ISBN-10:
0470131187
ISBN-13:
9780470131183
Pub. Date:
04/13/2009
Publisher:
Wiley
Information Security Governence / Edition 1

Information Security Governence / Edition 1

by Krag Brotby

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780470131183
Publisher: Wiley
Publication date: 04/13/2009
Series: Wiley Series in Systems Engineering and Management Series , #53
Pages: 220
Sales rank: 1,168,976
Product dimensions: 6.30(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Krag Brotby, cism, has more than twenty-five years of experience in the computer security field with a focus on governance, metrics, and architecture. A frequent presenter at security conferences, he has authored a variety of publications on information security risk management, governance, and metrics. A principal author and editor of the ISACA CISM review manual and related presentation materials, he has served on the CISM Practice Analysis Task Force defining the information security practice area for the coming years.

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Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION.

CHAPTER 1: GOVERNANCE OVERVIEW.

1.1 What Is It?

1.2 Back to Basics.

1.3 Origins of Governance.

1.4 Governance Definition.

1.5 Information Security Governance.

1.6 Six Outcomes of Effective Security Governance.

1.7 Defining Information, Data, Knowledge.

1.8 Value of Information.

CHAPTER 2: WHY GOVERNANCE?

2.1 Benefits of Good Governance.

2.1.1 Aligning Security with Business Objectives.

2.1.2 Providing the structure and framework to optimizeallocations of limited resources.

2.1.3 Providing assurance that critical decisions are not basedon faulty information.

2.1.4 Ensuring accountability for safeguarding criticalassets.

2.1.5 Increasing trust of customers and stakeholders.

2.1.6 Increasing the company’s worth.

2.1.7 Reducing liability for information inaccuracy or lack ofdue care in protection.

2.1.8 Increasing predictability and reducing uncertainty ofbusiness operations.

2.2 A Management Problem.

CHAPTER 3: LEGAL AND REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS.

3.1 Security Governance and Regulation.

CHAPTER 4: ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES.

4.1 The Board of Directors.

4.2 Executive Management.

4.3 Security Steering Committee.

4.4 The CISCO.

CHAPTER: STRATEGIC METRICS.

5.1 Governance Objectives.

5.1.1 Strategic Direction.

5.1.2 Ensuring Objectives are Achieved.

5.1.3. Risks Managed Appropriately.

5.1.4 Verifying Resources are Used Responsibly.

CHAPTER 6: INFORMATION SECURITY OUTCOMES.

6.1 Defining Outcomes.

6.1.1 Strategic alignment.

6.1.2 Risk Management.

6.1.3 Business process assurance / convergence.

6.1.4 Value delivery.

6.1.5 Resource management.

6.1.6 Performance measurement.

CHAPTER 7: SECURITY GOVERNANCE OBJECTIVES.

7.1 Security Architecture.

7.1.1 Managing Complexity.

7.1.2 Providing a Framework & Road Map.

7.1.3 Simplicity & Clarity through Layering &Modularisation.

7.1.4 Business Focus beyond the Technical Domain.

7.1.5 Objectives of Information Security Architectures.

7.1.6 SABSA Framework for Security Service Management.

7.1.7 SABSA Development Process.

7.1.8 SABSA Lifecycle.

7.1.9 SABSA Attributes.

7.2 COBIT.

7.3 Capability Maturity Model.

7.4 ISO/IEC 27001/ 27002.

7.4.1 ISO 27001.

7.4.2 ISO 27002.

7.5 Other Approaches.

7.5.1 National Cybersecurity Task Force.

CHAPTER 8: RISK MANAGEMENT OBJECTIVES.

Risk Management Responsibilities.

Managing Risk Appropriately.

8.1 Determining Risk Management Objectives.

8.1.1 Recovery Time Objectives.

CHAPTER 9: CURRENT STATE.

9.1 Current State of Security.

9.2 Current State of Risk Management.

9.3 Gap Analysis - Unmitigated Risk.

9.3.1 SABSA.

9.3.2 CMM.

CHAPTER 10: DEVELOPING A SECURITY STRATEGY.

10.1 Failures of Strategy.

10.2 Attributes of A Good Security Strategy.

10.3 Strategy Resources.

10.3.1 Utilizing Architecture for Strategy Development.

10.3.2 Using Cobit for Strategy Development.

10.3.3 Using CMM for Strategy Development.

10.4 STRATEGY CONSTRAINTS.

10.4.1 Contextual constraints.

10.4.2 Operational constraints.

CHAPTER 11: SAMPLE STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT.

11.1 The Process.

CHAPTER 12: IMPLEMENTING STRATEGY.

Action Plan Intermediate Goals.

Action Plan Metrics.

Re-engineering.

Inadequate Performance.

12.1 Elements Of Strategy.

12.1.1 Policy Development.

Attributes of Good Policies.

Sample Policy Development.

Other Policies.

12.1.2 Standards.

Attributes of Good Standards.

Sample Standards.

Classifications.

Standard Statement.

CHAPTER 13: SECURITY PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT METRICS.

13.1 Information Security Program Development Metrics.

13.2 Program Development Operational Metrics.

CHAPTER 14: INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGEMENT METRICS.

14.1 Management Metrics.

14.2 Security Management Decision Support Metrics.

14.4 CISO Decisions.

14.2.1 Strategic alignment.

14.2.2 Risk Management.

14.2.3 Metrics for Risk Management.

14.2.4 Assurance Process Integration.

14.2.5 Value Delivery.

14.2.6 Resource Management.

14.2.7 Performance Measurement.

14.7 Information Security Operational Metrics.

14.3.1 IT and Information Security Management.

14.3.2 Compliance Metrics.

CHAPTER 15: INCIDENT MANAGEMENT AND RESPONSE METRICS.

15.1 Incident Management Decision Support Metrics.

Conclusion.

Appendix A. SABSA Business Attributes & Metrics.

Appendix B. Cultural Worldviews.

Heirarchists.

Egalitarians.

Individualists.

Fatalists.

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