An Invitation to Sin

An Invitation to Sin

by Suzanne Enoch
3.7 23

NOOK Book(eBook)

$3.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Overview

An Invitation to Sin by Suzanne Enoch

Seven marriageable daughters . . . And Lord Zachary Griffin is just the man to help them.

After all, what could be more tantalizing than teaching the beautiful Witfeld sisters all the special ways of driving a man into submission—and marriage? And leading exquisite Caroline Witfeld, the most spirited and least frivolous sister, to temptation would be wildly delicious.

Zachary doesn't realize that Caroline's longing gazes have less to do with attraction and more to do with admission—to a prestigious arts conservatory. If only she could set those high cheekbones, that aristocratic brow, and those powerful shoulders to canvas, her dreams would all come true. But Caroline is soon having dreams of a very different sort—ones that involve the charming rogue and some improper behavior hardly befitting a lady dedicated to her art . . .unless she becomes dedicated to the art of love.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780061745263
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 10/13/2009
Series: Griffin Family , #2
Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 54,048
File size: 684 KB

About the Author

A native and current resident of Southern California, Suzanne Enoch loves movies almost as much as she loves books. When she is not busily working on her next novel, Suzanne likes to contemplate interesting phenomena, like how the three guppies in her aquarium became 161 guppies in five months.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Invitation to Sin (Griffin Family Series#2) 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
skelley55 More than 1 year ago
Not the best researched book on the subject of art, but I really liked Zachary and Caroline. So, if ou enjoy romance novels with humor, you should like this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
curlyloulou More than 1 year ago
This book had some really good moments and then some extra stuff that dragged on too long. When the story was about the two main characters it was good but dealing with all her stupid sisters and talking about cows was a little long winded. It wasn't bad but it wasn't great either.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
this book is by no means a masterpiece.... but then, its packaging includes copious amounts of satin drapery and a salacious view of a gartered stocking, so was i really expecting literary prowess? hm, perhaps not. as one reviewer pointed out, the book does attribute the famous painting of the Mona Lisa to Michaelangelo rather than Leonardo da Vinci. there are also some rather farfetched (or perhaps i should say under-reasearched) descriptions of paints, techniques, and supplies, and i'll admit that i did roll my eyes and mumble a little, but it hardly stopped me from reading. enoch is comfortable in her niche - this story is entertaining, the writing is good and the dialogue often witty. yes, the large family of giggling daughters, silly mother, and eccentric father are a cop off of Pride and Prejudice, but it's more homage than theft. caroline is at least believable (more than one can say for most romance heroines) and while she does dither a bit, she does so for our enjoyment. zachrey is set up to be the least decisive of the Griffin children and comes across as just such. its refreshing to have a 'hero' who isn't beating anyone over the head with his heroics - no runaway carraiges, no clandestine rescues, but an honest (well, perhaps 'contrived' would fit better) maturing makes him far more enjoyable than the grunting, alpha-male Thor-prototypes one usually finds. this novel is never going to be a rousing narrative of personal growth, or a shining example of high writing, but it is enjoyable. and funny. and, when all you want is a means of escape from an exhausting, boring day, that's really you need, isn't it?
Guest More than 1 year ago
An awful book! This book proclaims Michelangelo to be the painter of the Mona Lisa. I may not be an art history buff, but between common knowledge and the Da Vincci Code, the mistake is glaring. If you can ignore that repetitive falsehood, you remain uninterested in the content. But, do not be discouraged from all Enoch's books! Her novels on Samantha Jellicoe are hilarious and overall a better piece of writing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Having enjoyed all of Ms. Enoch's previous books, I was eager to read this sequel to Sin and Sensibility for another look at the Griffin family. Unfortunately, this tale of the youngest Griffin brother, Lord Zachary, and his involvement with the Witfeld family of Wiltshire (consisting of seven unmarried sisters, their hen-witted mother and long suffering father - shades of Pride and Prejudice!) did not live up to my expectations. Jane Austen didn't bother to do a sequel to the Bennett family and I hope Ms Enoch will not reprise the Witfelds. The only thing worse than this story would be to pair up the elder brother, Sebastian, Duke of Melbourne, with Caroline's 17-year old sister Anne. His 6-year old daughter deserves an adult stepmother!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've read everything Enouch writes but this was by far the worst of any book I have ever read. The 6 silly sister siblings were only matched by the 7th oldest sister-she was so boring and tedious and non-decisive it was painful to read. The hero wasn't one and the only inspiring adult character was a 6 year old! The story plodded along slower than the farm horses. Can't say enough about this book -unfortunately.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Lord Zachary Griffin accompanies his aunt on a trek to the Whitfield home where six marriage aged daughters reside. The sisters enjoy his company as Zachary is kind to each one. That is the siblings appreciate the young handsome gentleman¿s thoughtfulness except Caroline who sees the virtues of his body she wants to use Zachary as a model to finish a portrait that she believes will provide her admittance to attend an art academy. --- As Zachary tutors the young ladies in the art of men, he has his most fun with the serious Caroline teasing her with sensual innuendoes and images to whet her carnal appetite as he poses for her painting. As they talk and share desires and dreams they begin to fall in love, but she has her heart set on art school not a husband unless he can complete his courting of the reluctant artist. --- This is a terrific Regency romance starring a wonderful kindhearted hero, an intriguing hard to catch female and her sisters who want to dine with Zachary as the main course. The humorous story line is character driven with the sisters, each unique, adding escapades and depth to the relationship between the lead pair. Readers will enjoy this charming courtship and look forward to more sisterly escapades. --- Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
House of the sly and those who know how to get their way.