ISBN-10:
0205609996
ISBN-13:
9780205609994
Pub. Date:
08/12/2008
Publisher:
Pearson
Influence: Science and Practice / Edition 5

Influence: Science and Practice / Edition 5

by Robert B. Cialdini

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780205609994
Publisher: Pearson
Publication date: 08/12/2008
Series: Alternative eText Formats Series
Pages: 272
Sales rank: 44,896
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.60(d)
Lexile: 1280L (what's this?)

About the Author

Robert B. Cialdini is Regents’ Professor of Psychology and Marketing at Arizona State University, where he has also been named W. P. Carey Distinguished Professor of Marketing. He has taught at Stanford University and Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He has been elected president of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology. He is the recipient of the Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award of the Society for Consumer Psychology, the Donald T. Campbell Award for Distinguished Contributions to Social Psychology, and the (inaugural) Peitho Award for Distinguished Contributions to the Science of Social Influence.

Dr. Cialdini attributes his interest in social influences to the fact that he was raised in an entirely Italian family, in a predominantly Polish neighborhood, in a historically German city (Milwaukee), in an otherwise rural state.

Read an Excerpt

The initial version of Influence was designed for the popular reader, and as such, an attempt was made to write it in an engaging style. In the subsequent versions, that style is retained, but in addition, I present the research evidence for my statements, recommendations, and conclusions. Although they are dramatized and corroborated through such devices as interviews, quotes, and systematic personal observations, the conclusions of Influence are based on controlled, psychological research. This fact allows the instructor, the student, and the popular reader to feel confident that the book is not "pop" psychology but represents work that is scientifically grounded. The subsequent versions also provide new and updated material, chapter summaries, and study questions to enhance its classroom utility.

A potentially attractive feature of the present version of Influence lies in its ability to serve as an enjoyable, practical, yet scientifically documented text for both students and the general reader. For students, one way to view the book, then, is to see it as a refreshing change of pace (from standard text material) that does not retreat from scientific respectability. In a related vein, for both students and the general reader, the book might be seen as a way to demonstrate that, properly presented, what often seems like dry science can actually prove to be lively, useful, and relevant to all readers' personal lives.

COMMENT ON THE FOURTH EDITION OF INFLUENCE: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE

It has been some time since Influence was last published. In the interim, some things have happened that deserve a place in this new edition. First, we nowknow more about the influence process than before. The study of persuasion, compliance, and change has advanced, and the pages that follow have been adapted to reflect that progress. In addition to an overall update of the material, I have expanded a feature that was stimulated by the responses of prior readers.

This feature highlights the experiences of individuals who have read Influence, recognized how one of the principles worked on (or for) them in a particular instance, and wrote to me describing the event. Their descriptions, which appear in the "Reader's Reports" in each chapter, illustrate how easily and frequently we can fall victim to the influence process in our everyday lives.

An array of people deserve and have my appreciation for their aid in making Influence possible. Several of my academic colleagues read and provided perceptive comments on the entire manuscript in its initial draft form, greatly strengthening the subsequent version. They are Gus Levine, Doug Kenrick, Art Beaman, and Mark Zanna. In addition, the first draft was read by a few family members and friends Richard and Gloria Cialdini, Bobette Gorden, and Ted Hall-who offered not only much-needed emotional support but insightful substantive commentary as well.

A second, larger group provided helpful suggestions for selected chapters or groups of chapters: Todd Anderson, Sandy Braver, Catherine Chambers, Judi Cialdini, Nancy Eisenberg, Larry Ettkin, Joanne Gersten, Jeff Goldstein, Betsy Hans, Valerie Hans, Joe Hepworth, Holly Hunt, Ann Inskeep, Barry Leshowitz, Darwyn Linder, Debbie Littler, John Mowen, Igor Pavlov, Janis Posner, Trish Puryear, Marilyn Rall, John Reich, Peter Reingen, Diane Ruble, Phyllis Sensenig, Roman Sherman, and Henry Wellman.

Certain people were instrumental at the beginning stages. John Staley was the first publishing professional to recognize the project's potential. Jim Sherman, Al Goethals, John Keating, Dan Wagner, Dalmas Taylor, Wendy Wood, and David Watson provided early, positive reviews that encouraged author and editors alike. My editors at Allyn and Bacon, Carolyn Merrill and Jodi Devine, were consistently congenial, helpful, and insightful. I would like to thank the following users of the third edition for their feedback during a telephone survey: Emory Griffin, Wheaton College; Robert Levine, California State, Fresno; Jeffrey Lewin, Georgia State University; David Miller, Daytona Beach Community College; Lois Mohr, Georgia State University; and Richard Rogers, Daytona Beach Community College. The third edition benefited substantially from the reviews of Assaad Azzi, Yale University; Robert M. Brady, University of Arkansas; Brian M. Cohen, University of Texas at San Antonio; Christian B. Crandall, University of Florida; Catherine Goodwin, University of Alaska; Robert G. Lowder, Bradley University; James W. Michael, Jr., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Eugene P. Sheehan, University of Northern Colorado; Jefferson A. Singer, Connecticut College; and Sandi W. Smith, Michigan State University. Finally, throughout the project, no one was more on my side than Bobette Gorden, who lived every word with me.

