J2EE' Web Services / Edition 1

J2EE' Web Services / Edition 1

by Richard Monson-Haefel
4.5 2
ISBN-10:
0321146182
ISBN-13:
9780321146182
Pub. Date:
11/03/2003
Publisher:
Addison-Wesley
Select a Purchase Option
  • purchase options
    $38.88 $69.99 Save 44% Current price is $38.88, Original price is $69.99. You Save 44%.
    icon-error
    Note: Access code and/or supplemental material are not guaranteed to be included with textbook rental or used textbook.
  • purchase options

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

J2EE' Web Services 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anil More than 1 year ago
Book is organized very good with very good exaplanation of contents. This is the only comprehensive book for a developer on webservices.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The alphabet soup subtitle gives a clue as to the book's heft: 'XML, SOAP, WSDL, UDDI, WS-I, JAX-RPC, JAXR, SAAJ, JAXP'. All these can be effectively summarised by the phrase 'Basic Profile 1.0'. This is needed for interoperability of any web service application you might be developing. It is a set of rules telling how to use XML, WSDL, SOAP and UDDI to make your application available as a Web service. If you don't know these 4 items, then basically you need to read most of the book, before being able to deploy an application. The chapters span 733 well written pages (plus there are large appendices). So be warned, it is not trivial to develop a Web service. The clarity of the writing helps assimilation, but the sheer bulk of the text seems necessary. On the positive side, now with BP 1, if you conform to it, your application should indeed work in a diverse environment. Such could not easily be said prior to it. Along the way, you may certainly wonder if the large amount of material needed to be understood is indicative of a still developing field. This barrier may be the single greatest impediment to Web service development. Certainly not the author's fault. He is explaining industry-wide agreed upon standards. Though in the last chapter, he does suggest along these lines that XML deployment descriptors used in J2EE are far too bulky and brittle.