grandmother¿s death to help pack up the house and put it on the market. She and her mother had been driven out of town after Brenna¿s best friend, a half-breed named White Bird, had been arrested for the murder of a girl. The awkward thing is Brenna is the one who called the police after seeing him bloody with a knife in his hand, chanting over the dead girl¿s body. She¿s horrified when arriving back in town that he¿s been in a catatonic state since that day in a mental institution, and the dead girl¿s friends have a reason to want to keep Brenna from nosing around.Brenna is not your average girl and not even her mother is aware of her ability to see the dead, or the comfort she gets from sneaking out of the house at night to sleep old cemeteries that have stone angels. She¿s incredibly angry and dresses in her own unique homeless-look attire combinations.As an adult I had a difficult time relating to Brenna at the beginning of the story; at least until other people become involved and the focus shifts to the mystery. We then get to see her real personality, and she¿s a pretty special person. The story contains a great deal of Native American wisdom and mysticism. This is somewhat of an edgy read, and I really enjoyed the mystery and drama. But I feel like the author dropped the ball by not following through on a couple of things that were important to Brenna, and I was sorry to see those aspects missing. The story doesn¿t feel quite complete without them.Reviewed for Vine Voice
kL1028 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I'm usually really good at predicting what is going to happen in books but boy was i thrown for a loop...this was an awesome read and i would recommend it to those who like mystery with a dash of the supernatural thrown in and a touch of romance. The characters made you feel for them and as other reviewers have said it was an emotional read but i loved every twist and turn!
booktwirps on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Brenna Nash sees dead people. Not only does she see them, but she likes sleeping in cemeteries. This is her other ¿home¿. Whereas most people would be creeped out by being in a cemetery after dark, Brenna finds comfort there.Brenna spends most of her childhood as an outcast. She never really fits in. While most girls enjoy shopping and playing dress up, Brenna likes playing outdoors and getting muddy. When she meets Isaac Henry, or White Bird as he prefers to be called, she finds the one person who doesn¿t judge her. White Bird is a half-breed, ¿part Euchee Indian and part whatever¿, and he is an outcast like Brenna. He is an orphan, and wants more than anything to be welcomed in to the Euchee tribe, but since he is a half-breed, they won¿t let him in. White Bird and Brenna understand one another, and eventually her fourteen-year-old self falls in love with him. This sounds like the perfect setup for a nice teen romance, but that all changes when Brenna finds White Bird kneeling over the body of a girl Brenna went to school with, and Brenna turns him in, pegging him as the murderer.Two years later Brenna and her mother are now living in South Carolina, but when her grandmother dies, they are forced to go back to Oklahoma to clean up the house so it can be sold. When they get back to town, Brenna discovers that White Bird had never been tried for the murder. Instead, he has been locked up in a mental institution in a catatonic state. Brenna sneaks off to meet White Bird and is shocked at what she discovers and is even more shocked at what she sees in a vision when she touches him. She knows he is trying to tell her something but she doesn¿t know what. She decides she owes it to him to try and piece together everything, but there are people in the town that want to leave White Bird just the way he is, and they will do anything to keep Brenna quiet.From the first chapter I immediately knew who Brenna was. Sometimes it takes a while to get a feel for a character, and what makes them tick, but Dane introduces the reader to Brenna so effortlessly and with such pin-point accuracy you feel like you are jumping in to a story with someone you¿ve known for years. Everything about Brenna¿s character was believable. Her FU attitude, her angst and the thoughts going through her head were all things that made her seem real. The rest of the characters are just as tightly drawn. I never found myself thinking ¿Wait, that seems totally out of character for that person.¿ The plot was perfectly paced and the resolution hit me like a smack to the head. I totally didn¿t see it coming.Jordan Dane has written an amazing, breath-taking young adult novel. It has paranormal elements mixed with romance, Indian folklore and murder mystery. This book had everything I could have wanted in a great, suspenseful read. The only problem that I had with it was that it ended, and I wanted it to keep going.
B00KAH0LIC on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I have to say, I did not particularly enjoy reading this book. I put off reading it for a while, and when I do that with a book I end up just wanting to get through it. I didn't feel a connection to the characters, I didn't even like them. I found them all to be slightly irritating. Once I started the book I was able to keep reading all the way through, so it did grab my attention. The plotline was fairly intriguing, but some scenes made me roll my eyes. I don't like giving bad reviews, but I just didn't enjoy it very much.
megtall on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
In The Arms Of Stone Angels is seriously one of the best YA novels I have read in a very long time. I didn't know exactly what to expect when I started reading, and I should add that I am overwhelmingly surprised and pleased with the story. The novel has everything that teens want: adventure, paranormality, outcast issues, romance, mystery, suspense and a happy closing. I absolutely loved Brenna from the get-go. She was angsty, misunderstood, and smart-alecky. But she also had a depth and a maturity underneath that rou exterior that I found endearing. And, wow, that ending sequence had me on pins and needles! I was so worried that not only would Brenna never get to exonerate White Bird, but that she would be incriminated instead. What amazing writing! It's kept me up way past my bedtime the last few nights, and I've already recommended the title to several patrons. 5 stars all the way!