I wish to thank the following individuals who-either directly or through their course instructors-contributed the "Reader's Reports" used in this edition: Pat Bobbs, Annie Carto, William Cooper, Alicia Friedman, William Graziano, Mark Hastings, Endayehu Kendie, Danuta Lubnicka, James Michaels, Steven Moysey, Paul Nail, Alan J. Resnik, Daryl Retzlaff, Geofrey Rosenberger, Dan Swift, and Karla Vasks.

I would also like to invite new readers to contribute similar "Reports" for possible publication in a future edition. They can be sent to me at the Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1104 or Robert.Cialdini@ ASU.EDU. Finally, more influence-relevant information can be obtained at Influenceatwork.com.

R.B.C.

Table of Contents

All chapters conclude with “Summary” and “Study Questions.”

Preface.
Introduction.

1.Weapons of Influence.

Click, Whirr.

Betting the Shortcut Odd.

The Profiteers.

Jujitsu.

Reader's Report.

2.Reciprocation: The Old Give and Take … and Take.

How the Rule Works.

Reciprocal Concessions.

Rejection-Then-Retreat.

Defense.

Reader's Report.

3.Commitment and Consistency: Hobgoblins of the Mind.

Whirring Along.

Commitment Is the Key.

Defense.

Reader's Report.

4.Social Proof: Truths Are Us.

The Principle of Social Proof.

Cause of Death: Uncertain(ty).

Monkey Me, Monkey Do.

Defense.

Reader's Report.

5.Liking: The Friendly Thief.

Making Friends to Influence People.

Why Do I Like You? Let Me List the Reasons.

Conditioning and Association.

Defense.

Reader's Report.

6.Authority: Directed Deference.

The Power of Authority Pressure.

The Allures and Dangers of Blind Obedience.

Connotation Not Content.

Defense.

Reader's Report.

7.Scarcity: The Rule of the Few.

Less Is Best and Loss Is Worst.

Psychological Reactance.

Optimal Conditions.

Defense.

Reader's Report.

8.Instant Influence: Primitive Consent for an Automatic Age.

Primitive Automaticity.

Modern Automaticity.

Shortcuts Shall Be Sacred.

References.
Credits.
Index.

Preface

The initial version of Influence was designed for the popular reader, and as such, an attempt was made to write it in an engaging style. In the subsequent versions, that style is retained, but in addition, I present the research evidence for my statements, recommendations, and conclusions. Although they are dramatized and corroborated through such devices as interviews, quotes, and systematic personal observations, the conclusions of Influence are based on controlled, psychological research. This fact allows the instructor, the student, and the popular reader to feel confident that the book is not "pop" psychology but represents work that is scientifically grounded. The subsequent versions also provide new and updated material, chapter summaries, and study questions to enhance its classroom utility.

A potentially attractive feature of the present version of Influence lies in its ability to serve as an enjoyable, practical, yet scientifically documented text for both students and the general reader. For students, one way to view the book, then, is to see it as a refreshing change of pace (from standard text material) that does not retreat from scientific respectability. In a related vein, for both students and the general reader, the book might be seen as a way to demonstrate that, properly presented, what often seems like dry science can actually prove to be lively, useful, and relevant to all readers' personal lives.

COMMENT ON THE FOURTH EDITION OF INFLUENCE: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE
It has been some time since Influence was last published. In the interim, some things have happened that deserve a place in this new edition. First, we now know more about theinfluence process than before. The study of persuasion, compliance, and change has advanced, and the pages that follow have been adapted to reflect that progress. In addition to an overall update of the material, I have expanded a feature that was stimulated by the responses of prior readers.

This feature highlights the experiences of individuals who have read Influence, recognized how one of the principles worked on (or for) them in a particular instance, and wrote to me describing the event. Their descriptions, which appear in the "Reader's Reports" in each chapter, illustrate how easily and frequently we can fall victim to the influence process in our everyday lives.

An array of people deserve and have my appreciation for their aid in making Influence possible. Several of my academic colleagues read and provided perceptive comments on the entire manuscript in its initial draft form, greatly strengthening the subsequent version. They are Gus Levine, Doug Kenrick, Art Beaman, and Mark Zanna. In addition, the first draft was read by a few family members and friends Richard and Gloria Cialdini, Bobette Gorden, and Ted Hall-who offered not only much-needed emotional support but insightful substantive commentary as well.

