Joy in the Morning

Joy in the Morning

by P. G. Wodehouse
4.3 9

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Joy in the Morning 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great comedy!!! Wonderful book. Enjoyable!!!
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kath8899 More than 1 year ago
You just can't go wrong with anything from PG Wodehouse!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Joy in the Morning is one of those marvelous country comedies satirizing the English gentry that P.G. Wodehouse excelled at. The satire takes the familiar path of the nobility having more money and breeding than brains, while the ordinary folk are plagued by their nonsense. Wodehouse once noted that you could either do fiction starting from real life or start from the perspective of musical comedy. He chose the latter approach. Woolly-headed Bertram (Bertie) Wooster finds himself inevitably drawn into the lair he most fears, the country home of his demanding Aunt Agatha in Steeple Bumpleigh. He is ambivalent about Aunt Agatha, both fearing her, and relying on her for substantial funds. Unfortunately for him, his gentleman's gentleman, Jeeves, is the cause of the entrapment in Steeple Bumpleigh this time. So there is no escape, because Bertie would never be able to outmaneuver Jeeves. The cause of the geographic diversion on this occasion is that Jeeves would like to do a spot of fishing there, and you know how it is when Jeeves wants something. On the surface it looks like Uncle Percy merely needs a favor, but Jeeves is obviously working both sides of the street for his own benefit. Bertie has never had any good fortune in Steeple Bumpleigh. His Aunt Agatha has always been stern and strongly disapproving of him, while being very overbearing in her demands. Recently, she has remarried to Perceival, Lord Worplesdon, who once chased Bertie for a mile successfully brandishing a riding crop on Bertie's backside as a result of a youthful misunderstanding. Percy's son, Edwin, is worse than any juvenile delinquent you can imagine, because he operates under the cover of a do-gooding Boy Scout in creating his mayhem. Uncle Percy's daughter, Florence Craye, had once been engaged to Bertie, and he had barely avoided her unwanted grasp. No wonder Bertie avoids Steeple Bumpleigh like the River Styx. The potential horrors of Steeple Bumpleigh for Bertie are fortunately reduced in this story by the absence of Aunt Agatha and her son, Thos., who is suffering from the mumps. But Aunt Agatha imposes on Bertie in her absence to bring down a gift for her step-daughter, Florence Craye, and thus the complications begin. Before long, Bertie is at loggerheads with the usual suspects and at risk of wedding bells. In the meantime he does his best to secure wedding bells for the right couples, avoid them himself, and help out Aunt Agatha and Uncle Percy. And that's a big order, indeed, this time in Steeple Bumpleigh because matters become quite messy. Bertie usually makes his own trouble, but Jeeves, Edwin, and his old pal, Boko Fiddleworth, provide it in spades in this engaging story. Bertie soon feels like he has the proverbial tyre tracks on his body from being run over by misfortune at their hands. But after having satisfied his fishing yen, Jeeves saves the day with a brilliant and audacious improvisation, as he often does in these hilarious stories. I found the plot line to be even more charming and fun than the usual Bertie and Jeeves tale in this story. Bertie's character works better as an innocent dupe (his role in Joy in the Morning) th