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Overview

The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer, Ikki Matsumoto, Ginnie Hofmann, Marion Rombauer Becker

After the publication of her best-selling book To Begin Again, Naomi Levy received a flood of feedback from readers telling her how much the prayers in it had helped and moved them. Many urged her to publish a collection of her prayers--and now she has.

In a time when we all need inspiration, comfort, and connection, Talking to God will help us reclaim prayer as an integral part of our lives, making it as natural and uninhibited as talking to our loved ones. Prayer is essential to the lives of millions, but many of us are searching for ways to supplement traditional prayers with ones that are less formal and more intimate.

Written in a simple and direct style, the prayers in this book--and the wonderful stories that accompany them--are for people of all faiths, and for all occasions large and small. Naomi Levy's personal prayers address the anxieties and roadblocks we all face in contemporary life. There are prayers for facing a new day, realizing one's potential at work, celebrating an anniversary or birthday, and going to sleep at night. And there are prayers for the more profound occurrences in life--love and marriage, pregnancy and childbirth, illness, loss, and death.

Rabbi Levy's words, imbued with grace and empathy, touch on the entire range of human experience. Many of us will recognize ourselves in her prayers and stories and will be comforted by them, as well as challenged and uplifted. Perhaps most important, they are stepping-stones for us to go on and create our own prayers, to find meaning in our own lives, and to begin or renew our own relationships with God.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780452279155
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 11/28/1997
Edition description: REV
Pages: 928
Product dimensions: 6.80(w) x 9.08(h) x 1.31(d)

About the Author

Irma Rombauer self-published the first Joy of Cooking in 1931 with the small insurance payout she received after her husband committed suicide during the Great Depression. Suddenly, society wives who used to enjoy a kitchen staff no longer had the money to employ them and began cooking for themselves. The instruction "stand facing the stove" was a bit more pragmatic than we realize. In 1936, the first commercial edition was published by Bobbs-Merrill. Marion Rombauer Becker, Irma's daughter, joined the Joy dynasty and revised and updated each subsequent edition until 1975. That edition was the first after Irma's death and was completely Marion's. Her son, Ethan Becker, has returned the book to the family's voice, revising the 1975 edition for the 75th Anniversary Edition.

Irma Rombauer self-published the first Joy of Cooking in 1931 with the small insurance payout she received after her husband committed suicide during the Great Depression. Suddenly, society wives who used to enjoy a kitchen staff no longer had the money to employ them and began cooking for themselves. The instruction "stand facing the stove" was a bit more pragmatic than we realize. In 1936, the first commercial edition was published by Bobbs-Merrill. Marion Rombauer Becker, Irma's daughter, joined the Joy dynasty and revised and updated each subsequent edition until 1975. That edition was the first after Irma's death and was completely Marion's. Her son, Ethan Becker, has returned the book to the family's voice, revising the 1975 edition for the 75th Anniversary Edition.

Read an Excerpt

This recipe can be found in Joy Of Cooking's Stuffing chapter.

BASIC BREAD STUFFING
8 to 10 cups

This and the bread stuffing recipes that follow yield enough to stuff a 14- to 17-pound turkey. Many of the variations yield enough for an additional small casserole of stuffing. To stuff an oven roaster or 6 to 8 rock Cornish hens, halve the recipes. For a larger turkey, increase all the ingredients by half. The optional egg makes the stuffing firm. If you prefer the bread to be moist, skip the toasting step.

