The Informant: An Otto Penzler Book

The Informant: An Otto Penzler Book

by Thomas Perry
4.1 24

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Overview

The Informant: An Otto Penzler Book by Thomas Perry

In Thomas Perry’s Edgar-winning debut The Butcher’s Boy, a professional killer betrayed by the Mafia leaves countless mobsters dead and then disappears. Justice Department official Elizabeth Waring is the only one who believes he ever existed. Many years later, the Butcher’s Boy finds his peaceful life threatened when a Mafia hit team finally catches up with him. He knows they won’t stop coming and decides to take the fight to their door. 

Soon Waring, now high up in the Organized Crime Division of the Justice Department, receives a surprise latenight visit from the Butcher’s Boy. Knowing she keeps track of the Mafia, he asks her whom his attackers worked for, offering information that will help her crack an unsolved murder in return. So begins a new assault on organized crime and an uneasy alliance between opposite sides of the law. As the Butcher’s Boy works his way ever closer to his quarry in an effort to protect his new way of life, Waring is in a race against time, either to convince him to become a protected informant—or to take him out of commission for good.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780547569642
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date: 05/05/2011
Series: Butcher's Boy Series , #3
Sold by: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 336
Sales rank: 63,300
File size: 1 MB

About the Author

THOMAS PERRY is the author of the Jane Whitefield series as well as the best-selling novels Nightlife, Death Benefits, and Pursuit. He won the Edgar Award for The Butcher’s Boy, and Metzger’s Dog was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year.

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The Informant (Butcher's Boy Series #3) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
gloriafeit More than 1 year ago
As in his earlier novels [and I’m thinking particularly of the wonderful Jane Whitefield series], the devil is in the details, and this author excels in conveying the meticulously planned and executed steps taken by his protagonist, so that credibility is never an issue. In this standalone – actually, a follow-up to Mr. Perry’s very first novel, The Butcher’s Boy [for which he won an Edgar award] – that eponymous character returns, twenty years older. Although he goes by any number of other names, that soubriquet is the name by which he is known, both to the authorities and to the mafia members who variously employed him, betrayed him, and then became his victims. The Butcher’s Boy kills without compunction. It is, after all, what he does best, taught since childhood, simply as a job, or a way to stay alive, or to seek revenge for the aforementioned betrayal. Rarely is it personal. Although somewhat more so of late. Well-trained from the age of 10 by an actual butcher, whose “side job” is in “the killing trade,” beyond the necessary skills he is also taught “Everybody dies. It’s just a question of timing, and whether the one who gets paid for it is you or a bunch of doctors. It might as well be you.” While working as a hit man, his philosophy was simple: He had “resisted the camaraderie that some of the capos who had hired him tried to foster. He had kept his distance, done his job, collected his pay, and left town before buyer’s remorse set in. He made it clear that he was a free agent and that he was nobody’s friend.” He has been out of the US for over twenty years, now over 50 years old, and afraid he had gone soft. But his skills are not diminished. He leaves no witnesses. The ones who aren’t dead never notice him entering or leaving a crime scene: “He was a master at being the one the eye passed over in a crowd.” And the authorities - - with one notable exception - - haven’t a clue. That exception is Elizabeth Waring, of the Organized Crime & Racketeering Division of the Department of Justice. She connects the dots and has no doubt that he has come out of retirement and is the one now murdering Mafiosi at an alarming rate, and sees in him, potentially, “the most promising informant in forty years.” Of course, to fulfill that possibility she must get him to agree and, even more difficult, keep him alive, as “he wasn’t worth anything dead.” They embark on an ambivalent, and somewhat fluid, relationship, equal parts grudging respect and fear of the danger the other represents, somehow both earning sympathy. The author’s trademark suspense as the end of the novel draws near had this reader literally holding her breath. I loved this book, and it is highly recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thomas Perry again deals with crime and criminals in a superior suspense story. That he also gets his licks in against political appointees and a torpid justice bureaucracy is icing on the cake. A great sequel in a field where sequels usually weaken from the original story. I enjoyed it.
athenaMD More than 1 year ago
LOVE this series. I hope there is more Butcher Boy
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The best of the Butcher Boy Series. None stop action, great character development. Sorry when it ended but makes me look forward to #4
dtobyb More than 1 year ago
This book was a real page-turner and kept me reading til it was finished....at 3:30 a.m.
dreamweaver4depp More than 1 year ago
Thomas Perry is one of 3 men who are artist"s when it comes to writing the best tale ever . I read these books over and over. I have read all 3 back to back so many times it is not funny. I love a great story...
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KenCady More than 1 year ago
How the reader is supposed to root for a hitman is one of the challenges the author faces as eh takes us on a killing spree by the Butcher Boy, who has been ordered dead by just about the whole Mafia. But he can kill due to his surprising ability to be at the right place at the right time, and the training he had from the stranger who raised him...training him to be a killer but wholesomely pointed out that no molestations occured . Justice Department official Kathleen Waring comes across as inept for most of the novel. It was clear that she was no match for The Butcher Boy, who, I frankly have no need to meet again.
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SanitasPerEscam More than 1 year ago
Thomas Perry has written a book with a woman as his main character/voice who doesn’t talk, act, or think like any woman I’ve known. You shouldn’t write from a woman’s perspective if you lack understanding of how real women think, act, and speak. Your book advances the long tradition of men – who for centuries were the only ones allowed to write/publish books – transferring their way of seeing the world onto female characters. As anyone can quickly figure out, Mr. Perry doesn’t appear to like or admire women. His characterization is insulting to women in general, and there aren’t enough words in the dictionary to describe how insulting it is to intelligent, capable women in any branch of law enforcement. There may be women this stupid and helpless out there, but I can guarantee you they’re not working in law enforcement. Not for long, anyway. And Mr. Perry, you clearly don’t have children and have never studied biology. Throughout nature, it is almost always the female of the species that defends and protects her young – viciously, ruthlessly, and without hesitation. Yet you have the main female character delaying entering a room to rescue her son by closing her eyes to pray. And then she fails to put a bullet in the kidnapper’s head the minute he’s down. Every mother I know – law enforcement or not – would have been emptying the clip into his head, with gusto. I found particularly disturbing the minute detailing of a man beating up the main female character. It’s as if Mr. Perry isn’t content to put words in her mouth or thoughts in her head that only a man would believe a woman would say or think. He also displays his misogynistic tendencies with a blow-by-blow account of the beating. These books are clearly Mr. Perry’s vehicle to show how clever and superior men are, even if they are sociopathic killers who are as willing to wipe out women and children as the man they were hired to kill. I kept getting the feeling you were trying to make the hitman a likable character. Again, that’s unlikely to succeed with any but your sociopathic female readers. Someone willing to harm or kill innocent children will never be likable to women.
AXLP More than 1 year ago
For the Nook Book? Really??? Thieves!!!!!!!