The Indicted South: Public Criticism, Southern Inferiority, and the Politics of Whiteness

The Indicted South: Public Criticism, Southern Inferiority, and the Politics of Whiteness

by Angie Maxwell

Paperback(1)

$37.50
View All Available Formats & Editions
Members save with free shipping everyday! 
See details

Overview

By the 1920s, the sectional reconciliation that had seemed achievable after Reconstruction was foundering, and the South was increasingly perceived and portrayed as impoverished, uneducated, and backward. In this interdisciplinary study, Angie Maxwell examines and connects three key twentieth-century moments in which the South was exposed to intense public criticism, identifying in white southerners' responses a pattern of defensiveness that shaped the region's political and cultural conservatism.

Maxwell exposes the way the perception of regional inferiority confronted all types of southerners, focusing on the 1925 Scopes trial in Dayton, Tennessee, and the birth of the anti-evolution movement; the publication of I'll Take My Stand and the turn to New Criticism by the Southern Agrarians; and Virginia's campaign of Massive Resistance and Interposition in response to the Brown v. Board of Education decision. Tracing the effects of media scrutiny and the ridicule that characterized national discourse in each of these cases, Maxwell reveals the reactionary responses that linked modern southern whiteness with anti-elitism, states' rights, fundamentalism, and majoritarianism.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781469611648
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date: 04/15/2014
Series: New Directions in Southern Studies
Edition description: 1
Pages: 324
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

Angie Maxwell is Diane D. Blair Assistant Professor of Southern Studies at the University of Arkansas.

Table of Contents


By the 1920s, the sectional reconciliation that had seemed achievable after Reconstruction was foundering, and the South was increasingly perceived and portrayed as impoverished, uneducated, and backward. In this interdisciplinary study, Maxwell examines and connects three key twentieth-century moments in which the South was exposed to intense public criticism, identifying in white southerners' responses a pattern of defensiveness that shaped the region's political and cultural conservatism.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

An insightful, well-researched and very readable book, which captures a pivotal era in southern history. It should appeal to readers in historical and literary studies as well as to the general reader interested in the twentieth-century South.—Fred Hobson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Customer Reviews