ISBN-10:
0131244051
ISBN-13:
9780131244054
Pub. Date:
08/02/1994
Publisher:
Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference
Introduction to Quantum Mechanics / Edition 1

Introduction to Quantum Mechanics / Edition 1

by David J. Griffiths

Hardcover

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Overview

This book first teaches learners how to do quantum mechanics, and then provides them with a more insightful discussion of what it means. Fundamental principles are covered, quantum theory presented, and special techniques developed for attacking realistic problems. The book's two-part coverage organizes topics under basic theory, and assembles an arsenal of approximation schemes with illustrative applications.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780131244054
Publisher: Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference
Publication date: 08/02/1994
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 394
Product dimensions: 7.18(w) x 9.28(h) x 0.94(d)

Table of Contents

Preface vii
PART I THEORY
The Wave Function
1(19)
The Schrodinger Equation
1(1)
The Statistical Interpretation
2(3)
Probability
5(6)
Normalization
11(3)
Momentum
14(3)
The Uncertainty Principle
17(3)
The Time-Independent Schrodinger Equation
20(55)
Stationary States
20(4)
The Infinite Square Well
24(7)
The Harmonic Oscillator
31(13)
The Free Particle
44(6)
The Delta-Function Potential
50(10)
The Finite Square Well
60(6)
The Scattering Matrix
66(9)
Further Problems for Chapter 2
68(7)
Formalism
75(46)
Linear Algebra
75(20)
Function Spaces
95(9)
The Generalized Statistical Interpretation
104(4)
The Uncertainty Principle
108(13)
Further Problems for Chapter 3
116(5)
Quantum Mechanics in Three Dimensions
121(56)
Schrodinger Equations in Spherical Coordinates
121(12)
The Hydrogen Atom
133(12)
Angular Momentum
145(9)
Spin
154(23)
Further Problems for Chapter 4
170(7)
Identical Particles
177(44)
Two-Particle Systems
177(9)
Atoms
186(7)
Solids
193(11)
Quantum Statistical Mechanics
204(17)
Further Problems for Chapter 5
218(3)
PART II APPLICATIONS
Time-Independent Perturbation Theory
221(35)
Nondegenerate Perturbation Theory
221(6)
Degenerate Perturbation Theory
227(8)
The Fine Structure of Hydrogen
235(9)
The Zeeman Effect
244(6)
Hyperfined Splitting
250(6)
Further Problems for Chapter 6
252(4)
The Variational Principle
256(18)
Theory
256(5)
The Ground State of Helium
261(5)
The Hydrogen Molecule Ion
266(8)
Further Problems for Chapter 7
271(3)
The WKB Approximation
274(24)
The "Classical" Region
275(5)
Tunneling
280(4)
The Connection Formulas
284(14)
Further Problems for Chapter 8
293(5)
Time-Dependent Perturbation Theory
298(25)
Two-Level Systems
299(7)
Emission and Absorption of Radiation
306(5)
Spontaneous Emission
311(12)
Further Problems for Chapter 9
319(4)
The Adiabatic Approximation
323(29)
The Adiabatic Theorem
323(10)
Berry's Phase
333(19)
Further Problems for Chapter 10
349(3)
Scattering
352(22)
Introduction
352(5)
Partial Wave Analysis
357(6)
The Born Approximation
363(11)
Further Problems for Chapter 11
373(1)
Afterword 374(12)
Index 386

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Introduction to Quantum Mechanics 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
divisionbyzer0 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I don't like griffiths writing. His EM book is better than this one because if I'm not mistaken that is his pet field. I find him to be self-adulatory and annoying. This book is very much lacking on the quasiclassical prequantum material that led to the formation of quantum mechanics. David Bohm's book is far more comprehensive. French and Taylor's book is much deeper on physical insight, whereas griffith's book is mostly mathematics. This book left me unsatisfied and unconfident and unconvinced of quantum theory.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Griffiths' readable writing style makes this quantum mechanics text a poor substitute for a sleeping pill, unlike many other QM books. It IS a textbook, and there are no answers to even numbered problems in the back. Furter, some important concepts are left as problems for the reader to solve. Thus, I would not recommend this book for self study unless you're pretty sharp or have access to a QM expert who can check to ensure you've correctly deduced the important material left as problems. Some of the books many good points, besides its uncommon readability, are discussions of such interesting things as the EPR Paradox, Bell's Theorem, Measurment and The Quantum Zeno Paradox in the afterword. Since these are the things that any good student of QM is fascinatated by, these, along with other topics, provide the student with the motivation to progress farther in the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In Griffiths unique writing style, he wonderfully explains some of the basics of quantum mechanics for upperlevel undergraduates. I find his style easy to read on one's own with only a few minor shortcomings. A notable example is section 6.1. Pertubated Hamiltonians and energies appear to have 'powers' but are actually orders of correction. This was a little confusing from a student's point of view. I am greatful (as a homework solving student) of his rating of problem difficulty. Overall, I enjoyed the treatment and recommend it for a first quantum mechanics course after a good modern sequence.