John Keats, Selected Poems

John Keats, Selected Poems

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$9.95

Overview

As John Barnard shows in this new selection, Keat's poetry is often indirectly critical of conventional political, religious and sexual beliefs. While Keats sought to embody in his work the 'dreams of art', he was as John Barnard comments, also aware of the limitations of the claims of poetry and the imagination and remained deeply conscious of human suffering.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780140585988
Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date: 08/01/1989
Series: Poetry Library
Pages: 256
Product dimensions: 5.30(w) x 7.78(h) x 0.64(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction ix
Note on the Text xvii
Chronology xix
Lines Written on 29 May The Anniversary of the Restoration of Charles II
1(1)
On First Looking into Chapman's Homer
1(1)
To my Brothers
2(1)
Addressed to [Haydon]
2(1)
'I stood tip-toe upon a little hill'
3(7)
Sleep and Poetry
10(12)
Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition
22(1)
To Kosciusko
22(1)
'After dark vapours have oppressed our plains'
23(1)
To Leigh Hunt, Esq.
23(1)
On the Sea
24(1)
'The Gothic looks solemn'
25(1)
Endymion: A Poetic Romance
26(61)
Preface
26(1)
Book I
27(28)
Book II (extracts)
55(12)
Book III (extracts)
67(12)
Book IV (extracts)
79(8)
Nebuchadnezzar's Dream
87(1)
To Mrs Reynolds's Cat
88(1)
On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again
88(1)
'When I have fears that I may cease to be'
89(1)
To---('Time's sea hath been five years at its slow ebb')
89(1)
'O thou whose face hath felt the Winter's wind'
90(1)
To J. H. Reynolds, Esq.
91(3)
Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil
94(17)
On Visiting the Tomb of Burns
111(1)
A Song about Myself
112(3)
From Fragment of the 'Castle Builder'
115(1)
'And what is love? It is a doll dressed up'
116(1)
Hyperion. A Fragment
117(25)
The Eve of St Agnes
142(12)
The Eve of St Mark
154(4)
'Why did I laugh tonight?...'
158(1)
Character of Charles Brown
159(1)
A Dream, after reading Dante's Episode of Paolo and Francesca
160(1)
La Belle Dame sans Merci. A Ballad
160(2)
To Sleep
162(1)
'If by dull rhymes our English must be chained'
163(1)
Ode to Psyche
163(2)
On Fame (I)
165(1)
On Fame (II)
166(1)
'Two or three posies'
166(1)
Ode on a Grecian Urn
167(2)
Ode to a Nightingale
169(3)
Ode on Melancholy
172(1)
Ode on Indolence
173(2)
Lamia
175(20)
Part I
175(11)
Part II
186(9)
'Bright star! would I were steadfast as thou art'
195(1)
'Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes'
196(1)
To Autumn
197(1)
The Fall of Hyperion. A Dream
198(15)
Canto I
198(13)
Canto II
211(2)
'What can I do to drive away'
213(2)
'This living hand, now warm and capable'
215(1)
'In after-time, a sage of mickle lore'
215(1)
Notes 216(16)
Index of First Lines 232

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