ISBN-10:
0312398115
ISBN-13:
9780312398118
Pub. Date:
02/28/2003
Publisher:
Bedford/St. Martin's
instructor's Annotated Edition for Successful College Writing / Edition 2

instructor's Annotated Edition for Successful College Writing / Edition 2

by Kathleen T. McWhorter

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780312398118
Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's
Publication date: 02/28/2003
Edition description: Second Edition
Pages: 992
Product dimensions: 7.42(w) x 9.04(h) x 1.13(d)

About the Author

Kathleen T. McWhorter is professor emerita of humanities and former director of the Learning Skills Center at Niagara County Community College. She has also been on the faculty of the State University College at Buffalo. She is the author of a number of books on reading and writing skills for developmental students, including The Writer’s Selections, Fifth Edition (2008), Academic Reading, Sixth Edition (2007), Efficient and Flexible Reading, Eighth Edition (2008), Active Reading Skills, Second Edition (2008), and Reading Across the Disciplines: College Reading And Beyond, Third Edition (2007), as well as a composition reader, Seeing the Pattern: Readings for Successful Writing (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2006).

Table of Contents

Preface
Thematic Contents
To the Student
PART ONE: ACADEMIC QUICK START
1. Succeeding in College
Chapter Quick Start
STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS
Focus on Success
Manage Your Time

Organize a Writing and Study Area

Study Smarter

Manage Stress
CLASSROOM SKILLS

Polish Your Academic Image

Demonstrate Academic Integrity

Communicate with Your Instructor

Listen Carefully and Critically

Ask and Answer Questions

Work with Classmates

Take Effective Notes in Class

2. Writing in College

Chapter Quick Start
ACADEMIC WRITING: WHAT TO EXPECT

Expect Your Writing to Move from More Personal to Less Personal

Expect Your Writing to Take Different Forms

Expect to Use the Language of the Discipline

Expect to Use Standard American English

Expect to Use and Document Scholarly Sources

Expect to Collaborate with Classmates
WHY STRIVE TO IMPROVE YOUR WRITING SKILLS?

Writing Skills Help in College and in Your Career

Writing Facilitates Learning and Recall

Writing Clarifies Your Thinking

Writing Helps You Solve Problems
DEVELOPING STRATEGIES FOR WRITING

Start with a Positive Attitude

Use your Course Syllabus

Use the Right Learning Tools

Use the College Writing Center

Keep a Writing Journal

Get the Most out of Writing Conferences

Assessing Your Learning Style

What Is Your Learning Style?
LEARNING STYLE INVENTORY

Interpreting Your Scores

A Word About Your Findings

How to Use Your Findings
APPLYING YOUR LEARNING STYLE TO YOUR WRITING

3. Reading and Writing about Text

Chapter Quick Start
READING IN COLLEGE

Changing Some Misconceptions about Reading

A Guide to Active Reading

Preview before Reading

Read with a Purpose

Reading: Purse Snatching, Donna Lopiano

Review after Reading

Understanding Difficult Text and Visuals

Draw a Graphic Organizer

Read Visuals

Responding to Text

A Guide to Responding to text

Summarize to Check Your Understanding

Link the Reading to Your Own Experiences
Analyze the Reading

Using Your Learning Style
HOW TO APPROACH THE STUDENT ESSAYS IN THIS BOOK

How to Focus on Writing Features
STUDENTS WRITE

Reading: The Games We Play: Inequality in the Pro-Sports Workplace, Tracey Aquino (student essay)

PART TWO: STRATEGIES FOR WRITING ESSAYS
4. Prewriting: How to Find and Focus Ideas

