Jack and the Box

Jack and the Box

by Art Spiegelman (Illustrator)

Hardcover

$12.95
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780979923838
Publisher: TOON Books
Publication date: 10/07/2008
Pages: 32
Product dimensions: 6.20(w) x 10.90(h) x 0.36(d)
Lexile: GN230L (what's this?)
Age Range: 4 - 8 Years

About the Author

Art Spiegelman is best known for his masterful two-volume Holocaust narrative, Maus, which in 1992 won a Pulitzer Prize. Born in Stockholm in 1948, Spiegelman rejected his parents' aspirations for him to become a dentist and he began to study cartooning in high school and drawing professionally at age 16. In 2005, he was named one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People. He was made a Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in France in 2005 and—the American equivalent—played himself on an episode of “The Simpsons” in 2008. He has published Meta Maus, a companion to The Complete Maus, which was awarded the National Jewish Book Award. In 2011, Art Spiegelman won the Grand Prix at the Angoulême International Comics Festival. His next book, CO-MIX: A Retrospective of Comics, Graphics, and Scraps, will be published by Drawn & Quarterly in September 2013. He lives in New York City, with his wife and collaborator, Françoise Mouly, TOON Books' Editorial Director.

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Jack and the Box 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
kayceel on LibraryThing 8 months ago
This is a simple introduction to comics for beginning readers. My daughter, almost 6, was initially insistent she couldn't read it - it's 32 pages long, and must have been rather intimidating. However, as I paged through it with her, pointing to each word in its turn (and perhaps showing her the proper way to "read" a comic), she quickly gained confidence. She now looks at it on her own, and I hear her reading it to herself.The story, word level, and art are all simple, but well done. Jack, a young bunny, receives a jack-in-the-box named Zack, who is very silly (and proud of it!). My daughter really enjoyed it!I definitely intend to check out the next couple of Toon books!
julieah on LibraryThing 8 months ago
An easy-to-read comic book, online Toon reader, Speigelman¿s Jack and the Box is a sure fire way to entertain young readers alike. Jack, a young bunny receives a new jack in the box, Zach, who ends up being more than he bargained for. Zach is an argumentative, mischievous, and fun-loving toy. When the fun gets out of hand, Zach does his best fix what has happened. The story is amusing and wacky. The cartoon-like artwork and comic book features make even more eye appealing for young children. Speigelman uses a great deal of word repetition and humor appropriate for such young audiences. This is a perfect book for any young elementary classroom (K-1). What makes this book even more appealing is the ability to read it online or even have the book read to you.
nzfj on LibraryThing 8 months ago
This is an interesting picture comic book. The art work is simple with limited color but very contrasting. Jack gets a toy present from his parents and slowly the present takes over Jack's room. After much playing and more characters jump out of the box, Jack's parents enter his bed room. Jack tells his parents fantastic tales about his new present and how it broke his lamp. Good book for 4+to 7+yrs. Good read aloud and journal and comic writing activity.
YouthGPL on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Kearsten says: This is a simple introduction to comics for beginning readers. My daughter, almost 6, was initially insistent she couldn't read it - it's 32 pages long, and must have been rather intimidating. However, as I paged through it with her, pointing to each word in its turn (and perhaps showing her the proper way to "read" a comic), she quickly gained confidence. She now looks at it on her own, and I hear her reading it to herself.The story, word level, and art are all simple, but well done. Jack, a young bunny, receives a jack-in-the-box named Zack, who is very silly (and proud of it!). My daughter really enjoyed it!I definitely intend to check out the next couple of Toon books!
delzey on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Earlier this year when the first batch of Toon titles came out I was less than enthused. The problem as I saw it then was that the titles seemed little more than traditional comic book fare with expensive paper, better printing, and hard covers. I couldn't reconcile the content with the cost and felt that they were best suited for libraries who would do well with studier bindings, not with the general consumer (picture book readers) who would tire of the titles quickly.Now with the second round of releases I'm finding this less to be the case, but its book specific. Spiegelman's Jack and the Box isn't merely " a first COMIC for brand-new readers" as it says on the cover, it's actually a subtle and sophisticated tool that helps introduce readers to the concepts in reading and understanding comics. It is a primer on comic literacy at the simplest level, and clever. I doubt Spiegelman could have delivered anything less.The book opens simply enough with a single illustration of Jack (Rabbit) being given a new toy. Two simple word balloons establish the order of both reading left-to-right and lead the viewer's eyes to follow the action accordingly. With a flip of the page we are now presented with a double page spread of four equal sized panels. There's the conflict of the first panel (Jack can't open it), the tension in the second panel (watching the box, waiting for something to happen), the action in the third panel (a clown pops out of the box, jack-in-the-box style, scaring Jack), and a punchline in the fourth panel ("Ha ha!" "What a silly toy!"). With a few words and some simple pictures a first encounter with a jack-in-the-box is turned into the core joke on which all future variations will be built. Since humor is generally derived from the unexpected turn, from the deviation from what is expected or established, Spiegelman can now train young comic readers to learn how to read for visual cues and verbal repetition. It's a winning combination and, to the casual reader, a subtle lesson in how to read comics.Jack now has a series of comic adventures with the toy, each four panels across the spreads, built on the idea of an uncooperative toy and its unexpected behavior. We've been told it is a very silly toy so we aren't surprised to see it talk back or misbehave. There's the slightest hint of Cat in the Hat style mischief, and a sense of a child's play world being realistic to the child but confusing to adults, which adds another layer to the book. As the comic stories add and build, and the chaos grows, there is a need for release at the end that comes in Jack explaining all that has transpired to his curious parents, the denouement so to speak. Order is restored, and Jack now safely has mastered the silly toy the same way the reader has mastered the complexities of a comic narrative.While there are other books out there for the picture book crowd that work within the comic framework (Regis Faller's Polo books, for example) there are few that work this hard, this effortlessly to train readers to the art of comic literacy. I hope that Toon continues to build off this lesson with their other titles.
ElizaJane on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Toon Books are a new set of graphic novels aimed at the emerging reader. They are written and illustrated by professional artists/authors and are wildly intriguing for the young reader. My son who is reading at a Gr. 2 level enjoyed these immensely. The three I am reviewing are the second and latest set (Aug. 2008) to be released.Jack in the Box by Art Spiegelman is printed in the traditional horizontal format of a picture book and is the easiest to read of these three. Large print and easy (K-1) vocabulary along with a funny story about a gift jack-in-the-box with a sense of humour; along with the wonderful illustrations make this an addictive read for children. If your child can read the title, they will be able to read the book. Lots of fun!As a parent I was thrilled with these enticing books that held my reluctant reader's interest and kept him reading page after page without any pressure from mum or dad to just try and read one more page. In fact we all liked them so much I've ordered the first three for Christmas presents this year and look forward to the next books that will published next year. These 'early readers' are a fabulous use of the graphic novel format.