ISBN-10:
0674475372
ISBN-13:
9780674475373
Pub. Date:
04/30/1999
Publisher:
Harvard
John Eliot's Mission to the Indians before King Philip's War

John Eliot's Mission to the Indians before King Philip's War

by Richard W. Cogley
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Overview

No previous work on John Eliot's mission to the Indians has told such a comprehensive and engaging story. Richard Cogley takes a dual approach: he delves deeply into Eliot's theological writings and describes the historical development of Eliot's missionary work. By relating the two, he presents fresh perspectives that challenge widely accepted assessments of the Puritan mission.

Cogley incorporates Eliot's eschatology into the history of the mission, takes into account the biographies of the proselytes (the "praying Indians") and the individual histories of the Christian Indian settlements (the "praying towns"), and corrects misperceptions about the mission's role in English expansion. He also addresses other interpretive problems in Eliot's mission, such as why the Puritans postponed their evangelizing mission until 1646, why Indians accepted or rejected the mission, and whether the mission played a role in causing King Philip's War.

This book makes signal contributions to New England history, Native American history, and religious studies.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780674475373
Publisher: Harvard
Publication date: 04/30/1999
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 352
Product dimensions: 6.12(w) x 9.25(h) x (d)

About the Author

Richard W. Cogley is Associate Professor of Religious Studies, Southern Methodist University.

Table of Contents

The Context of the Mission

The Submission of the Sachems and the Birth of the Mission

The Early Development of the Mission

The Mission and the Millennium

The Natick Mission

The Remaining Praying Towns

Missionary Work outside Massachusetts Bay

The Supervision of the Mission

Conclusion: The Apostle and the Indians

Appendixes

John Cotton's Lectures on Revelation and Canticles

Variant Indian Personal and Place Names in the Missionary History of Massachusetts Bay

Population Figures and Permanent and Temporary Personnel in the Prewar Settlements

Principal Nonantum and Petonset Indians

Eliot's Massachusett Publications

Abbreviations

Principal Printed Sources

Notes

Index

What People are Saying About This

Smartly and provocatively, this book contests prevailing views of Puritan missionizing, and I predict that it will cause a major stir among historians of Puritanism, colonial New England, early American religion, and Eastern Woodlands Native Peoples. It presents a more complete and textured view of Eliot's work than we have previously possessed. No one before has grasped Eliot's project in its entirety. Moreover, no one has delved so carefully into Eliot's theology of mission...This book is important for the dialogue it will generate; scholars will have to re-evaluate the revisionist position very carefully.

Charles L. Cohen

Smartly and provocatively, this book contests prevailing views of Puritan missionizing, and I predict that it will cause a major stir among historians of Puritanism, colonial New England, early American religion, and Eastern Woodlands Native Peoples. It presents a more complete and textured view of Eliot's work than we have previously possessed. No one before has grasped Eliot's project in its entirety. Moreover, no one has delved so carefully into Eliot's theology of mission...This book is important for the dialogue it will generate; scholars will have to re-evaluate the revisionist position very carefully.
Charles L. Cohen, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Alden Vaughan

Cogley truly understands the seventeenth century's theological literature...[He] also understands the Puritan ministry--how it worked and how it expressed itself. His thorough grounding in Puritan religious thought, and the fact that he doesn't himself subscribe to Puritan ideology or have any stake in glorifying New England history, make Cogley the ideal scholar to explicate fairly the missionary program. And because Cogley is familiar with the full range of primary and secondary literature on the missionaries and on their Indian proselytes, he is able to give a perceptive, thorough, and persuasive portrait of the Puritan program. I consider Cogley's book the most original and important contribution to Puritan missionary studies that we've ever had and a very important addition to the larger and equally lively field of New England Puritan studies.

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