Innumeracy: Mathematical Illiteracy and Its Consequences

Innumeracy: Mathematical Illiteracy and Its Consequences

by John Allen Paulos
3.2 12

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Innumeracy: Mathematical Illiteracy and Its Consequences 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book comes to mind almost every time I turn on the news or talk to people for an extended time. Its examples are so varied and unusual, the writing is so clear and witty, and the approach so refreshing and unpretentious that my attitude towards mathematics and its connection to the world has changed completely. Even my uncle. who received his Ph.D. in physics recently, loved this book, and so I'm buying copies for my many innumerate friends for Christmas.
eclectic_reader_stc More than 1 year ago
Paulos commentary on numbers and their use in our society hits right to the point of bringing intelligence and common sense back to the reader. This book does a gret job of giving the reader a benchmark from whihc to jusdge and compare the numbers and the emotion that today's media throughs at us. A great read and great perspective.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The only reason I had to read this book was for my High School project and let start off by saying after I finished the first chapter I was really intrigued on how numbers and mathematics collaborate with one another in everyday life but as I continued to read I found an arrogant pattern, that the author John Allen Paulos was trying to come across the importance of numbers but the book honestly bored me to death. If you are the type of person who enjoys science and numbers then go for it but it you are just looking for an interesting book to read it is not this one. In about 180 pages I felt like I was constantly reading a history book there were so many facts in each page and in each paragraph, it shouldn’t even been called a book it should be called a math textbook almost because a book is something enjoyable to read and in this book you are reading fact after fact after fact. As a reader I want to be able to connect to the book on some level and honestly I couldn’t. My advice is don’t buy the book if you are trying something new to read but if you love science then you will love this book. I would have to say my favorite part was only the first chapter and the ending because I was so pleased to be finished with it by the time I was done reading.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I was anticipating an attack by Paulos on innumeracy and its consequences and, eventually, I got one - about 2/3 of the way through the book. It is witty and interesting for the first 2/3 but I often found myself wanting to scream at him 'Get to the point already instead of showing off'. Good but not great.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I must start off by saying that I never would have chosen to read this book if it were not required by my high school. I found John Allen Paulos to be rather pompous. He seemed to be rather adamant in his belief that all people are ignorant. Throughout his writting he was incredibly repetitive. He would make a statement and follow by giving an example to demonstate the idea. Then he would follow with three more example on the same topic. In my opinion all of his main ideas could have been summed up in a few pages, rather than many long-winded chapters. My advice: If you are looking for a book to cure insomnia, you have chosen the right piece of literature.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was the most horriable book you will ever read in your life. I was required to read it for school. The author showed off and you really wanted to say get to the point already