Chapter Quick Start

Choosing and Narrowing a Topic

Choosing a Topic

Narrowing a Topic

Thinking about Your Purpose, Audience, and Point of View

Determining Your Purpose

Considering Your Audience
Choosing a Point of View

Discovering Ideas to Write About

Freewriting

Mapping

Brainstorming

Group Brainstorming

Questioning

Writing Assertions

Interviewing

Using the Patterns of Development

Visualizing or Sketching

Researching Your Topic
STUDENTS WRITE

Christine Lee’s Prewriting Strategies

5. Developing and Supporting a Thesis
Chapter Quick Start
What Is a Thesis Statement?
Developing Your Thesis Statement

Coming Up with a Working Thesis Statement

Writing an Effective Thesis Statement

Placing the Thesis Statement

Using an Implied Thesis
Supporting Your Thesis Statement with Evidence

Choosing Types of Evidence

Collecting Evidence to Support Your Thesis

Choosing the Best Evidence

Using Sources to Support Your Thesis
STUDENTS WRITE

Christine Lee’s Working Thesis
Working With Text

Reading: Pet Therapy for Heart and Soul, Kerry Pechter

6. Drafting An Essay

Chapter Quick Start
The Structure of an Essay
Organizing Your Supporting Details

Selecting a Method of Organization

Preparing an Outline or Graphic Organizer

Connecting Your Supporting Details with Transitions and Repetition
Writing Your Introduction, Conclusion, and Title

Writing a Strong Introduction

Writing an Effective Conclusion

Writing a Good Title
Drafting with a Computer
STUDENTS WRITE

Reading: The Reality of Real TV, Christine Lee (student essay)
Working with Text

Reading: Black Men and Public Space, Brent Staples

7. Writing Effective Paragraphs

Chapter Quick Start
THE STRUCTURE OF A PARAGRAPH
WRITING A TOPIC SENTENCE

A Topic Sentence Should Be Focused

A Topic Sentence May Preview the Organization of the Paragraph

A Topic Sentence Should Support Your Thesis

A Topic Sentence Should be Strategically Placed
INCLUDING SUPPORTING DETAILS

Effective Paragraphs Have Unity

Effective Paragraphs Are Well Developed

Effective Paragraphs Provide Specific Supporting Details

Details are Arranged Logically
USING TRANSITIONS AND REPETITION

Coherent Paragraphs Include Transitional Expressions

Coherent Paragraphs Include Repetition of Key Words
DICTION IN ACADEMIC WRITING
STUDENTS WRITE

Reading: The Reality of Real TV, Christine Lee (student essay): Paragraph Excerpt
WORKING WITH TEXT

8. Revising Content and Organization

Chapter Quick Start
Why Revise?
Useful Techniques for Revision

Using a Graphic Organizer for Revision
Key Questions for Revision

Analyzing Your Purpose and Audience

Analyzing Your Thesis, Topic Sentences, and Evidence

Analyzing Your Organization

Analyzing Your Paragraph Development
Working with Classmates to Revise Your Essay

How to Find a Good Reviewer

Suggestions for the Writer

Suggestions for the Reviewer
USING YOUR INSTRUCTOR’S COMMENTS

Revising an Essay Using Your Instructor’s Comments
Using Your Instructor’s Comments to Improve Future Essays
Considering Your Learning Style
STUDENTS WRITE

Reading: A Trend Taken Too Far: The Reality of Real TV, Christine Lee (student essay)

9. Editing Sentences and Words
Chapter Quick Start
Analyzing Your Sentences

Are Your Sentences Concise?

Are Your Sentences Varied?

Are Your Sentences Parallel in Structure?

Do Your Sentences Have Strong, Active Verbs?
Analyzing Your Word Choice

Are Your Tone and Level of Diction Appropriate?

Do You Use Words with Appropriate Connotations?

Do You Use Concrete Language?

Do You Use Fresh, Appropriate Figures of Speech?

Evaluating Your Word Choice
Suggestions for ProofReading

Keeping an Error Log
STUDENTS WRITE
Excerpt from Christine Lee’s Edited Second Draft

PART THREE: PATTERNS OF DEVELOPMENT

10. Narration: Recounting Events

Chapter Quick Start
Writing a Narrative
What Is Narration?