Position a rack in the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Toast until golden brown:

1 pound sliced firm white sandwich, French, or Italian bread, including crusts, cut into 1/2-inch cubes, or 10 cups lightly packed bread cubes

Turn into a large bowl. Heat in a large skillet over medium-high heat until the foam subsides:

4 to 8 tablespoons (1/2 to 1 stick) unsalted butter

Add and cook, stirring, until tender, about 5 minutes:

2 cups chopped onions 1 cup finely chopped celery

Remove from the heat and stir in:

1/4 to 1/2 cup minced fresh parsley
1 teaspoon dried sage, or 1 tablespoon minced fresh
1 teaspoon dried thyme, or 1 tablespoon minced fresh
I teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated or ground nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
Stir into the bread cubes and toss until well combined. Depending on how much butter you started with and how firm you want the stuffing, stir in, a little at a time, until the stuffing is lightly moist but not packed together:
1/3 to 1 cup chicken stock 1 to 2 large eggs, well beaten (optional)

Adjust the seasonings. To use as a stuffing, reheat just before spooning it into the bird(s). Or moisten with additional:

Stock and/or egg
and turn into a large, shallow buttered baking dish. Bake in a 350°F oven until the top has formed a crust and the stuffing is heated through, 25 to 40 minutes.

This information can be found in the Joy Of Cooking's Poultry chapter.

RULES FOR STUFFING BIRDS

1. Always stuff the bird just before roasting2. Have the stuffing hot and pack it loosely in the body and neck cavities. The stuffing must reach a temperature of 160°F during roasting to ensure that any possible pathogens are killed. If it is cold and packed tightly into the bird, it will not heat to this point until long after the bird is cooked through.

3. You must close the cavities in order to keep the stuffing in place. The quickest and most efficient way to do this is by sewingthe cavities shut with a trussing needle and twine. If you do not own a trussing needle, secure the body cavity with small skewers and lacing (kits for this purpose are sold at kitchen shops) and close the neck cavity with toothpicks.

4. When the bird has cooked through, take the temperature of the stuffing by plunging the stem of the thermometer deep into the body cavity. If the stuffing has not yet reached 160°F, simply take the bird out of the oven, scoop the stuffing into a buttered casserole, and bake it in the hot oven while the bird stands before carving.

5. Finally, always take all the stuffing out of the cooked bird as soon as you begin to carve. Stuffing left inside a large turkey may remain warm for several hours, even if the bird is refrigerated, providing a perfect environment for bacterial growth.

Copyright © 1997 by Simon & Schuster Inc., The Joy of CookingTrust and the MRB Revocable Trust

Table of Contents

Diet, Lifestyle & Health ..... 1
Entertaining ..... 8
Menus ..... 17
Coffee, Tea & Hot Chocolate ..... 24
Stocks & Sauces ..... 35
Condiments, Marinades & Dry Rubs ..... 60
Soups ..... 91
Eggs ..... 121
Hors D'oeuvre ..... 143
Little Dishes ..... 158
Sandwiches, Burritos & Pizzas ..... 181
Salads ..... 200
Salad Dressings ..... 234
Grains ..... 243
Beans & Tofu ..... 270
Pasta, Dumplings & Noodles ..... 295
Vegetables ..... 332
Fruits ..... 439
Stuffing ..... 481
Shellfish ..... 488
Fish ..... 527
Poultry ..... 567
Game ..... 625
Meat ..... 637
Yeast Breads ..... 735
Quick Breads ..... 771
Pancakes, Waffles, French Toast & Doughnuts ..... 793
Cookies ..... 812
Candy ..... 845
Pies & Tarts ..... 856
American Fruit Desserts ..... 894
Puff Pastry, Strudel & Danish Pastries ..... 906
Cakes, Tortes & Cupcakes ..... 923
Frostings, Fillings & Glazes ..... 987
Custards, Puddings, Mousses & Dessert Souffles ..... 1013
Dessert Sauces ..... 1040
Cooking Methods ..... 1050
Know Your Ingredients ..... 1058
Index ..... 1088

Interviews

On November 24, 1997, Ethan Becker joined barnesandnoble.com on AOL to discuss the revised, all-purpose Joy of Cooking. Along with a team of internationally praised chefs, Becker updated this American classic for the '90s, adding timesaving tips and diverse new recipes.



VogelBN: Hello, and welcome, Mr. Becker! We are pleased to have you tonight!

