ISBN-10:
0133806677
ISBN-13:
9780133806670
Pub. Date:
06/25/2014
Publisher:
Pearson
Introduction to PSpice for Electric Circuits / Edition 10

Introduction to PSpice for Electric Circuits / Edition 10

by James W. Nilsson, Susan Riedel

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780133806670
Publisher: Pearson
Publication date: 06/25/2014
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 144
Product dimensions: 6.80(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.40(d)

Read an Excerpt

ABOUT THIS MANUAL

Introduction to Pspice expressly supports the use of OrCAD PSpice A/D, Release 9.2 (herein after referred to as PSpice) as part of an introductory course in electric circuit analysis based on the textbook Introductory Circuits for Electrical and Computer Engineering. This supplement focuses on three things: (1) learning to draw and simulate linear circuits using PSpice, (2) constructing circuit models of basic devices such as op amps and transformers, and (3) learning to challenge computer output data as a means of reinforcing confidence in simulation. Because PSpice is designed to simulate networks containing integrated circuit devices, its range of application goes well beyond the topics covered in the textbook. Even though we do not exploit the full power of PSpice, we begin the introduction to this widely used simulation program at a level that you can use to test the computer solutions.

You may use PSpice to solve many of the textbook's Drill Exercises and Chapter Problems. Those Chapter Problems that we think are particularly suited to PSpice simulation are marked with an icon in the textbook. You are encouraged to use PSpice to check your solutions to Chapter Problems, or to further explorethe behavior of an interesting circuit.

INTEGRATING PSPICE INTO INTRODUCTORY CIRCUITS COURSES

Although some circuits courses cover PSpice as an independent topic, many instructors prefer to integrate computer solutions with the course. To support such integration topics appear in this supplement in the same order in which they are presented in the text. Table 1 summarizes the relationship between the supplement and the textbook.

ABOUT PSPICE

SPICE is a computer-aided simulation program that enables you to design a circuit and then simulate' the design on a computer. SPICE is the acronym for a Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis. The Electronics Research Laboratory of the University of California developed SPICE and made it available to the public in 1975.

Many different software packages are available that implement SPICE on personal computers or workstations. Among them, Orcad PSpice A/D, from Orcad, Inc., is the most popular. PSpice's popularity can be attributed to many factors, including its user-friendly interface, extensions to SPICE that support modeling of digital circuits and much more, and its no-cost basic version. This manual focuses on how to use Release 9.2, and all the examples were produced using this release. If you are using a different version of PSpice, or another package that implements SPICE, your interaction with the software may differ from what you see in this supplement.

We have included the Orcad Lite Version 9.2 in the back of this supplement. Insert the CD into your CD-ROM drive, and wait for the Orcad main menu to appear after a short animation. If the main menu is not displayed after one minute, choose the Start menu and enter D:\setup.exe, where "D" is the letter assigned to your CD-ROM drive.

Table of Contents

Preface.
1. A First Look At PSpice.
Drawing the Circuit. Specifying the Type of Circuit Analysis. Simulation Results.

2. Simple DC Circuits.
Independent DC Sources. Dependent DC Sources. Resistors.

3. DC Sweep Analysis.
Sweeping a Single Source. Sweeping Multiple Sources.

4. Additional DC Analysis.
Computing the Thevenin Equivalent. Sensitivity Analysis. Simulating Resistor Tolerances.

5. Operational Amplifiers.
Modeling Op Amps with Resistors and Dependent Sources. Using Op Amp Library Models. Modifying Op Amp Models.

6. Inductors, Capacitors, And Natural Response.
Transient Analysis. Natural Response.

7. The Step Response and Switches.
Simple Step Response. Piecewise Linear Sources. Realistic Switches.

8. Varying Component Values.
9. Sinusoidal Steady-State Analysis.
Sinusoidal Sources. Sinusoidal Steady-State Response.

10. Linear and Ideal Transformers.
Linear Transformers. Ideal Transformers.

11. Computing AC Power with Probe.
12. Frequency Response.
Specifying Frequency Variation and Number. Frequency Response Output. Bode Plots with Probe. Filter Design.

13. Fourier Series.
Pulsed Sources. Fourier Analysis.

14. Summary.
Bibliography.
Quick Reference to PSpice Netlist Statements.
Index.

Preface

ABOUT THIS MANUAL

Introduction to Pspice expressly supports the use of OrCAD PSpice A/D, Release 9.2 (herein after referred to as PSpice) as part of an introductory course in electric circuit analysis based on the textbook Introductory Circuits for Electrical and Computer Engineering. This supplement focuses on three things: (1) learning to draw and simulate linear circuits using PSpice, (2) constructing circuit models of basic devices such as op amps and transformers, and (3) learning to challenge computer output data as a means of reinforcing confidence in simulation. Because PSpice is designed to simulate networks containing integrated circuit devices, its range of application goes well beyond the topics covered in the textbook. Even though we do not exploit the full power of PSpice, we begin the introduction to this widely used simulation program at a level that you can use to test the computer solutions. You may use PSpice to solve many of the textbook's Drill Exercises and Chapter Problems. Those Chapter Problems that we think are particularly suited to PSpice simulation are marked with an icon in the textbook. You are encouraged to use PSpice to check your solutions to Chapter Problems, or to further explore the behaviorof an interesting circuit.

INTEGRATING PSPICE INTO INTRODUCTORY CIRCUITS COURSES

Although some circuits courses cover PSpice as an independent topic, many instructors prefer to integrate computer solutions with the course. To support such integration topics appear in this supplement in the same order in which they are presented in the text. Table 1 summarizes the relationship between the supplement and the textbook.

ABOUT PSPICE

SPICE is a computer-aided simulation program that enables you to design a circuit and then simulate' the design on a computer. SPICE is the acronym for a Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis. The Electronics Research Laboratory of the University of California developed SPICE and made it available to the public in 1975.

Many different software packages are available that implement SPICE on personal computers or workstations. Among them, Orcad PSpice A/D, from Orcad, Inc., is the most popular. PSpice's popularity can be attributed to many factors, including its user-friendly interface, extensions to SPICE that support modeling of digital circuits and much more, and its no-cost basic version. This manual focuses on how to use Release 9.2, and all the examples were produced using this release. If you are using a different version of PSpice, or another package that implements SPICE, your interaction with the software may differ from what you see in this supplement. We have included the Orcad Lite Version 9.2 in the back of this supplement. Insert the CD into your CD-ROM drive, and wait for the Orcad main menu to appear after a short animation. If the main menu is not displayed after one minute, choose the Start menu and enter D:\setup.exe, where "D" is the letter assigned to your CD-ROM drive.

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