Reading: Right Place, Wrong Face, Alton Fitzgerald White

Characteristics of a Narrative

Visualizing a Narrative: A Graphic Organizer

Reading: Selling Civility, Peter Scott
Integrating a Narrative into an Essay
A GUIDED WRITING ASSIGNMENT

The Assignment

Generating Ideas

Evaluating Your Ideas

Developing Your Thesis

Organizing and Drafting

Analyzing and Revising

Editing and Proofreading
STUDENTS WRITE

Reading: You Can Count on Miracles, Aphonetip Vasavong (student essay)
Reading a Narrative
Working with Text: Reading Narratives
Thinking Critically about Narration

Reading: Selling in Minnesota, Barbara Ehrenreich

Reading: Another Mother’s Child: A Letter to a Murdered Son, Norma Molen (patterns combined)
Applying Your Skills: Additional Essay Assignments

11. Description: Portraying People, Places, and Things

Chapter Quick Start
Writing a Description
What Is Description?
Reading: Eating Chili Peppers, Jeremy MacClancy
Characteristics of Descriptive Writing
Visualizing a Description: A Graphic Organizer

Reading: Inferior Decorating, Amy Tan
Integrating Description into an Essay
A GUIDED WRITING ASSIGNMENT

The Assignment

Generating Ideas and Details

Evaluating Your Details

Creating a Dominant Impression

Organizing and Drafting

Analyzing and Revising

Editing and Proofreading
STUDENTS WRITE

*Reading: Heatstroke with a Side of Burn Cream, Ted Sawchuck (student essay)

Reading a Description
Working with Text: Reading Descriptive Essays
Thinking Critically about Description

*Reading: Shipwreck, Cat Bohannon


*Reading
: Bloggers Without Borders…, Riverbend (patterns combined)

Applying Your Skills: Additional Essay Assignments

12. Illustration: Explaining With Examples

Chapter Quick Start
Writing an Illustration Essay
What Is Illustration?

Reading: Rambos of the Road, Martin Gottfried

Characteristics of Illustration Essays

Visualizing an Illustration Essay: A Graphic Organizer

*Reading:
Geeks in the Clubhouse, Tim Gideon and Jeff Pearlman
Integrating Illustration into an Essay
A GUIDED WRITING ASSIGNMENT

The Assignment

Generating Ideas

Developing Your Thesis

Choosing and Evaluating Your Examples

Organizing and Drafting

Analyzing and Revising

Editing and Proofreading
STUDENTS WRITE

*Reading:
Conforming to Stand Out: A Look at American Beauty, Nick Ruggia (student essay)

Reading an Illustration Essay
WORKING WITH TEXT: READING ILLUSTRATION ESSAYS
Thinking Critically about Illustration

Reading: Goin’ Gangsta, Choosin’ Cholita: Claiming Identity,Nell Bernstein

Reading: Words That Wound, Kathleen Vail (patterns combined)
Applying Your Skills: Additional Essay Assignments

13. Process Analysis: Explaining How Something Works or Is Done

Chapter Quick Start
Writing a Process Analysis
What Is Process Analysis?

*Reading:
How to Use Online Dating Sites, Ed Grabianowski

*Reading:
How Internet Search Engines Work, Curt Franklin
Characteristics of Process Analysis Essays

Visualizing a Process Analysis Essay: A Graphic Organizer
Integrating Process Analysis into an Essay
A GUIDED WRITING ASSIGNMENT

The Assignment

Selecting a Process

Developing Your Thesis

Listing the Steps and Gathering Details

Evaluating Your Ideas and Thesis

Organizing and Drafting

Analyzing and Revising

Editing and Proofreading
STUDENTS WRITE

*Reading: Feed Your Friends . . . and Their Friends . . . and Their Friends: Chili for Fifty, Eric Michalski (student essay)

Reading a Process Analysis
Working with Text: Reading Process Analysis Essays
Thinking Critically about Process Analysis

Reading: Remote Control: How to Raise a Media Skeptic, Susan Douglas

*Reading:
Panacea, Dorothy Allison (patterns combined)
Applying Your Skills: Additional Essay Assignments

14. Comparison and Contrast: Showing Similarities and Differences

Chapter Quick Start
Writing a Comparison or Contrast Essay
What Are Comparison and Contrast?

