Jane Austen's Rules of Romance: The Necessary Refinements and Situations for the Successful Procurement of the Marriageable Man

Jane Austen's Rules of Romance: The Necessary Refinements and Situations for the Successful Procurement of the Marriageable Man

by Ticia Blackburn

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781477272039
Publisher: AuthorHouse
Publication date: 10/16/2012
Pages: 134
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.31(d)

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Jane Austen's Rules of Romance

The Necessary Refinements and Situations for the Successful Procurement of the Marriageable Man
By Ticia Blackburn

AuthorHouse

Copyright © 2012 Patricia Blackburn
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-1-4772-7203-9


Chapter One

A Most Suitable Connection

Matrimony ... it is an engagement between man and woman, formed for the advantage of each; and that when once entered into, they belong exclusively to each other till the moment of its dissolution. That it is their duty, each to endeavor to give the other no cause for wishing that he or she bestowed themselves elsewhere and their best interest to keep their own imaginations from wandering towards the perfections of their neighbors, or for fancying that they should have been better off with any one else.

-Northanger Abbey

It is every body's duty to do as well themselves as they can.

-Mansfield Park

Every body should marry as soon as they can do it to advantage.

-Mansfield Park

In marriage, the man is supposed to provide for the support of the woman; the woman to make the home agreeable to the man; he is to purvey, and she is to smile.

-Northanger Abbey

The very material matrimonial point of submitting your own will, and doing as you are bid.

-Emma

A man would always wish to give a woman a better home than the one he takes her from.

-Emma

What one has left behind, I always say that is quite one of the evils of matrimony.

-Emma

Wherever you are you should always be contented, especially at home, because there you must spend the most of your time.

-Northanger Abbey

I consider everybody as having the right to marry once in their lives for love if they can.

-Letters

Do anything rather than marry without affection.

-Pride and Prejudice

All the felicity which a marriage of true affection could bestow.

-Pride and Prejudice

Anything is to be preferred or endured rather than marrying without affection; and if the deficiencies of manner etc. etc. strike you more than all his good qualities, if you continue to think wrongly of them, give him up at once.

-Letters

How wretched, and how unpardonable, how hopeless and how wicked it is to marry without affection.

-Mansfield Park

Nothing is to be compared to the misery of being bound without love, bound to one and preferring another. This is a punishment which you do not deserve.

-Letters

You could be neither happy nor respectable; unless you truly esteemed your husband ... your lively talents would place you in the greatest danger in an unequal marriage. You could scarcely escape discredit and misery.

-Pride and Prejudice

In marrying a man indifferent to me, all risk would have been incurred, all duty violated.

-Persuasion

In the very important concern of marriage especially, there is everything at stake; your own happiness, that of your parents, and credit of your name.

-Lady Susan

I do not think she would marry without love ... if there is a girl in the world capable of being uninfluenced by ambition, I can suppose it her.

Mansfield Park

A woman is not to marry a man merely because she is asked.

-Emma

To throw herself away ... in an engagement with a young man, who had nothing but himself to recommend him, and no hopes of attaining affluence.

-Persuasion

Let him have all the perfections in the world, I think it ought to be set down as certain, that a man must be acceptable to every woman he may happen to like himself.

-Mansfield Park

It is incomprehensible to a man that a woman should ever refuse an offer of marriage. A man always imagines a woman to be ready for anybody who asks her.

-Emma

Of matrimony and dancing ... in both man has the advantage of choice, woman only the power of refusal.

-Northanger Abbey

I consider a country-dance as an emblem of marriage, fidelity and complaisance are the principal duties of both; and those men who do not chose to dance or marry themselves, have no business with the partners or wives of their neighbors.

-Northanger Abbey

If a woman doubts as to whether she should accept a man or not she certainly ought to refuse him. If she can hesitate as to "yes," she ought to say "no" directly. It is not a state to be safely entered into with doubtful feelings, with half a heart.

-Emma

Where the mind is perhaps rather unwilling to be convinced, it will always find something to support its doubts.

-Sense and Sensibility

You must be the best judge of your own happiness. If you prefer Mr. Martin to every other person, if you think him the most agreeable man you have ever been in company with, why should you hesitate?

-Emma

If a girl likes another man better, it is very fit she should have him.

-Persuasion

I know it be the established custom of your sex to reject a man on the first application.

-Pride and Prejudice

It is usual with young ladies to reject the addresses of the man whom they secretly mean to accept, when he first applies for their favor; and that sometimes the refusal is repeated a second and even third time.

-Pride and Prejudice

Those young ladies (if such young ladies there are) who are so daring as to risk their happiness on chance of being asked a second time.

-Pride and Prejudice

If you take it into your head to go on refusing every offer ... (in this way), you will never get a husband at all-

-Pride and Prejudice

You should take it into further consideration that in spite of your manifold attractions, it is by no means certain that another offer may ever be made you.

-Pride and Prejudice

A man who has once been refused! How could I ever be so foolish enough to expect a renewal of his love? Is there one among the sex, who would not protest against such a weakness as a second proposal to the same woman? There is no dignity so abhorrent to their feelings!

