The Industrial Training of the Girl

The Industrial Training of the Girl

by William Arch McKeever

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III ATTENDING THE PUBLIC SCHOOL On first thought it might seem to the reader that the public school attendance is not rightly considered as a part of the industrial training. However, it is our purpose here so to regard it. The best definition of work and industry makes little or no distinction between using the head and using the hands. Its substantial meaning is that of the attitude of the individual toward the task before him. So we should regard the public school training which the growing girl receives as first of all an affair of industrial discipline; and we should have her learn to regard her school lessons as plain work-a-day tasks which call for the best of her painstaking effort and patience. Work Distinguished From Play If parents and teachers will all carefully draw a line of distinction between the work assignments and the play activities of the child, a point of progress in training will thereby be gained. Perhaps there was really some justification in labelling everything in the kindergarten school as play. But if the kindergarten training of the girl— now arrived at school age—has been rightly conducted, she has been impressed gradually with the idea of that necessity which attaches itself to all good work. At any rate the young learner just entering the grades is brought into a new relationship to her appointed activities. There is now no necessity of trying to make her believe that the assigned work is mere play. On the other hand, sheshould be impressedwith the thought that the lessons are prescribed, that certain standards of excellence are to be met, and that her promotions are to be earned by her own efforts. Of course, there is always a possibility of making the little school girl feel that she has been driven to her lessons, but such ...

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780469406759
Publisher: Creative Media Partners, LLC
Publication date: 02/22/2019
Pages: 110
Product dimensions: 6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 0.23(d)

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CHAPTER III ATTENDING THE PUBLIC SCHOOL On first thought it might seem to the reader that the public school attendance is not rightly considered as a part of the industrial training. However, it is our purpose here so to regard it. The best definition of work and industry makes little or no distinction between using the head and using the hands. Its substantial meaning is that of the attitude of the individual toward the task before him. So we should regard the public school training which the growing girl receives as first of all an affair of industrial discipline; and we should have her learn to regard her school lessons as plain work-a-day tasks which call for the best of her painstaking effort and patience. Work Distinguished From Play If parents and teachers will all carefully draw a line of distinction between the work assignments and the play activities of the child, a point of progress in training will thereby be gained. Perhaps there was really some justification in labelling everything in the kindergarten school as play. But if the kindergarten training of the girl— now arrived at school age—has been rightly conducted, she has been impressed gradually with the idea of that necessity which attaches itself to all good work. At any rate the young learner just entering the grades is brought into a new relationship to her appointed activities. There is now no necessity of trying to make her believe that the assigned work is mere play. On the other hand, sheshould be impressed with the thought that the lessons are prescribed, that certain standards of excellence are to be met, and that her promotions are to be earned by her own efforts. Of course, there is always apossibility of making the little school girl feel that she has been driven to her lessons, but such ...

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