*Reading:
Amusing Ourselves to Death: Is The Onion Our Most Intelligent Newspaper?, Greg Beato

Reading: Dearly Disconnected, Ian Frazier
Characteristics of Comparison or Contrast Essays

Visualizing a Comparison or Contrast Essay: Two Graphic Organizers

Reading: Who’s Eating What, and Why, in the United States and Europe? Thomas Kinnear, Kenneth Bernhardt, and Kathleen Krentler

Integrating Comparison and Contrast into an Essay
A GUIDED WRITING ASSIGNMENT

The Assignment

Generating Ideas

Developing Your Thesis

Evaluating Your Ideas and Thesis

Organizing and Drafting

Analyzing and Revising

Editing and Proofreading
STUDENTS WRITE

Reading: Border Bites, Heather Gianakos (student essay)
Reading Comparison and Contrast
Working with Text: Reading Comparison or Contrast Essays
Thinking Critically about Comparison and Contrast

Reading: His Marriage and Hers: Childhood Roots, Daniel Goleman

Reading: Defining a Doctor, with a Tear, a Shrug, and a Schedule, Abigail Zuger (patterns combined)
Applying Your Skills: Additional Essay Assignments

15. Classification and Division: Explaining Categories and Parts

Chapter Quick Start
Writing a Classification or Division Essay
What Are Classification and Division?

*Reading:
My Life on the McJob: Fast Food Managers, Jerry Newman

Characteristics of Classification and Division Essays

Visualizing a Classification or Division Essay: A Graphic Organizer

Reading: A Brush with Reality: Surprises in the Tube, David Bodanis
Integrating Classification or Division into an Essay
A GUIDED WRITING ASSIGNMENT

The Assignment

Generating Ideas

Developing Your Thesis

Evaluating Your Ideas and Thesis

Organizing and Drafting

Analyzing and Revising

Editing and Proofreading
STUDENTS WRITE

*Reading: Immigration: Legal and Illegal, Sunny Desai (student essay)

Reading a Classification or Division Essay
Working with Text: Reading Classification or Division
Thinking Critically about Classification and Division

Reading: Territoriality, Joseph A. DeVito

*Reading:
The Dog Ate My Disk, and Other Tales of Woe, Carolyn Foster Segal (patterns combined)
Applying Your Skills: Additional Essay Assignments

16. Definition: Explaining What You Mean
Chapter Quick Start
Writing a Definition
What Is a Definition?

*Reading:
Freegans at Work, Sarah Dowdey

Characteristics of Extended Definitions

Visualizing an Extended Definition Essay: A Graphic Organizer

*Reading:
Latin Lingo, Ilan Stavans
Integrating Definitions into an Essay
A GUIDED WRITING ASSIGNMENT

The Assignment

Generating Ideas

Developing Your Thesis

Evaluating Your Ideas and Thesis

Organizing and Drafting

Analyzing and Revising

Editing and Proofreading
STUDENTS WRITE

Reading: Leveling the Playing Field: The NFL Salary Cap, David Harris (student essay)
Reading Definitions
Working with Text: Reading Definitions
Thinking Critically about Definition

Reading: Dude, Do You Know What You Just Said? Mike Crissey

*Reading:
The Animal Kingdom Storms Reality TV and the Documentary Industry, Alicia Rebensdorf (patterns combined)
Applying Your Skills: Additional Essay Assignments

17. Cause and Effect: Using Reasons and Results to Explain

Chapter Quick Start
Writing a Cause-and-Effect Essay
What Are Causes and Effects?

