Jayber Crow

Jayber Crow

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Overview

Jayber Crow by Wendell Berry, Paul Michael

From the simple setting of his own barber shop, Jayber Crow, orphan, SEMInarian, and native of Port William, recalls his life and the life of his community as it spends itself in the middle of the twentieth century. Surrounded by his friends and neighbors, he is both participant and witness as the community attempts to transcend its own decline. And meanwhile Jayber learns the art of devotion and that a faithful love is its own reward.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781596444447
Publisher: christianaudio.com
Publication date: 05/28/2007
Edition description: Unabridged
Pages: 12
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 6.00(h) x 0.75(d)

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Jayber Crow 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
JFillingham More than 1 year ago
This is a slow paced, no frills, authentic book. Wendell berry has so much to say about the real life. Good stuff.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Beautifully written. This was a wonderful and insightful read.
Ed-Philosopher More than 1 year ago
Slow, contemplative fiction about what we've lost by destroying rural America. Berry is a prolific, wise and brilliant farmer-philosopher. Pick any of his books, savor each page, and prepare to be changed. It's time to get out of the fast lane.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The insights this author has from the view point of the town barber are absolutely the most significant I can remember. Slow paced and heart-warming, Jayber has a wisdom that is spiritual and reflective. Wendell Berry is an incredible author with a keen sense of dignity. A must!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book pulls you out of your own reality and into a slower, more peaceful life. Any person who feels rushed in life should definitely read this book. Berry's colorful description and awesome gift for storytelling make this book a necessity.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is wonderful. Mr. Berry does such a great job at drawing the reader in. I loved spending time with Jayber Crow. It is hands down one of the best books I have read. It's down to earth, and homey. Reading "Jayber Crow" is like listening to an old friend.
YoyoMitch More than 1 year ago
How to speak of a novel that: is well-written to the place of perfection, reads like a meditation on the spirituality of living as a loving being, is a piece of Historical Fiction of a time (1914 – 1985+/-) and place (the hills of Kentucky) where people mattered and was so engaging that finishing it is akin to saying goodbye to a close friend as one moves from home to an unknown location? How to describe a character like Jayber Crow – Everyman, Shaman, Wanderer, Explorer, Speaker-of-Truth – who defies being confined to such mundane monikers? One cannot contain the breadth and depth of such a book as this by using words, one must experience Jayber Crow as he lives his life in Port William, Kentucky. Jonah Crow was orphaned before his fourth birthday, raised by an aunt and uncle, who had wanted children but were never “so blest,” until he was, “. . . a little past ten years old and I was the survivor already of two stories completely ended.” (p.28). He was then placed in The Good Shepherd Orphanage where he became “J. Crow” by the motion of the superintendent’s will. Soon thereafter, “J.” was “Jaybird” then became “Jayber” about the time he considered that he “was called to preach.” As a result of this “call,” he was granted a scholarship to Pigeonville Bible College. While there, his true calling caught up to him – he not only had doubts, but found those questions to be the root of his (deeply held) faith. “You have been given questions to which you cannot be given answers. You will have to live them out – perhaps a little at the time.” “And how long is that going to take?” “I don’t know. As long as you live, perhaps.” “That could take a long time.” “I will tell you a further mystery,” he said. “It may take longer.” (p. 54) Upon leaving Pigeonville, he explores the “wider world” for a few years, by barbering in Lexington, Kentucky. In 1937, at the beginning of a historic flood, he “knew” he had to return to Port William. There, for the rest of his life (at least the amount he could chronicle) he watched, listened, learned to love and became a part of the community that gave him life as it taught him how to live it. He lived “into” some of the possible answers to the questions he had while at Pigeonville. There are so many points worthy of thoughtful reflection found in this book that it could easily be a meditation aid, regardless of one’s focus of faith or Spiritual basis. (“I felt the presence of memories I could not remember” p. 132; “I am as mystified as anybody by the transformation known as death, and the resurrection is more real to me than most things I have not yet seen.” p. 157; “I sat in my chair and let the cold, slow daylight come around me.” p. 243, etc.) What is not a moment of potential awakening in the book is a moment of visiting relatives in any small southern town in years gone by. Reading many of Jayber’s recollections took me back to so many places in of my youth, with such clarity, that I felt the winds of my childhood blowing around me. I am nearly ashamed that I have lived in Kentucky for most of my life, had heard of Wendell Berry frequently, but had managed to not read any of his work until a friend mentioned the impact this novel was having in her life. To not read the writing of such an author as Mr. Berry is to deny the power of reading, clear thinki
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OJoy More than 1 year ago
This is one of the most moving novels I've read in some time. I'm not quite sure how I have missed reading Wendell Berry. He has been writing essays, poetry and novels since the 1960's. This novel takes place in the town of Port William, one you would think actually exists, and it's main character of Jayber Crow. It is a leisurely but powerful story of the importance of community and land conservation. It is NOT an action packed modern novel, but one you will want to read again and again to see what you missed and reinforce what you loved.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wendell Berry's series about the imaginary rural community of Port William is spellbinding. Jayber Crow is one of the main characters in the series. I recommend all of the books in this series. Once you read one, you will be hooked.
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Stands there* -Lightfoot.