Johann Baptist Vanhal: Four String Quartets

Johann Baptist Vanhal: Four String Quartets

by Lotus String Quartet

CD

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Product Details

Release Date: 11/11/2014
Label: Cpo Records
UPC: 0761203747528
catalogNumber: 7774752
Rank: 156139

Tracks

  1. String Quartet in C minor, Op. 1/4 (Weinmann 5a:c2)
  2. String Quartet in G major (Weinmann 5a:G8)
  3. String Quartet in A major, Op. 33/2 (Weinmann 5a:A4)
  4. String Quartet in E flat major (Weinmann 5a:Es11)

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Johann Baptist Vanhal: Four String Quartets 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
RGraves321 More than 1 year ago
Czech composer Johann Baptist Vanhal (1739-1813) was born just seven years after Franz Joseph Haydn, and died four years after him. Vanhal's music parallels Haydn's in style as well -- especially in his earlier works. The Lotus String Quartet has selected four outstanding examples from Vanhal's catalog of over 100 chamber pieces. The String Quartet in C minor, Op. 1, No. 4 (1769) was written while Vanhal was touring Italy, to learn the Italianate style. In this quartet, the lyrical melodies are paramount, with the other voices consigned to a supporting role. String Quartet in G major (1780) was written after he returned to Vienna. In this work, motivic development comes to the fore, as it does in contemporary quartets by Haydn and Mozart. The String Quartet in A major, Op. 33, No. 2 (1785) and the String Quartet in E-flat major (1786) represent Vanhal's final thoughts on the genre. While "Sturm und Drang" contrasts are evident, Vanhal takes a different -- and somewhat more mannered -- approach than Haydn. The quartet in E-flat is especially delightful, an entertaining work by a composer in full command of his resources. The Lotus String Quartet seems to have an affinity for this repertoire. They play expressively, but also with a little bit of reserve that's the core of the classical period aesthetic.