*Reading:
Can Diet Help Stop Depression and Violence?, Jurriaan Kamp
Characteristics of Cause-and-Effect Essays

Visualizing Cause-and-Effect Essays: Three Graphic Organizers

*Reading:
Sprawl Is Harmful to Wildlife, Jutka Terris
Integrating Cause and Effect into an Essay
A GUIDED WRITING ASSIGNMENT

The Assignment

Generating Ideas

Gathering Evidence

Developing Your Thesis

Evaluating Your Ideas and Thesis

Organizing and Drafting

Analyzing and Revising

Editing and Proofreading
STUDENTS WRITE

Reading: An Early Start, Harley Tong (student essay)
Reading Cause-and-Effect Essays
Working with Text: Reading Causal analyses
Thinking Critically about Cause and Effect

Reading: Part-Time Employment Undermines Students’ Commitment to School, Laurence Steinberg

Reading: Hitting the "Granite Wall," Gary M. Stern (patterns combined)
Applying Your Skills: Additional Essay Assignments

PART FOUR: READING AND WRITING ARGUMENTS

18. Reading Arguments

Chapter Quick Start
THE BASIC PARTS OF AN ARGUMENT

Reading: When Volunteerism Isn’t Noble, Lynn Steirer

The Issue

The Claim

The Support

The Refutation
GENERAL STRATEGIES FOR READING ARGUMENTS

Before You Read

Reading: Economic Affirmative Action, Ted Koerth

While You Read

Strategies for Following the Structure of an Argument

Using a Graphic Organizer

Writing a Summary

Strategies for Analyzing and Evaluating an Argument

Analyzing the Elements of and Reasoning in an Argument
THINKING CRITICALLY ABOUT ARGUMENT
APPLYING YOUR SKILLS: ADDITIONAL READINGS

Reading: How Much Is That Kidney in the Window? Bruce Gottlieb

Reading: "Strip-Mining" the Dead: When Human Organs Are for Sale, Gilbert Meilaender
INTEGRATING THE READINGS

19. Writing Arguments

Chapter Quick Start
WRITING AN ARGUMENT

What Is an Argument?

Reading: Abolish the Penny, William Safire

Characteristics of Argument Essays

Visualizing an Argument Essay: A Graphic Organizer

Reading: Not White, Just Right, Rachel Jones
A GUIDED WRITING ASSIGNMENT

The Assignment

Generating Ideas and Writing Your Thesis

Developing Your Thesis and Making a Claim

Evaluating Your Ideas, Evidence, and Claim

Considering Opposing Viewpoints

Organizing and Drafting

Analyzing and Revising

Editing and Proofreading
STUDENTS WRITE

Reading: AIDS and You: A World Crisis and Its Local Effects, Stanford DeWinter (student essay)
READING AN ARGUMENT
WORKING WITH TEXT: RESPONDING TO ARGUMENTS
Reading: Would You Buy a Car That Looked Like This? Andrew Simms

Reading: Why Consumers Have Been Choosing SUVs, John Merline
INTEGRATING THE READINGS
APPLYING YOUR SKILLS: ADDITIONAL ESSAY ASSIGNMENTS

PART FIVE: WRITING WITH SOURCES

20. Planning a Paper with Sources

Chapter Quick Start
WHEN SHOULD YOU USE SOURCES?

Using Sources to Add Detail to an Essay

Using Sources to Write a Research Paper
PLANNING YOUR PAPER

Defining the Assignment

Choosing an Interesting and Workable Topic

Narrowing and Discovering Ideas about Your Topic

Writing a Working Thesis and Listing Research Questions
CHOOSING AND EVALUATING USEFUL SOURCES