Irma S Rombauer: Good evening! Great to be here!


VogelBN: The audience is brimming with questions, so if you're ready, we'll dive right into them.

Irma S Rombauer: Sounds good!


Question: Most kids aren't allowed to hold a knife until they're 13, but I bet you were integrated into the kitchen pretty quickly. What is your first kitchen memory?

Irma S Rombauer: When mother was baking cookies and I got to lick the spoon.


Question: What motivated you to remove the "Canning and Preserves" chapter from Joy?

Irma S Rombauer: Space. We either had to enlarge it or drop it, and we felt the pasta and vegetable chapters were more necessary.


Question: A friend recently gave me an automatic bread maker as a shower gift. What does it do, and is the bread still as good?

Irma S Rombauer: The automatic bread maker is not as good as breads made by hand, but waking up to the smell of fresh bread is worth the price of admission. We use it for fresh cinnamon raisin toast — mmmmmmm!


Question: I am intrigued by the design of the recipes in Joy of Cooking. Who decided to list the ingredients throughout the recipe as opposed to all at the beginning? And why?

Irma S Rombauer: This format was invented by my grandmother as a space saver, and I think it is the most logical and easiest-to-use method.


Question: At the end of the introduction, I noticed a section crediting "Testers." That must be the best job in the world! How can I become a tester for the next edition?

Irma S Rombauer: It is harder work than you might think. But just to let you know,testers are chosen through friends who vouch for their taste buds. And actually, in this day and time, with the food world so expanded, there are many professionals who do just that for a living.


Question: Please help me make a good chicken-fried steak! Every time I try, the coating either falls off or gets greasy and oil-saturated. How hot should the oil be, what type, and what should the breading be made of, and how long should it fry? Thanks!

Irma S Rombauer: The oil should be very hot. The breading should be made using the batter you'll find in the new Joy for Chicken Fried Steak, page 663. Fry two to three minutes each side. Turn only once.


Question: I use your pecan pie recipe every Thanksgiving, but I had to adjust it a little because the crust kept burning. What can I do to prevent this?

Irma S Rombauer: Try checking the temperature of oven. You can find a hanging thermometer at most housewares departments. Inaccurate oven temperatures are a chronic problem.


Question: I love the new chapter "Little Dishes." I recently made samosas for a cocktail party; they were very successful. What inspired you to devote a chapter to meze, tapas, and the like?

Irma S Rombauer: They can be a creative core for a fun meal or party!


Question: I'm 86 and I've had a copy of Joy since I was married. I'm worried that the new version won't have my favorite recipes, like Beef Wellington or Tuna, Noodle and Mushroom Soup Casserole. What should I expect?

Irma S Rombauer: Beef Wellington is still there, but you will find most canned soups removed from recipes. But that doesn't mean you can't use them if you prefer.


Question: With one of the biggest culinary holidays approaching, I would like to know what Thanksgiving was like for the Rombauer-Becker family. Thanks!

Irma S Rombauer: That's a big question! It could take all night, but by and large, it was very similar most years to Thanksgiving dinners in homes across the country. The big difference was probably in dessert, as we generally had hazelnut torte instead of pumpkin pie.


Question: I tried making the cheese sauce for your cheese french toast and the top of the sauce was oily and runny, and the bottom was thick and not too appetizing. How can I improve?

Irma S Rombauer: What kind of cheese did you use? It sounds to me as if you're using too much heat when making the sauce. Try reducing the heat when cooking the sauce and increase the heat when you cook the toast.


Question: Is the main idea of the new edition to bring the cookbook up-to-date nutritionally or to take advantage of the many new ingredients now available year-round?

Irma S Rombauer: Definitely both. The new JOY was needed for a number of reasons. Recent developments in nutrition and new ingredients were two of the major reasons for the revision. One of the other big reasons was America's new lovefor big flavors. Yay!


Question: I have a question about sifting flour. I follow the Joy pancake recipe every Sunday morning. When I sift the flour and remeasure, I always end up putting back a significant amount of "overflow." Has the presift idea been eliminated?

