ISBN-10:
0131759698
ISBN-13:
9780131759695
Pub. Date:
09/01/1993
Publisher:
Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference
Jazz Styles: History and Analysis / Edition 5

Jazz Styles: History and Analysis / Edition 5

by Mark C. C. Gridley

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780131759695
Publisher: Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference
Publication date: 09/01/1993
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 442
Product dimensions: 8.05(w) x 10.09(h) x 1.37(d)

Table of Contents

CONTENTS

 

Preface  

Acknowledgements

 

1 INTRODUCTION

 

PART I   BASICS OF JAZZ

 

2 WHAT IS JAZZ?   

3 APPRECIATING JAZZ IMPROVISATION  

 

PART II PREMODERN JAZZ

 

4 ORIGINS OF JAZZ  

5 EARLY JAZZ: COMBO JAZZ PRIOR TO THE MIDDLE

6 SWING:  THE EARLY 1930s TO THE LATE 1940s 

7 DUKE ELLINGTON

8 THE COUNT BASIE BANDS  

 

PART III MODERN JAZZ:  THE EARLY 1940s to the EARLY 1960s

 

9 BOP:  THE EARLY 1940s to the EARLY 1950s

10 COOL JAZZ

11 HARD BOP   

12 MILES DAVIS, HIS GROUPS & SIDEMEN

13 JOHN COLTRANE   

 

PART IV MODERN JAZZ:  THE EARLY 1960s to the PRESENT

 

14 1960s and 1970s AVANT-GARDE and “FREE” JAZZ  

15 BILL EVANS, HERBIE HANCOCK, CHICK COREA, and KEITH JARRETT

16 JAZZ-ROCK FUSION  

17 1980 to the PRESENT

18 OTHER VOICES   

 

APPENDICES

 

Appendix A:   Brief Outline of Jazz Styles

Appendix B:   Elements of Music

Appendix C:   Strategies for Buying Recorded Music

Appendix D:   A Small Basic Collection of Jazz Videos   

Appendix E:   Glossary  

Appendix F:   Supplementary Reading

Appendix G:   Sources for Solo Transcriptions  

Appendix H:   For Musicians   

 

Index

 

 

Preface

The goal of the eighth edition of Jazz Styles was to give the reader a broader and more current picture of jazz while maintaining the same style and structure that has proven so effective in earlier editions. To reach this goal we have undertaken several significant additions to this edition, all of them came from the requests of students and professors familiar with earlier editions. The major additions are:

  1. A new chapter dealing with contemporary jazz
  2. A new concluding chapter
  3. New photos of Wynton Marsalis, John Zorn, Steve Turre, Joe Lovano, Bobby McFerrin, Cassandra Wilson, and Fats Waller

The contemporary jazz chapter (chapter 17) updates this text with a discussion of various jazz styles and performers from around 1980 to the present. With so many diverse approaches and phenomenal players coming to prominence in the last twenty years or so, it would be impossible to describe all developments and trends. This chapter presents some of the most important innovations, balancing musicians from different "camps." Though by no means comprehensive, this chapter should give students a firm foundation in many of the issues important to contemporary jazz while introducing some of the major players of the era.

The final chapter (chapter 18) poses several questions: What is jazz? (with some possible new conclusions to complement chapter 2); Why hasn't jazz become more popular?; What next?. While some possible solutions are suggested for each query, no definite conclusions are drawn. Instead, these questions are intended to serve as springboards for discussion and an opportunity for students to synthesize the material theyhave studied throughout the course of the text.

In fact, both new chapters pose several questions in addition to presenting a substantial amount of new information. For example, Chapter 17 briefly discusses the controversies that surround two prominent contemporary jazz musicians, as well as their contributions. It then asks what defines the jazz tradition-the way the music sounds, or the manner in which it is approached? This type of discussion has been present in just about every jazz circle from the earliest days of the music. The debate is not closed here, just propounded. Perhaps, in the jazz tradition, the asking of the question is more important than finding a conclusive answer.

Adding to an already outstanding text was an exciting, but daunting task. I'd like to thank many people for their contributions. First, I am ,grateful to Mark Gridley for writing such a comprehensive and significant text. Not only did he provide an exquisite backdrop for the contributions found here, but he composed a text that I have personally used and enjoyed in classes over the past several years.

Several people helped in the research, writing, and editing process of my contributions here. I am greatly indebted to those who freely shared their suggestions and comments about the writings with me: Joe DeFazio, Scott Garlock, Rob I-Hudson, Lee Heritage, John Wilson, Joe Rishel, Tom Blobner, Bryon Holly, and Jeremy Frantz. I'd also like to thank my colleagues at Duquesne University who have been so supportive in my taking on this project, especially Ed Kocher, David Stock, Jessica Wiskus, Lynn and Bill Purse, and Sister Carole Riley, as well as my colleagues, mentors, and friends Don Freund, Sven-David Sandstrom, Claude Baker, Fred Sturm, Amy Cutler, and In-Sil Yoo. Chris Johnson, from Prentice Hall, was incredibly helpful and friendly throughout this project. A special thanks goes to my mother, Dr. Tina Cantrell, who spent countless hours editing my writing. Most of all, I'd like to thank my students, who have made the research and teaching of jazz an incredibly gratifying experience.

David Cuttler
Duquesne University
June, 2002

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