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Jesus Died for This?: A Religious Satirist's Search for the Risen Christ
     

Jesus Died for This?: A Religious Satirist's Search for the Risen Christ

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by Becky Garrison
 

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From the author: When I arrived at Yale Divinity School back in 1988, I expected to engage in an intense period of discussion and self-reflection around issues like eschatology, evangelism, and ecclesiology with fellow Protestants of all stripes (with a few Catholics thrown in as sort of a guilty pleasure). After all, despite our theological differences, surely we all

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From the author: When I arrived at Yale Divinity School back in 1988, I expected to engage in an intense period of discussion and self-reflection around issues like eschatology, evangelism, and ecclesiology with fellow Protestants of all stripes (with a few Catholics thrown in as sort of a guilty pleasure). After all, despite our theological differences, surely we all at least bought into this Nicene Creed biz where it clearly states that Jesus was born, died, and then rose again from the dead? Silly me. Instead way, way, way too much time was spent navel gazing over trivial topics like Why can’t priests be promiscuous? What priestly perks come with this parish? Is YDS a Christian’ divinity school? (This Q comes courtesy of the fundy faithful) and my favorite Why don’t you use &hat;%$#@ inclusive language in worship? (Uh, Jesus was a “dude.” Hello.) I just don’t see why the creator of all, who loves all of her creation unconditionally, would bring his son into the world to suffer, die, and then rise from the dead unless he knew such an act was needed to transform the world. There’s no way God would have given us the gift of eternal life just so we could stage Christian catfights that make us all look like biblical buffoons. Yes, we can point the finger at silver tongued televangelists and politicians behaving unbiblically. But the more I cover Christian carnage, I realize that this foolish quest to conform Christ’s teachings to the whims of one’s own socio-political agenda has started to stink up the local churches big time. I know Jesus was born in a barn but do churches have to smell like one as well? In I Died for This? I will pick up my pitchfork and muck out the spiritual stables for signs of the living Christ hidden under the mounds of Jesus junk and faith fertilizer. My search will start when I first set foot in the Promised Land in January 2007 and conclude with the 2008 election a.k.a. the Presidential Promised Land. Along the way I will expose emergent excesses, debunk democratic dogma and other biblical bunk that separates us from the radical rule breaking, love making rabble rouser who came to save us all.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780310562689
Publisher:
Zondervan
Publication date:
08/10/2010
Sold by:
Zondervan Publishing
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
240
File size:
2 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Becky Garrison is a Contributing Editor for Sojourners. Her books include The New Atheist Crusaders and Their Unholy Grail, Rising from the Ashes: Rethinking Church, and Red and Blue God, Black and Blue Church. Her additional writing credits include work for The Wittenburg Door, Geez, Killing the Buddha, and Religion Dispatches, as well as various other odd and sundry publications.

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Jesus Died for This?: A Satirist's Search for the Risen Christ 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
mojo_turbo More than 1 year ago
Becky Garrison's latest book Jesus Died for This? Is a Satirist's look at that part of the world that claims to be Christ's followers. Chapter by chapter, Garrison takes her readers through several places in the world and some key events of her life, all the while narrating her journey through her witty and sometimes dark lens. Even though Garrison says she is the offspring of Karl and Nancy Garrison (a story Garrison tells you in chapter nine) her author's dialogue sounds more like what I would expect the daughter of Dennis Miller and Kathleen Madigan to sound like. And in case you don't know what a satirist is, Garrison will tell you on page 101, "We're the mavericks, the visionaries who buck hierarchy and prefer to work solo.we're also the ones who say what has to be said without giving a rip who we offend. Hence we often find ourselves standing alone in a field because no one wants to be near us for fear we might shoot their sacred cow." That said, this isn't reading for the average pew filler, or mascara wearing, bible belt, TBN supporter. Garrison is quick to fire her wit (and charm) at everything from the Holy Land to Christian conferences, to her own family, to comic con to Joel Olsteen and back again. My only criticism (and who am I to judge a published and respected writer, stop reading my review and buy her book) is that sometimes the chapters felt connected, as if she were taking me on a Bruce Feiler-esque journey and other times it felt as though I was reading entries out of her personal diary (and maybe those two are actually the same thing, I don't know). But each chapter entry does seem to ask that same question. Jesus died for this? He died for consumerism? For the emergent church? For the crystal cathedral's Christmas program? For Pastor conferences? For church smart alecks? For fundies? For the homeless and for the unordainable? Maybe to answer the question here is Garrison in her own words. "I realized along the way that I quit trying to find Jesus and simply let him do the talking, every so often I felt God's presence when walking on soil, or I saw God's face in other souls. Other times, I'd feel nothing. But that usually meant I either looked in the wrong place or didn't sit still long enough for God to enter the picture. Now, even when I feel all alone, I no longer think that God has abandoned me. (After all, who do I think I am? - Mother Theresa?)" I liked the book, it's certainly not something I have read before or a book I could compare with others in my pastoral library.