Irma S Rombauer: Yes, we have eliminated the need to sift in the basic pancake recipe.


Question: Your cousins Brian and Charlotte Furness of Washington, D.C., wish you success with the new Joy and would appreciate more on how your mother and grandmother inspired you to continue the Rombauer-Becker tradition.

Irma S Rombauer: Hi, Brian and Charlotte! Carrying on the tradition seemed like the logical thing to do. Besides...who else?


Question: Is it okay to freeze the mince pie (your recipe) and cook it a few days later?

Irma S Rombauer: I would recommend refrigerating rather than freezing — but only or a few days.


Question: Do you hope your son will help out with the next edition?

Irma S Rombauer: A parent always has hopes, but he is young and still has many other things to do first.


Question: You worked with numerous internationally renowned chefs on the new edition. Your friend Stephen Schmidt contributed to five sections. He must be a very good friend. Could you comment on his involvement?

Irma S Rombauer: Stephen was invaluable. He has earned the nickname "Fix-it" for a very good reason. His experiences as a cooking instructor in classes all over America keep him very in-touch with what is being cooked, as well as what people want to cook.


Question: What is the biggest difference between the new Joy and old Joy?

Irma S Rombauer: You'll find the major emphasis is on freshness and flavor. The new veggie chapter is over 100 pages long; there is a chapter for pasta, a chapter on beans and grains.... The biggest difference is that it is written for today rather than 20 years ago.


VogelBN: Thank you so much for joining us tonight, Mr. Becker.

Irma S Rombauer: It has been a pleasure. And to all who joined us, I wish you Happy Thanksgiving and lots of joyful cooking!


Recipe

This recipe can be found in Joy Of Cooking's Stuffing chapter.

BASIC BREAD STUFFING
8 to 10 cups

This and the bread stuffing recipes that follow yield enough to stuff a 14- to 17-pound turkey. Many of the variations yield enough for an additional small casserole of stuffing. To stuff an oven roaster or 6 to 8 rock Cornish hens, halve the recipes. For a larger turkey, increase all the ingredients by half. The optional egg makes the stuffing firm. If you prefer the bread to be moist, skip the toasting step.

Position a rack in the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Toast until golden brown:

1 pound sliced firm white sandwich, French, or Italian bread, including crusts, cut into 1/2-inch cubes, or 10 cups lightly packed bread cubes

Turn into a large bowl. Heat in a large skillet over medium-high heat until the foam subsides:

4 to 8 tablespoons (1/2 to 1 stick) unsalted butter

Add and cook, stirring, until tender, about 5 minutes:

2 cups chopped onions 1 cup finely chopped celery

Remove from the heat and stir in:

1/4 to 1/2 cup minced fresh parsley
1 teaspoon dried sage, or 1 tablespoon minced fresh
1 teaspoon dried thyme, or 1 tablespoon minced fresh
I teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated or ground nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
Stir into the bread cubes and toss until well combined. Depending on how much butter you started with and how firm you want the stuffing, stir in, a little at a time, until the stuffing is lightly moist but not packed together:
1/3 to 1 cup chicken stock 1 to 2 large eggs, well beaten (optional)

Adjust the seasonings. To use as a stuffing, reheat just before spooning it into the bird(s). Or moisten with additional:

Stock and/or egg
and turn into a large, shallow buttered baking dish. Bake in a 350°F oven until the top has formed a crust and the stuffing is heated through, 25 to 40 minutes.

This information can be found in the Joy Of Cooking's Poultry chapter.

RULES FOR STUFFING BIRDS

1. Always stuff the bird just before roasting‹never ahead of time, which would give any harmful bacteria that might be present in the cavity ample time to breed.

2. Have the stuffing hot and pack it loosely in the body and neck cavities. The stuffing must reach a temperature of 160°F during roasting to ensure that any possible pathogens are killed. If it is cold and packed tightly into the bird, it will not heat to this point until long after the bird is cooked through.