-Pride and Prejudice

There is safety in reserve, but no attraction. One cannot love a reserved person. Not till the reserve ceases towards oneself, and then the attraction may be the greater.

-Emma

I am by no means assured of his regard for me. There are moments when the extent of it seems doubtful; till his sentiments are fully known, you cannot wonder at my wishing to avoid encouragement of my own partiality.

-Sense and Sensibility

Perhaps it will be wisest in you to check your feelings while you can; at any rate do not let them carry you far, unless you are persuaded of his liking you. Be observant of him. Let his behavior be the guide of your sensations.

-Emma

If a woman is partial to a man, and she does not endeavor to conceal it, he must find it out.

-Pride and Prejudice

If a woman conceals her affection ... from the object of it, she may lose the opportunity of fixing him ...

there are few of us who have heart enough to be in love without encouragement. In nine cases out of ten, a woman had better show more affection than she feels ... he may never do more than like her, if she does not help him on.

-Pride and Prejudice

If we do not venture, somebody else will.

-Pride and Prejudice

My being charming is not enough to induce me to marry. I must find other people charming—one other person at least, and I am only not going to be married, at present, but have very little intention of ever marrying at all ... I must see somebody very superior to any one I have seen yet.

-Emma

There may be a hundred ways of being in love.

-Emma

This sensation of listlessness, weariness, stupidity, this disinclination to sit and employ myself, this feeling of everything's being dull and insipid about the house!—I must be in love; I should be the oddest creature in the world if I were not.

-Emma

Where the heart is really attached, I know very well how little one can be pleased with the attention of any body else. Every thing is so insipid, so uninteresting, that does not relate to the beloved object.

-Northanger Abbey

Anything interests between those in love; and any thing will serve as introduction to what is near the heart.

-Emma

It is no laughing matter to have had you so mistaken as to your feelings.

-Letters

You are too sensible a girl ... to fall in love merely because you are warned against it.

-Pride and Prejudice

The greatest misfortune of all!—to find a man agreeable whom one is determined to hate.

-Pride and Prejudice

It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy;—it is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days more than enough for others.

-Sense and Sensibility

I am an advocate of early marriage, where there are means in proportion, and would have every young man, with sufficient income, settle as soon after twenty-four as he can.

-Mansfield Park

There is nothing I so abominate for young people as a long engagement ... I would rather have young people settle on a small income at once, and have to struggle with a few difficulties together, than be involved in a long engagement.

-Persuasion

How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparation?

-Emma

If they profess a disinclination for it, I only set it down that they have not yet seen the right person.

-Mansfield Park

What is right to be done cannot be done too soon.

-Emma

He lamented that young people would be in such a hurry to marry—and to marry strangers too.

-Emma

When two young people take it into their heads to marry they are pretty sure by perseverance to carry their point, be they ever so poor, or ever so imprudent, or ever so little likely to be necessary to each other's ultimate comfort.

-Persuasion

So young; known to so few, to be snatched off ... into a state of most wearing, anxious, youth-killing dependence!

-Persuasion

It would not be a desirable thing to have him engaged to a girl whom he had not the smallest acquaintance with, and who was so entirely without fortune.

-Northanger Abbey

One's happiness must in some measure be always at the mercy of chance.

-Sense and Sensibility

One's consequence, you know, varies so much at times without any particular reason.

-Letters

Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance ... It is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life!

-Pride and Prejudice

Perfect Felicity is not the property of Mortals, and no one had a right to expect uninterrupted Happiness.

-Letters

There is nothing people are so often deceived in as the state of their own feelings.

-Northanger Abbey

There is not one in a hundred of either sex, who is not taken in when they marry ... I feel that it must be so, when I consider that it is, of all transactions, the one in which people expect most from others, and are least honest themselves.

-Mansfield Park

Seldom, very seldom does complete truth belong to any human disclosure.

-Emma

I know so many who have married in the full expectation and confidence of some one particular advantage in the connection, or accomplishment or good quality in the person who have found themselves entirely deceived, and been obliged to put up with exactly the reverse.

-Mansfield Park

There is no denying destiny.

-Lady Susan

Chapter Two

Marrying Well

We must marry,—I could do very well single for my own part ... If I could be young forever, but my father cannot provide for us, and it is very bad to grow old and be poor.

-The Watsons

If nothing more advantageous occurred, it would be better for her to marry than to be single.

-Sense and Sensibility

Single women have a dreadful propensity for being poor, which is one very strong argument in favour of matrimony.

-Letters

Nothing is in question but the desire of well being.

-Pride and Prejudice

A large income is the best recipe for happiness.

-Mansfield Park

Money can only give happiness where there is nothing else to give it. Beyond a competence, it can afford no real satisfaction, as far as mere self is concerned.

-Sense and Sensibility

Without thinking highly of either men or matrimony, marriage had always been her object; it was the only honorable provision for well-educated young women of small fortune, and however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest preservation from want.

