Java in a Nutshell / Edition 5

Java in a Nutshell / Edition 5

by David Flanagan
3.0 4
ISBN-10:
0596007736
ISBN-13:
2900596007736
Pub. Date:
03/28/2005
Publisher:
O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
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Java in a Nutshell 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
The_Bayonne_Reader More than 1 year ago
I bought the book; I'll use it when I need to reference specific classes of functionality. It's not like I'm using it everyday.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The subject of this book is presented in a direct, technical, no-nonsense manner. The information is very useful to those with a technical background - especially in programming. Those just starting out would probably be better served by approaching this subject at a lower level. For those with experience, everything is there (although, at times it does get a little dry).
Guest More than 1 year ago
Recently, Sun gave us a significant upgrade to Java - the release of Java 5. A slew of the inevitable bug fixes. But also key new features, as explained here by Flanagan in the 5th edition of his long running reference. Some new abilities lead to notational simplification, like autoboxing. So if k is an Integer, you can now say 'k=5' instead of the clumsier 'k=new Integer(5)'. With a similar inverse process if q is an int, of being able to write 'q=k' rather than 'q=k.intValue()'. Though of course the older forms are still valid, for backward compatibility. Hey, varargs are now allowed! Much to the pleasure of some of you who came from C programming and used this nice feature. Ever since Java came out, there has been a continual, albeit quiet, push for varargs. Finally! By now, experienced Java programmers may be familiar with earlier versions of the book. There may be mild astonishment at the sheer heft of this edition. Thanks to its popularity, Java has bulked up in the number and scope of its classes. The book is a reassuring sign of Java's vitality.