Bookswithbite on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Lately, I have been reading so many book about sacrifice. And if one thing I learn is that sacrifice means a lot. It means you love the person enough to do anything. Brenna accused her friend of the imaginable. She never thought he could ever do anything like murder. Hurt by the revelations, Brenna moves away and comes back. Little did she know that she find out exactly what happened.This book touched a lot of issues. There was racism, sexist, and plain old meanness. Brenna was sought out by people because she was a white woman dating Indian boy. Their love was forbidden and the town frown upon it big time. So much that they hurt Brenna just to send a message. I was appalled by their actions and desperately wanted it all to stop. Nevertheless, Brenna never got their message and did what she could to clear her best friends name no matter what it took. You go girl!!White Bird is a good young man. His reasons and his ties behind the murder were not what I thought. You know how you read a book or watch a movie and you think you know whats going to happen but in the end it was the exact opposite? Well I thought I knew, but Ms. Dane kept everything in the book really suspenseful and on my toes.The research and information on the Indian tribe I loved learning. If one thing I love is to learn new things from a book. I learned a lot about the Indian tribe and the traditions that they have.
pacey1927 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
"In The Arms of Stone Angels" is the first book I have read by author Jordan Dane. Its partly a romance, partly a paranormal, partly a mystery and those parts add up to one impressive story. In "Arms", teenager Brenna Nash and her mother go back to thier old hometown to take care of the house left empty after her grandmother's death. Brenna goes back with a heavy heart because they left town two years earlier after Brenna had been investigated as a part of a murder investigation. Brenna was actually the one who called 911 to report finding her best friend, White Bird, holding the body of Heather, one of their classmates. White Bird was covered in Heather's blood and also holding the murder weapon. Ever since that time, Brenna has been second guessing her response to what she saw that night. White Bird could never be a killer, he was too gentle. And he had nothing to do with witchy, snobby, Heather or equally snotty friends, right? But now White Bird is in a mental hospital, locked in a world only he can see and unresponsive to everyone. His health is going downhill and the local townsfolk would just love to see him regain his sanity and be found fit to stand trial for the murder. But if White Bird was the guilty one, why is Brenna being picked on by the local snobs for coming back to town and why does her reappearance seem to spark such disgust in the entire town? Dane weaves quite an amazing story. There is so much going on. The story touches upon bullying (with a very disturbing sequence that left me truly horrified and upset), bigotry, Indian culture and practices and young romance. The mystery is done well and I was mildly suprised by the way that part of the story turned out. The paranormal aspects deal with the Indian practices and it was uniquely done, however I would have liked a little more of the paranormal action. The premise of this part of the book is almost like a 'hallucination' and I found the details somewhat vague and confusing and I would have liked some more explanation for those scenes. One or two scenes were brief and one was more extended and to me, more confusing. I loved White Bird and was disappointed that most of what we see of his character is done through flashbacks that detail the friendship and then relationship between White Bird and Brenna. He was one of the most interesting characters and I really wish there was more of him! The other Indian character was an older tribe leader and I loved also what he added to the story. The snobby clique was portrayed realistically nasty and I sure wouldn't want to have to run into those kids. One of the greatest strengths of this story is the relationship between Brenna and her mother. They don't see eye to eye and Brenna gets on her mothers nerves as much as her mother gets on Brenna's. The relationship comes across very natural and also true to life. Yet Brenna eventually trust her mother with the details of her situation, even the freaky ones, and her mom is there for her. Far too often in YA literature the parents aren't in the story, or the parents never learn about what their children are going through. This is very much a quick and unforgettable read and I encourage anyone with interst to buy this one.
