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Invisible Hunters: A Legend from the Miskito Indians of Nicaragua
     

Invisible Hunters: A Legend from the Miskito Indians of Nicaragua

by Harriet Rohmer, Joe Sam (Illustrator)
 
This Miskito Indian legend set in 17th-century Nicaragua illustrates the impact of the first European traders on traditional life.

Overview

This Miskito Indian legend set in 17th-century Nicaragua illustrates the impact of the first European traders on traditional life.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Mary Sue Preissner
This legend is presented in both English and Spanish on the same page. The story is about three Miskito Indian hunters and how their special gifts from the DAR (a mystical being) are corrupted by European settlers. The hunters (also brothers) promised the DAR they would never sell the hunted meat and only hunt in the traditional way with sticks. In return, the DAR gave them a piece of magic vine that made them invisible to the animals. The brothers are first persuaded by traders to "sell only what the villagers do not eat." They enjoy the riches brought by their success and begin to use guns, and abandon their village. In retaliation for broken promises, the DAR makes the hunters invisible to everyone, and the elders expel them from the village. The author includes information at the end of the book on his research. Coretta Scott King Honor Book 1987, Library Association Notable Children's Book 1987.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 3-6 A fascinating bilingual (English-Spanish) retelling of the legend of the Miskito hunters of Nicaragua, this is also the story of the effects on indigenous peoples when strangers from outside cultures come to give advice and change traditional tribal customs. Three hunters discover a magic vine which can make them invisible. The hunters learn from the Dar (the magic vine) that if they promise to hunt only with sticks and never sell the meat, but give it to their people, they can carry pieces of the Dar and become temporarily invisible. When they no longer hold the Dar, they are visible again. This works well until two strangers arrive with gifts and want to buy the meat. The three hunters are influenced by the strangers and in time their people do not have sufficient food. One day they become invisible and cannot become visible again, having broken their promise to the Dar. Some of the Miskito people say the invisible hunters still wander by the river, calling ``Dar, Dar, Dar.'' Striking primitive illustrations in deep contrasting colors and collage dramatize the changes in the hunters. This is one of very few books for children on the folklore of this Native American tribe of Central America. Louise Yarian Zwick, Houston Public Library

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780892390311
Publisher:
Lee & Low Books, Inc.
Publication date:
06/28/1987
Series:
Stories from Central America Series
Pages:
30
Product dimensions:
9.30(w) x 9.85(h) x 0.34(d)
Age Range:
6 Years

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