Choosing between Print and Electronic Sources

Choosing Relevant Sources

Choosing Reliable Sources

Evaluating Internet Sources
ANALYZING AND THINKING CRITICALLY ABOUT SOURCES

Separating Facts from Opinions

Identifying Bias or Viewpoint

Recognizing Generalizations

Identifying Assumptions
WORKING WITH TEXT: READING SOURCES

Scanning a Source

Skimming a Source

Reading a Source Closely

Improving Your Reading of Electronic Sources

21. Finding Sources and Taking Notes

Chapter Quick Start
AN OVERVIEW OF LIBRARY SOURCES

Learning Your Way around the Library

Locating Useful Library Sources
RESEARCH AND THE INTERNET

The World Wide Web

Listservs and Newsgroups

Email Addresses
EXTRACTING INFORMATION FROM SOURCES

Gathering Necessary Citation Information

Constructing an Annotated Bibliography
SYSTEMS OF NOTE-TAKING

Writing Summary Notes

Writing Paraphrases

Recording Quotations
AVOIDING PLAGIARISM

What Counts as Plagiarism

Cyberplagiarism
CONDUCTING FIELD RESEARCH

Interviewing

Using a Survey

Conducting Observations
FINDING SOURCES FOR YOUR OWN TOPIC

22. Writing a Paper Using Sources

Chapter Quick Start
ORGANIZING AND WRITING YOUR FIRST DRAFT

Evaluating Your Research and Synthesizing Information

Planning Your Organization

Drafting Your Research Paper
INTEGRATING INFORMATION FROM SOURCES

Deciding What to Document

Writing In-Text Citations

Using Quotations Appropriately
REVISING YOUR RESEARCH PAPER

Analyzing and Revising Your Paper as a Whole

Analyzing and Revising Paragraphs and Sentences
PREPARING YOUR FINAL DRAFT

Formatting Your Paper

Editing and ProofReading Your Paper

Documenting your Sources: MLA Style

MLA Style for In-Text Citations

MLA Style for the List of Works Cited

Documenting your Sources: APA Style

APA Style for In-Text Citations

APA Style for the List of References
STUDENTS WRITE

Reading: Do Animals Have Emotions? Nicholas Destino (student essay)

PART SIX: ACADEMIC APPLICATIONS

23. Reading and Writing about Literature

Chapter Quick Start

Reading: The Bean Eaters, Gwendolyn Brooks

A GENERAL APPROACH TO READING LITERATURE
THE LANGUAGE OF LITERATURE

Similes, Metaphors, and Personification

Symbols

Irony
ANALYZING SHORT STORIES

Reading: The Secret Lion, Alberto Ríos

Setting

Characters

Point of View

Plot

Theme

Reading: The Story of an Hour, Kate Chopin
ANALYZING POETRY

Reading: Two Look at Two, Robert Frost

Reading: Filling Station, Elizabeth Bishop
WHAT IS LITERARY ANALYSIS?

Characteristics of Literary Analysis
A GUIDED WRITING ASSIGNMENT

The Assignment

Generating Ideas

Evaluating Your Ideas

Developing Your Thesis

Organizing and Drafting

Analyzing and Revising

Editing and Proofreading
STUDENTS WRITE

Reading: The Keeping of "The Secret Lion," Andrew Decker (student essay)

24. Essay Examinations, Portfolios, and Oral Presentations

Chapter Quick Start
ESSAY EXAMINATIONS
PREPARING FOR ESSAY EXAMS

Write Study Sheets That Synthesize Information

Predict Essay Exam Questions

Draft Answers in Outline Form

Reduce Informal Outlines to Key-Word Outlines
TAKING ESSAY EXAMS

Some General Guidelines

Analyzing Essay Exam Questions

Writing Essay Answers
STUDENTS WRITE

Essay Exam Response

Thinking Critically about Essay Exams
PORTFOLIOS
CREATING A WRITING PORTFOLIO
Purposes of a Writing Portfolio

Deciding What to Include

Using Your Course Syllabus as a Guide

Organizing Your Portfolio

Choosing Pieces to Include

Writing the Introductory Letter or Essay
STUDENTS WRITE

The Portfolio Assignment

Sample Reflective Essay
GIVING ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Planning Your Presentation

Organizing and Drafting Your Presentation

Rehearsing Your Presentation

Overcoming Apprehension

Delivering an Effective Presentation

INDEX

* new to this edition

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