The Jakarta Pandemic

The Jakarta Pandemic

by Steven Konkoly

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781495907371
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 02/12/2014
Series: Perseid Collapse Series
Pages: 348
Sales rank: 652,945
Product dimensions: 6.04(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.99(d)

About the Author

Steven Konkoly graduated from the United States Naval Academy and served on active duty for eight years with various Navy and Marine Corps units. He currently lives with his family in southern Maine, where he works for a major pharmaceutical company.

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Jakarta Pandemic 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
DJZook More than 1 year ago
I've read a lot of post-apocalyptic novels and am always looking for realism in how the disaster plays out and how the characters react. Steven Konkoly did a great job in realistically portraying how an extreme flu pandemic would affect those in suburbia. The viewpoint is purely from the main character's perspective - we learn no more about the pandemic than what he knows, and that lends great realism to the book. I also like that the main character is not some superhero - he is strong yet flawed in many ways. It's an enjoyable read and may also prompt you to stock up a little more next time you hit the grocery store.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm a big fan of disaster and zombie fiction...and this book was one of the best pandemic disaster novels I've read in a long time. Couldn't put it down!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you like end of the world prophecy you will love this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
KirkusMacGowan More than 1 year ago
Awhile back while searching for my next read, I came across The Jakarta Pandemic by Steven Konkoly. The name caught my attention so I read the book description. With the Swine Flu scare from a few years back still fresh in my mind, the premise behind The Jakarta Pandemic made it a must read. I tossed it on my miles long to-read list. The positive: Konkoly's best attribute in The Jakarta Pandemic was his realism. We see the trials the main character, Alex Fletcher, and his family must endure before, during, and after the worldwide pandemic. Konkoly details the preparations Alex makes including a back-up power system, dried food and its preparation, heating, and medications. While interesting, the neighborhood activities really draw the reader in. We're introduced to multiple neighbors and their own preparedness, their families, their children. Many books and movies often take on a massive view of how the world may react during a pandemic, but The Jakarta Pandemic focuses on Alex Fletcher's neighborhood while keeping the reader updated on the worldwide effects. The pacing was wonderful. I wondered how Konkoly would keep the reader interested for so long with such a narrow focus but I didn't once feel the story slow down. Whether I read about how his kids handled the stress from spending so much time inside, or how the neighbors who hadn't prepared became desperate, I couldn't wait to move on to the next paragraph to see how things turned out. The negative: A few simple things kept me from handing out a five star for The Jakarta Pandemic. While there were a few spelling and formatting errors, there were no more than typically found in a traditionally published book. However, the writing could have been much tighter in my opinion. For example, Konkoly's descriptions worked wonderfully most of the time, but on occasion, it felt as if he threw extra words in with no purpose. Not a huge deal by any means, but something that may improve a reader's experience drastically. In one particular scene, we learn Alex's wife drank her coffee from a "blue" mug. That's fine, but in this scene it added nothing. It's one of those details where if the author gave a reason why this blue mug was important, it might have added to the strength of that scene. Maybe it's the color of her alma mater or her favorite color since living near to the ocean for many years. Alternatively, the reader didn't need to know the color and it wouldn't have taken anything away. The reader has an imagination, let them use it! One other tidbit I thought was funny was the spelling of the word "okay." In every instance throughout the book, it's spelled using the letters, "O" and "K." It didn't draw me away from the story at all, but it did give me a giggle every time. I figure it gets the point across and saves space. Why change it? If The Jakarta Pandemic were cleaned up, I'd have no problem giving it five stars. If you're not the type of reader bothered by these little tidbits, I say give it a try. You won't be let down.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
KatZombie More than 1 year ago
The Jakarta Pandemic is a story of one of the most terrifying possibilities – a global flu pandemic racing across the world, devastating food supplies, electricity and telephone service, law and order, and most scary of all, medical care for those who have contracted the flu. Vigilant, organized and more than a little paranoid, Alex has been preparing for such an event, and has everything all planned. However, fear and hunger drive other less-prepared people around him to take desperate measures. The story doesn’t kick into high gear for quite a long time, but it still kept my interest – particularly the news reports and specialist interviews which give a lot of information on the beginning and progression of the pandemic across the globe and the preparations made by Alex and his family for their self-imposed quarantine. The main characters, Alex and Kate Fletcher, are both likeable, and their interactions are believable and sometimes even amusing (hard to achieve in a book with such a somber story), and the secondary characters are a perfect mixture of likeable, annoying and slightly creepy. And once things get dicey, their true colours emerge. The Jakarta Pandemic is well written – the dialogue is believable and fluid, the story is engaging and entertaining and the focus on the lead-up to the pandemic helps to build tension without being preachy. My one (very) minor criticism is the overly-detailed descriptions of the neighbourhood, what characters are wearing, and what they are eating etc – I don’t really need to know what colour pyjamas Kate was wearing every day! Overall, I really enjoyed The Jakarta Pandemic - I'd recommend it to PA fans, but also to anyone who enjoys a good, human story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well written, and a plausible scenerio . Enjoyed reading this one. Makes me want me want to go out and stock up on essential supplies.
Tim Pearson More than 1 year ago
This really was a great read! Very intense! Not only the "battles" but also including the authors writting of the day to day fear that they went through. As some one who has been "dabbling" in preparedness, this helped me look at things a little differently on a day to day basis. Excellent book!
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HeadshotHeather More than 1 year ago
A deadly pandemic flu is hitting the country and Alex Fletcher, an Iraq war veteran and now pharmaceutical representative has a problem. A big problem. His family is well prepared to hunker down for the winter to ride out the "storm" however most of the Fletcher's neighbors are not prepared at all. So when the hospitals start turning away the sick, the stores run out of supplies and the power goes out the desperation of Alex's neighbors and some recent unsavory characters who have recently overtaken some abandoned houses start showing up on Alex's doorstep and threatening his family's survival..both from the health issues of the country and from people they once called friends. The Jakarta Pandemic by Steven Konkoly is a very unique and, actually, fairly realistic look at what would happen within our community should a pandemic happen. People quarantining themselves and their families away from the outside world and some not taking the threat seriously and continuing to invite neighbors over to visit. Some families with more provisions for the long haul than others and some who did not prepare and who are now scavenging to survive. This need to scavenge to survive can turn into a desperation that leads to a person doing things they may never have done in their former lives. It can, also, open the door to those referred to as sociopaths to do what, in their minds, needs to be done in order for them to live.whether you do or not. Being set in a 30ish house suburban neighborhood, there are several characters within The Jakarta Pandemic some, of course, are more in the forefront of the story than others. The Fletcher family was a typical family with their teasing and banter. Alex's wife was a bit on the annoying side to me and there is one scene in the story where I stopped reading and thought to myself If I did that to my husband, he would have had my ass.and rightfully so. Their neighbors Charlie and Ed are great characters, especially the hunter Charlie. As for the "bad guys", the author did an excellent job making you dislike and mistrust these characters. There was no doubt that they are to be unlikable. Having mentioned that I felt The Jakarta Pandemic was fairly believable. I would be remiss not mention that there were a couple of unbelievable moments, particularly at the end. Maybe not so much unbelievable, but very convenient for our protagonist.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the first book by I've read by Steven Konkoly.I was captivated from the beginning. I really enjoyed the character Alex. He was amusing. I throughly enjoyed his humor as well as his sarcasm. This read is also very sobering. The possibility of a pandemic is a real issue. This is a thought provoking book, full of good information.
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