chapterxchapter More than 1 year ago
Seriously when I read the synopsis of the novel I knew it would be good! Who doesn’t want to read a good old supernatural murder mystery? As I began to read into the life of my new favorite female main character, Brenna Nash, I found myself becoming more and more intrigued The girl can see dead people after all! She also goes to sleep in the graveyard and she saw her best friend, White Bird leaning over a dead girls body. Kinda creepy… Anyways I constantly found myself thinking, “Poor Brenna” when she moved back to the town where she was accused of being a part of Heather Madsen’s murder. The novel had emotions stirring in me that only a nicely crafted novel can. All of Brenna’s memories from her and White Bird’s childhood had my heart melting, or whenever Brenna was in trouble I found myself hoping that she would be okay. Now I know that some of you are thinking, ‘why would she get in trouble?’ Well, it’s an easy answer…see for some unknown reason (which becomes clear at the end of the novel) all of the popular people have it out for Brenna, hoping that she won’t try to open back up Heather Madsen’s case. How better to keep her quiet than by humiliating her? Something I found interesting was how Jordan Dane described some of the Euchee traditions that White Bird was involved in, and how she described White Bird’s personal hell that he was trapped in. And I absolutely love, love, loved getting to see from Jade Deluca, Derek Logan and Sheriff Logan’s POV, mainly because I found myself wondering, ‘why do I have to know what they’re doing?’, and got the answer during the explosive ending that I did not see coming. At. All. Like, honestly when I came across the ending my heart stopped beating, it was just so unexpected and unpredictable. Reader beware. I recommend this to anybody who wants to read an awesome, paranormal murder mystery mixed in with teen life, with some revenge thrown into a story with such a great ending. Totally unexpected. Totally loved it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ayanna Wright More than 1 year ago
I loved this book it was wonderful. I wish i could meet white bird. Soooooo so good.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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OtotheD More than 1 year ago
Brenna Nash sees dead people. Not only does she see them, but she likes sleeping in cemeteries. This is her other "home". Whereas most people would be creeped out by being in a cemetery after dark, Brenna finds comfort there. Brenna spends most of her childhood as an outcast. She never really fits in. While most girls enjoy shopping and playing dress up, Brenna likes playing outdoors and getting muddy. When she meets Isaac Henry, or White Bird as he prefers to be called, she finds the one person who doesn't judge her. White Bird is a half-breed, "part Euchee Indian and part whatever", and he is an outcast like Brenna. He is an orphan, and wants more than anything to be welcomed in to the Euchee tribe, but since he is a half-breed, they won't let him in. White Bird and Brenna understand one another, and eventually her fourteen-year-old self falls in love with him. This sounds like the perfect setup for a nice teen romance, but that all changes when Brenna finds White Bird kneeling over the body of a girl Brenna went to school with, and Brenna turns him in, pegging him as the murderer. Two years later Brenna and her mother are now living in South Carolina, but when her grandmother dies, they are forced to go back to Oklahoma to clean up the house so it can be sold. When they get back to town, Brenna discovers that White Bird had never been tried for the murder. Instead, he has been locked up in a mental institution in a catatonic state. Brenna sneaks off to meet White Bird and is shocked at what she discovers and is even more shocked at what she sees in a vision when she touches him. She knows he is trying to tell her something but she doesn't know what. She decides she owes it to him to try and piece together everything, but there are people in the town that want to leave White Bird just the way he is, and they will do anything to keep Brenna quiet. From the first chapter I immediately knew who Brenna was. Sometimes it takes a while to get a feel for a character, and what makes them tick, but Dane introduces the reader to Brenna so effortlessly and with such pin-point accuracy you feel like you are jumping in to a story with someone you've known for years. Everything about Brenna's character was believable. Her FU attitude, her angst and the thoughts going through her head were all things that made her seem real. The rest of the characters are just as tightly drawn. I never found myself thinking "Wait, that seems totally out of character for that person." The plot was perfectly paced and the resolution hit me like a smack to the head. I totally didn't see it coming. Jordan Dane has written an amazing, breath-taking young adult novel. It has paranormal elements mixed with romance, Indian folklore and murder mystery. This book had everything I could have wanted in a great, suspenseful read. The only problem that I had with it was that it ended, and I wanted it to keep going.
ChelseaW More than 1 year ago
Brenna Nash is in trouble. Her mother has just moved them back to Shawano, Oklahoma, the site where two years ago she was all but accused (but not convicted) of a terrible deed. It's hard enough for Brenna to live with what she saw her then-boyfriend White Bird do, but the residents of Shawano certainly aren't going to cut her any slack. However, with strength she wasn't sure she possessed, Brenna go to visit White Bird, re-living that horrible night and the days leading up to it. But if bringing so much pain to the surface reveals the truth, it may be worth it after all. This is a rather dark book. Really. Brenna is very moody and her angst spills off every page. It pained me to watch Brenna go through such torture from the other kids without being able to stand up for herself. But it was nice to read scenes from her mother's POV as well, because the reader saw how Brenna's mom really was trying to help. There is a light paranormal element throughout the story, but for the most part it is all reality. Jordan Dane has thought closely about her characters and their actions, and it shows through in the dialog especially. I must admit that the first half of the book was pretty intense, even for me. Readers who stick it out past the brutal scenes will be rewarded with a much more mellow second half, as well as answers to all of their questions. A surprising read and a worthy journey.