-Pride and Prejudice

There are not many in the rank of life who can afford to marry without some attention to money.

-Pride and Prejudice

Will you tell me how long you have loved him? ... It has been coming on so gradually, that I hardly know when it began. But I believe I must date it from my first seeing his beautiful grounds at Pemberly.

-Pride and Prejudice

I think I could like any good-humored man with a comfortable income.

-The Watsons

There certainly are not so many men of large fortune in the world, as there are pretty women who deserve them.

-Mansfield Park

Thought of their marriage had been raised, by his prospects of riches.

-Sense and Sensibility

He is rich, to be sure, and may have more fine carriages ... But will they make you happy?

-Pride and Prejudice

A very narrow income has a tendency to contract the mind, and sour the temper.

-Emma

There is something honourable and valuable in the strong domestic habits.

-Emma

Female economy will do a great deal ... but it cannot turn a small income into a large one.

-The Watsons

Where there is affection, young people are seldom withheld by immediate want of fortune, from entering into engagement with each other.

-Pride and Prejudice

It is contrary to every doctrine of hers that difference of fortune should keep any couple asunder who were attracted by resemblance of disposition.

-Sense and Sensibility

The miseries of a marriage with one, whose immediate connections were so unequal to his own.

-Pride and Prejudice

There would be difficulties in his way, if he were to wish to marry a woman who had not either a great fortune or high rank.

-Sense and Sensibility

The grief of seeing you unable to respect your partner in life.

-Pride and Prejudice

Your wife has a claim to your politeness, to your respect, at least.

-Sense and Sensibility

Matrimony, as the origin of change, was always disagreeable.

-Emma

People are never respected when they step out of their proper sphere.

-Mansfield Park

If you were sensible of your own good, you would not wish to quit the sphere in which you have been brought up.

-Pride and Prejudice

You will be censured, slighted, and despised by every one connected with him. Your alliance will be a disgrace; your name will never even be mentioned by any of us.

-Pride and Prejudice

To marry for money I think the wickedest thing in existence.

-Northanger Abbey

She was nobody when he married her, barely the daughter of a gentleman; but ever since her being turned into a Churchill she has out Churchill'd them all in high and mighty claims ... I assure you, she is an upstart ... I have quite a horror of upstarts.

-Emma

It would be a compact of convenience ... it would be no marriage at all, but that would be nothing. To me, it would seem only a commercial exchange, in which each wished to be benefited at the expense of the other.

-Sense and Sensibility

What is the difference in matrimonial affairs, between the mercenary and the prudent motive? Where does discretion end, and avarice begin?

-Pride and Prejudice

When one lives in the world, a man's or woman's marrying for money is too common to strike one as it ought.

-Persuasion

Where people are attached, poverty itself is wealth.

-Northanger Abbey

Everything nourishes what is strong already.

-Pride and Prejudice

Chapter Three

Setting One's Cap

Artlessness will never do in love matters.

-Lady Susan

We married women must begin to exert ourselves.

-Emma

The pains which they, their mothers (very clever women), as well as my dear aunt, and myself, have taken to reason, coax, or trick him into marrying, is inconceivable.

-Mansfield Park

Her behavior may arise only from vanity, or a wish of gaining the admiration of a man whom she must imagine to be particularly prejudiced against her ... she is poor, and may naturally seek an alliance which may be advantageous to herself.

-Lady Susan

Coming to town and putting herself to an expense in clothes, which impoverished her for two years.

-Lady Susan

There is always something offensive in the details of cunning. The maneuvers of selfishness and duplicity must ever be revolting.

-Persuasion

You are disgusted with the women who were always speaking and looking and thinking for your approbation alone.

-Pride and Prejudice

There is meanness in all the arts which ladies sometimes condescend to employ for captivation. Whatever bears affinity to cunning is despicable.

-Pride and Prejudice

I do not particularly like your way of getting husbands.

-Pride and Prejudice

I abhor every commonplace phrase by which wit is intended; and "setting one's cap at a man," or "making a conquest," are the most odious of all.

-Sense and Sensibility

The attempts of either of my daughters towards what you call catching him. It is not an employment to which they have been brought up.

-Sense and Sensibility

There is nothing she would not do to get married.

-The Watsons

Vanity working on a weak head produces every sort of mischief. Nothing so easy as for a young lady to raise her expectations too high.

-Emma

Aiming at a style of life which fortune could not warrant, seeking to better themselves by wealthy connection; a forward, bragging scheming race.

-Northanger Abbey

The danger of raising expectations which might only end in disappointment.

-Pride and Prejudice

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Jane Austen's Rules of Romance by Ticia Blackburn Copyright © 2012 by Patricia Blackburn. Excerpted by permission of AuthorHouse. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Contents

Introduction....................vi
A Most Suitable Connection....................8
Marrying Well....................32
Setting One's Cap....................44
Making the Match....................52
The Accomplished Woman....................70
The Eligible Gentleman....................90
Ungallant Behavior....................100
Solitary Elegance....................114

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