A second, larger group provided helpful suggestions for selected chapters or groups of chapters: Todd Anderson, Sandy Braver, Catherine Chambers, Judi Cialdini, Nancy Eisenberg, Larry Ettkin, Joanne Gersten, Jeff Goldstein, Betsy Hans, Valerie Hans, Joe Hepworth, Holly Hunt, Ann Inskeep, Barry Leshowitz, Darwyn Linder, Debbie Littler, John Mowen, Igor Pavlov, Janis Posner, Trish Puryear, Marilyn Rall, John Reich, Peter Reingen, Diane Ruble, Phyllis Sensenig, Roman Sherman, and Henry Wellman.

Certain people were instrumental at the beginning stages. John Staley was the first publishing professional to recognize the project's potential. Jim Sherman, Al Goethals, John Keating, Dan Wagner, Dalmas Taylor, Wendy Wood, and David Watson provided early, positive reviews that encouraged author and editors alike. My editors at Allyn and Bacon, Carolyn Merrill and Jodi Devine, were consistently congenial, helpful, and insightful. I would like to thank the following users of the third edition for their feedback during a telephone survey: Emory Griffin, Wheaton College; Robert Levine, California State, Fresno; Jeffrey Lewin, Georgia State University; David Miller, Daytona Beach Community College; Lois Mohr, Georgia State University; and Richard Rogers, Daytona Beach Community College. The third edition benefited substantially from the reviews of Assaad Azzi, Yale University; Robert M. Brady, University of Arkansas; Brian M. Cohen, University of Texas at San Antonio; Christian B. Crandall, University of Florida; Catherine Goodwin, University of Alaska; Robert G. Lowder, Bradley University; James W. Michael, Jr., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Eugene P. Sheehan, University of Northern Colorado; Jefferson A. Singer, Connecticut College; and Sandi W. Smith, Michigan State University. Finally, throughout the project, no one was more on my side than Bobette Gorden, who lived every word with me.

I wish to thank the following individuals who-either directly or through their course instructors-contributed the "Reader's Reports" used in this edition: Pat Bobbs, Annie Carto, William Cooper, Alicia Friedman, William Graziano, Mark Hastings, Endayehu Kendie, Danuta Lubnicka, James Michaels, Steven Moysey, Paul Nail, Alan J. Resnik, Daryl Retzlaff, Geofrey Rosenberger, Dan Swift, and Karla Vasks.

I would also like to invite new readers to contribute similar "Reports" for possible publication in a future edition.

R.B.C.

Customer Reviews

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Influence 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 41 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I frequently reflect on the insights gained from Cialdini¿s superb book in both my private life and my life as a public relations professional (the ultimate influence peddlar). His research is sound and his style completely readable ¿a book filled with many ¿aha!¿ revelations. I recommend this book all the time, often purchasing one to give to a colleague. Simple truths told simply.
2jacks More than 1 year ago
This book tells you in a very concise and direct manner all of the tricks that advertisers, marketers, and salesmen use to get you to buy, to say yes when you really don't want to. If you don't want to be taken advantage of then you need to read this book to understand how its being done.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I bought the book on a recommendation of an aquaintance. I was told it was a MUST READ for everyone. I figured what the heck and bought it. I couldn't put it down from page 1. I breezed thru it and I loved it. I was actually getting flustered near the end because I wanted more. This is an excellent book! Highly recommend it!
callmejacx on LibraryThing 17 hours ago
I learned a lot from this book. I wasn't in the mood to read this book at this time but glad that I did. It sure opened my eyes. Those sales men sure know how to presuade us to do things we might not have normally done. Now that I know their secrets I am going to show them. I am not just a pretty blonde anymore. tee hee.
BrianDewey on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Cialdini, Robert B.. Influence: Science and Practice. Allyn and Bacon, Boston, 2001. This book describes the techniques that ``influence professionals'' (salespeople, etc.) use to get us to agree to their requests. Cialdini describes six broad strategies: Reciprocity (do a favor first), Committment (e.g., get the mark to commit to a smaller action first), Social Proof (everybody else is doing it!), Liking (self explanatory), Authority (actors playing doctors in commercials), and Scarcity (let people think they're competing for a scarce resource). This book is valuable on two levels: In my current job, I need to learn to wield influence. Second, I need to learn when people are trying techniques to influence me. There are two big selling points to this book. First, it is clearly and entertainingly written. Second, Cialdini extensively cites research to back his claims. Although this is a ``business book,'' Cialdini establishes his credibility with hard evidence.
lorin on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Human beings use a number of heuristics to simplify our decision-making processes. Unfortunately, these heuristics can be exploited by other people for personal gain. Cialdini describes how people can be influenced to do things contrary to their own best interests by describing a series of psychology experiments that have been conducted by him as well as other psychologists. He also offers some strategies for defence against unwanted influence.
lool on LibraryThing 3 months ago
The first time I read it, it was a pdf file on my computer. I was so hooked, it took me just one week-end to read it in one go.It should be a classic of self-awareness. It will be much more difficult for somebody to manipulate you after you read this book.
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