Interpretation of Murder

Interpretation of Murder

by Jed Rubenfeld
3.4 27

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Overview

Interpretation of Murder by Jed Rubenfeld

International Bestseller

#1 U.K. Bestseller

The Wall Street Journal Bestseller

Los Angeles Times Bestseller

In the summer of 1909, Sigmund Freud arrived by steamship in New York Harbor for a short visit to America. Though he would live another thirty years, he would never return to this country. Little is known about the week he spent in Manhattan, and Freud's biographers have long speculated as to why, in his later years, he referred to Americans as "savages" and "criminals."

In The Interpretation of Murder, Jed Rubenfeld weaves the facts of Freud's visit into a riveting, atmospheric story of corruption and murder set all over turn-of-the-century New York. Drawing on case histories, Shakespeare's Hamlet, and the historical details of a city on the brink of modernity, The Interpretation of Murder introduces a brilliant new storyteller, a novelist who, in the words of The New York Times, "will be no ordinary pop-cultural sensation."

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780312427054
Publisher: Picador
Publication date: 05/28/2007
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 464
Sales rank: 393,383
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.04(d)

About the Author

Currently a professor of law at Yale University, Jed Rubenfeld is one of this country's foremost experts on constitutional law. He wrote his Princeton undergraduate thesis on Sigmund Freud and studied Shakespeare at Julliard. He lives in Connecticut.

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Interpretation of Murder 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ive been looking for a while for that next book that made me excited for my morning commute and that was equally hard to put down once at the office. I even reread the girl with the dragon tatto series. Bu this was so great. The plot kept me turning pages, the heroes were extremely likable, and then there are the extra insights to early 20th century new york, psychoanalysis and shakespere. I loved it so much i read right through the authors note and all the extra notes at the end that most skip. The writing was fluid and insightful, i utterly loved it. Will be checking for other titles from the author in the future.
SuzyWatts More than 1 year ago
This fascinating story, which begins in New York in 1909, tells of the one and only visit of Sigmund Freud to the United States, and the problems he encounters during his time there. He arrives with two of his disciples, Carl Jung and Sandor Ferenczi, and is immediately embroiled in controversies surrounding his treatment and methods. A murder occurs, then an attack with similar characteristics happens on the following day, and Freud is asked to quiz the victim in an attempt to identify the attacker, but he passes the case to an American colleague. As the story unfolds, with many twists and turns, the protagonists are led a merry dance by the mastermind behind the crimes, and the reader will be kept in the dark until the very last page. Freud and Jung encounter great resistance to their ideas regarding psychoanalysis of patients and they are looked on with scepticism by the police and the medical profession. A sub plot sees Carl Jung trying to establish his particular brand of analysis, seeking to further his own career and move out of the shadow of his mentor, Freud. This causes tension between the two men, and misunderstandings arise between Freud and his American sponsors who have brought him to the country to publicize his theories through public appearances and speeches. Stratham Young, a physician and follower of Freud, is part of the welcoming committee, and becomes caught up in the criminal investigation, and becomes infatuated with one of the victims, thereby clouding his professional judgement. The character of Charles Hugel, the New York coroner, gives us an insight into the early days of forensic science and the difficulties of implementing this new branch of police detection. Apart from the constant ruminations by Stratham Young regarding Hamlet and the Oedipus complex, this is a very well written and informative book, and I recommend it highly.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Rubenfeld's portrayal of Carl Jung as a borderline psychotic is utterly absurd, but no more so than his fawning depiction of Freud 'who comes across as a kind of uber-Sherlock Holmes'. One wonders why Rubenfeld even bothered putting historical figures into his novel when they bore not a trace of resemblance to the actual men in question (the author's spurious claim to the contrary notwithstanding). The murder mystery itself is only passable, and the only reason for the inclusion of the first-person narrator is obviously so that Rubenfeld can supply descriptions of turn-of-the-century New York. The only characters possessing even an ounce of interest are the two N.Y. Police Detectives, whose interactions are laced with genuine humor. If Rubenfeld had chosen to concentrate his work on them, he might have come up with a moderately entertaining mystery. Alas, he did not.
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J-5 More than 1 year ago
Fantastic book. I've read a lot of historical fiction books. This is, very close to, if not the, best of them all. Original but not "contrived." It is an interesting book with roller-coaster thrills and spills. But the valley's are as interesting as the peaks are thrilling. Its intellectually stimulating as well as entertaining. I highly recommend this book.
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MargaretofBrighton More than 1 year ago
Very interesting if you know anything about Freud and Jung and/or their theories.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Oh how I wish that I had had the opportunity to have read this book sooner. While it has been stated by some that the book was written rather as discourse than a 'thriller,' Mr. Rubenfeld should pat himself on the back for accomplishing a most difficult feat: that of intertwining the mystery plot with psychological conventionalities,particularly of the given time period. I believe this book is not meant for everyone, given the notable extent of research evident in the intricacies of time, location, human behaviors, and the mysterious conundrum. With degrees in, both, Psychology and Eng/Ame Literature, I opine that the psychoanalytic concepts 'Oedipus relationships etc.' conversely gave impetus to the storyline's success. Through simplification of those concepts, Rubenfeld clinched the five W's within the web of mystery, enticing the anxious reader to follow through to the story's denouement. As for the reveiwer's' from the book club: it is perhaps to their advantage to take on a book with less complexities, maintaining a reading more suited to their level. I applaud you, Mr. Rubenfeld and await your future literary ventures.
Guest More than 1 year ago
What a great book, I couldn't put it down. The short chapters and changing viewpoints made it an interesting read. This book is a great mix of mystery and psychology. Expect to read and learn more about Freudian Psychology and psychoanalysis, hence, the storyline set around Freud's trip to the US in 1909. I highly recommend it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I tried to read this book..really I did. But it was just so boring and never really went anywhere. Eventually, gave up trying to read it.