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The Innocence of Father Brown
     

The Innocence of Father Brown

3.2 23
by G. K. Chesterton
 

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Contents


The Blue Cross
The Secret Garden
The Queer Feet
The Flying Stars
The Invisible Man
The Honour of Israel Gow
The Wrong Shape
The Sins of Prince Saradine

Overview

Contents


The Blue Cross
The Secret Garden
The Queer Feet
The Flying Stars
The Invisible Man
The Honour of Israel Gow
The Wrong Shape
The Sins of Prince Saradine
The Hammer of God
The Eye of Apollo
The Sign of the Broken Sword
The Three Tools of Death





The Blue Cross

Between the silver ribbon of morning and the green glittering ribbon of
sea, the boat touched Harwich and let loose a swarm of folk like flies,
among whom the man we must follow was by no means conspicuous--nor
wished to be. There was nothing notable about him, except a slight
contrast between the holiday gaiety of his clothes and the official
gravity of his face. His clothes included a slight, pale grey jacket,
a white waistcoat, and a silver straw hat with a grey-blue ribbon. His
lean face was dark by contrast, and ended in a curt black beard that
looked Spanish and suggested an Elizabethan ruff. He was smoking a
cigarette with the seriousness of an idler. There was nothing about him
to indicate the fact that the grey jacket covered a loaded revolver,
that the white waistcoat covered a police card, or that the straw hat
covered one of the most powerful intellects in Europe. For this was
Valentin himself, the head of the Paris police and the most famous
investigator of the world; and he was coming from Brussels to London to
make the greatest arrest of the century.

Flambeau was in England. The police of three countries had tracked the
great criminal at last from Ghent to Brussels, from Brussels to the Hook
of Holland; and it was conjectured that he would take some advantage of
the unfamiliarity and confusion of the Eucharistic Congress, then
taking place in London. Probably he would travel as some minor clerk
or secretary connected with it; but, of course, Valentin could not be
certain; nobody could be certain about Flambeau.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013081192
Publisher:
SAP
Publication date:
08/25/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
208 KB

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The Innocence Of Father Brown 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
gaele More than 1 year ago
AudioBook Review: Stars: Overall 4 Narration 5 Story 4 One of the early, non-professional investigators of crime, Father Brown, as imagined by G.K. Chesterton carry much of a similar tone as the more famous Holmes mysteries of Arthur Conan Doyle. In fact, the two were acquainted, and you can see some similarities in pacing and intelligence. Chesterton is viewed by some as a Christian apologist: and to be honest the early stories here do often dance on the edges with this collection, an almost concerted effort to prove Catholicism is not remotely tied to superstition, myth or fantastical beliefs. If you can move past the preachiness of the good Father and appreciate his almost naïve belief in people and his use of intuition and a lifetime spent hearing confessions, you can enjoy the unique twists demonstrated during his investigations. Seven of these stories are pure murder mystery that highlight some rather complex circumstances, often mired in the prejudices and restrictions that came with the British class system. The Secret Garden is a wonderful example of the twists and turns, and the Father’s rather unique path to the solution. A further two stories don’t have any real culprit, another few are thefts or attempted thefts. With a thorough grounding in place and time, which can mean some racially insensitive comments, the dismissive comments from the upper classes in regards to those who work for them. A wonderful collection when taken as is, just for enjoyment and a quiet escape from the everyday. Narration for this collection is provided by Gordon Griffin, my first introduction to his work, and the narration and performance was wonderful. Clear, precise enunciation that highlights the text and story flow help the stories move smoothly forward. His skill with presentation, awareness of audience and ease of delivery made this a wonderful listen, sure to please listeners who want to delve into mysteries from the early development of the genre. I received an AudioBook copy of the title from the publisher via AudioBook Jukebox for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This version seems to be missing the endings to some chapters.
Joel_M More than 1 year ago
Take Sherlock Holmes, lower his intelligence by half (leaving him as still smarter than average) and turn him into a bland Roman Catholic priest who happens to solve a lot of mysteries and you get Father Brown. Some of the mysteries he solves are complex, and the third person narration is occasionally witty (even sarcastic), but I would much rather read Sherlock Holmes or Dupin any day. The author's frequent pot-shots at Protestants/Protestantism are annoying too; some are witty but mostly they just come off as mean-spirited.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book has some good points. I like the fact that the main character is more like the priests I have known-- not perfect by any means, but certainly not the current fad of portraying them all as hypocritical dogmatists. The brevity of the stories is also welcome. They can each be easily read in one sitting. Generally entertaining in themselves, I found them also to be not unlike fables (parables?) in that each had a small moral to it (even if the moral was as simple as "Be good"). On the negative side, some of the stories are a bit bland. All in all, though, I would recommend the book.
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Too many typos
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Mark Krudwig More than 1 year ago
Chesterton's Father Brown stories are not as complex as those of Christie or Doyle, but they are easy reads on a summer afternoon. It's nice to have a collection of them in one ebook. However, the layout on this ebook is terrible. The lines consistently wrap in odd places on my Nook Color. The font looks like one of the old monospaced typewriter fonts.