The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime

The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime

by Judith Flanders
3.0 9

Hardcover(First Edition)

$26.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Monday, August 28 , Order now and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.
    Same Day delivery in Manhattan. 
    Details

Overview

The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime by Judith Flanders

THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

"Wonderful… [Flanders] shines in her readings of literary novels containing criminal and detective elements, such as Oliver Twist, Mary Barton and Tess of the D'Urbervilles, but can be sharp and very funny about the vagaries of melodramatic and sensational plotting." –Wall Street Journal

In this fascinating exploration of murder in the nineteenth century, Judith Flanders examines some of the most gripping cases that captivated the Victorians and gave rise to the first detective fiction

Murder in Britain in the nineteenth century was rare. But murder as sensation and entertainment became ubiquitous, transformed into novels, into broadsides and ballads, into theatre and melodrama and opera—even into puppet shows and performing dog-acts. Detective fiction and England's new police force developed in parallel, each imitating the other—the pioneers of Scotland Yard gave rise to Dickens's Inspector Bucket, the first fictional police detective, who in turn influenced Sherlock Holmes and, ultimately, even P.D. James and Patricia Cornwell.

In this fascinating book, Judith Flanders retells the gruesome stories of many different types of murder—both famous and obscure—from the crimes (and myths) of Sweeney Todd and Jack the Ripper to the tragedies of the murdered Marr family in London's East End; Burke and Hare and their bodysnatching business in Edinburgh; and Greenacre, who transported his dismembered fiancée around town by omnibus. With an irresistible cast of swindlers, forgers, and poisoners, the mad, the bad and the dangerous to know, The Invention of Murder is both a gripping tale of crime and punishment, and history at its most readable.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781250024879
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
Publication date: 07/23/2013
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 576
Sales rank: 551,214
Product dimensions: 6.66(w) x 9.58(h) x 1.75(d)

About the Author

JUDITH FLANDERS is a New York Times bestselling author and one of the foremost social historians of the Victorian era. Her book Inside the Victorian Home was shortlisted for the British Book Awards History Book of the Year. Judith is a frequent contributor to the Daily Telegraph, Guardian, Spectator, and the Times Literary Supplement. She lives in London.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
JohnTCullenAuthor More than 1 year ago
The writing is excellent, the editing fine, the analysis thorough, the vision far-reaching. I have thoroughly enjoyed this fine book, and plan to use it as a reference work for many years.
kcladyz More than 1 year ago
When I purchased this book I was expecting a novel discussing how Crime was investigated in the Victorian era but all this book does Stella story of a murderer and how it became a play no mention on how crime is investigated and no mention of investigative techniques of the Victorian era which is what I expected
3654745 More than 1 year ago
This book is terrible, boring recitations of facts does not make a compelling history book. As for insightful commentary there is barely enough here to fill an article let alone a book. A very disappointing book, don't waste your time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I gave this book 1 star because I couldn't give it no star. It is so boring. Simply page after page of every English newspaper article, book and play of the 1800s about a murder. No apparent effort by the author to reach any conclusion. Maybe that's on the last page but alas I'll never know because I quit reading half way through.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It may not be written in a very animated way, but it is very informative and interesting. Being intrigued by the macabre aspects of history, I absolutely loved it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
reads like a textbook