The Informers

The Informers

by Bret Easton Ellis
3.6 37

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Overview

The Informers by Bret Easton Ellis

This powerful and poignant novel of L.A., from the author of Less Than Zero and American Psycho, depicts a generation's overwhelming dissatisfaction with the way things are, and its insistence on remaining as detached and isolated as possible.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780330536325
Publisher: Picador USA
Publication date: 04/28/2011

About the Author

Bret Easton Ellis is the author of Less Than Zero, The Rules of Attraction, American Psycho, The Informers, GlamoramaLunar Park, and Imperial Bedrooms. His works have been translated into twenty-seven languages. Less Than Zero, The Rules of Attraction, American Psycho, and The Informers have all been made into films. He lives in Los Angeles.

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The Informers 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 37 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
First, let me note, this is the first Ellis book I have ever finished. As a fan of Chuck Palahniuk, I feel like I should enjoy this author, but it has been a long and arduous path to finding something that kept me turning the pages. This collection of short stories and wonderfully shallow, mostly affluent narrators was just what I was looking for. The wretched and miserable lives kept me hooked. Then, when I felt that the narratives would never cross the line into deeply disturbing transgressive literature, chapter 10 and 11 rattled me to the core! I really enjoyed reading this collection; however, a couple of the stories did have me checking how many pages were left in the chapter more than once. It just goes to show that they can' t all be winners! Regardless, I suggest this collection to anyone who enjoys the genre. Now, I'll reward myself by catching the film adaptation on NetFlix, even if it does omit Chapter 10 (from what I hear).
Aimee_Leon More than 1 year ago
This book was not that great, but not awful. It started out okay, but not thrilling. As the stories moved on some of them got thrilling. Some of the short stories were interesting,dark, & thrilling at it points. But some were also boring and tedious. For instance Anne stupid letters to some guy. That story was a waste of time. As for the vampire one that was pretty cool. I enjoyed that one alot. Even though I didn't think this books deserved top stars like his other books as Less than Zero, American Psyco & Lunar Park. But I'd recommend others to read it. Brett Easton Ellis has recaptured LA 80's scene beautifully in The Informers. His settings is one of the reasons why I love his novels. As for the people were narrorated the book didn't sound so good.
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Ninja_Dog More than 1 year ago
In Ellis' fourth "novel," what we see is something like a novel, but lacking in narrative structure. "The Informers" is a collection of chapters only tangentially linked to one another through the social relationships of the protagonists. We catch vignettes of the usual Ellis-type suspects, including: a scandalous TV news anchor who's having an affair with a stepson, a heroin-addicted kidnapper who owes money to vampires, a woman trying to fall out of love to a drugged-out, yet beautiful man who's detached from both humanity and Earth as we know it, a philandering father who fails to find common ground with his son (who is one of Bateman's friends from American Psycho) through what few activities he has, a rock star who likes beating up on the groupies he has sex with, a Camden college student writing letters to a boy she's trying to fall out of love with (who might just be the main character from The Rules Of Attraction), and last (but certainly not least)... a carousing vampire who preys on adolescent club-going women. While most of these characters have some form of relationship to one another, it serves only as a link between one chapter and another in terms of a loose society. What these characters truly share in common is that they're rich, strikingly beautiful, unfettered by obligation and completely devoid of a moral compass. The ennui they encounter is a direct result of their traits, yet they can't quite put a finger on what's wrong. Prior to this novel, Ellis' best portrayal of this kind of socioeconomic moral depression was in his first novel, "Less Than Zero." Here, we see the idea developed even further, but at the expense of a coherent narrative, both across the book and within the chapters. Conflicts are presented, but rarely resolved in each chapter. As a "novel," the intensity of the chapters only escalates, though we see characters referenced in earlier chapters near the end. However, the seasoned Ellis reader will likely tell you that this unresolved ennui is not only deliberate, but entirely effective in this author's world. You are presented with spoiled non-heroes who have everything outside and nothing inside; when a problem occurs, it just keeps getting worse and no moral is gleaned or lesson learned. This brutal hopelessness and uncomfortable ambiguity is Ellis' comfort zone, and for this reason, "The Informers" largely succeeds. My only complaint with "The Informers" is that it is marketed as a novel. I truly believe that if people were to approach this read with the notion that each chapter is a separate experience, they would be more satisfied with it. I can't even imagine what the movie adaptation must be like, as this "novel" lacks the kind of narrative structure necessary for a coherent screenplay. then again, from what I've heard, the movie wasn't coherent! Nonetheless, if you read "The Informers" as a showcase of Ellis' short stories, I think you will be perfectly satisfied with what you read.