3. You must close the cavities in order to keep the stuffing in place. The quickest and most efficient way to do this is by sewingthe cavities shut with a trussing needle and twine. If you do not own a trussing needle, secure the body cavity with small skewers and lacing (kits for this purpose are sold at kitchen shops) and close the neck cavity with toothpicks.

4. When the bird has cooked through, take the temperature of the stuffing by plunging the stem of the thermometer deep into the body cavity. If the stuffing has not yet reached 160°F, simply take the bird out of the oven, scoop the stuffing into a buttered casserole, and bake it in the hot oven while the bird stands before carving.

5. Finally, always take all the stuffing out of the cooked bird as soon as you begin to carve. Stuffing left inside a large turkey may remain warm for several hours, even if the bird is refrigerated, providing a perfect environment for bacterial growth.

Copyright © 1997 by Simon & Schuster Inc., The Joy of CookingTrust and the MRB Revocable Trust

Customer Reviews

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Joy of Cooking 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
dll More than 1 year ago
There is a new version of TJoC which I do not like as much as this original one. I have used this book for longer than my 26 years of marriage, and intend to make sure that each of my children have a copy when they establish their own households. The book not only gives well written recipes in many varieties for thousands of recipes - both those one would use in every day cooking, for holiday or festive occasions, large- and small-scale entertaining - but also contains a great deal of information about: preparing and preserving foods (including how to smoke meats); preparing and cooking wild game and organ meats which are not generally found in American supermarkets; clearly explained rules about table-setting and food display; and many more subjects that would take too much time for me to detail. My children and I use it for recipes which range from those for simple pancake or biscuits to more complex gingerbread houses, trifles, etc. Every time I want to make a perfectly pink roast or a turkey dinner, I open TJoC as soon as I bring home the meat so that even my time planning and defrosting will work out perfectly. WARNING: MAKE SURE TO BUY THE HARD COVER VERSION AND EXPECT TO HAVE TO REPLACE IT EVERY 10-15 YEARS FROM HEAVY USAGE!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have always relied on my Joy of Cooking for the fundamentals. This new edition is sorely lacking the basics, now it has become just another mediocre cook book. The old version had all the basics and was easy to read, the print in this new one is very difficult to follow. My suggestion is scour the used book stores for an older version. My newer version, well, it went back to the store it came from. This is definitely on the 'not Recomended' list until they get back to the basics.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One of the best cookbooks I have ever used for its ability to reference how to do the simplest things that even many experienced cooks do not know how to do -- how many minutes to broil, bake or steam. Good for vegetarians and meat-eaters alike.
JoyfulCook More than 1 year ago
I've collected the last three editions of the Joy of Cooking and look in one of them at least every other week. I just purchased a copy of the latest edition as a wedding present for a young bride who likes to cook but has done very little of it. I recommend to everyone who "thinks" they might like to start cooking, or start cooking more, that they read "Joy" like a novel. Cooking from it will make a serious improvement in the quality of life. If nothing else, it is an invaluable reference. Frequently I need to know "how long and at what temperature must I roast/simmer/fry" a certain meat/fish/vegetable. It has truly been a joy in my life for nearly 50 years.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's a shame they went and ruined the 1975 (seventh) edition! I wish it was still in print, I'd like some to give to young relatives. The new edition is just another cookbook.
rbacapemay More than 1 year ago
This has been my go to cook book for basics for almost 50 years (the 1975 edition). I own more than 300 cookbooks and love them all, but this is the the most used in the collection. This purchase was for a gift for my daughter recently called me for a specific recipe from it and I was surprised that she did not have a copy; she, too, loves cookbooks and has many. I was embarrassed that I had not given her one so here comes Christmas.
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nanomom More than 1 year ago
I received my cookbook the Joy of Cooking in 1980 from my best friend as a shower gift. I have used this book constantly over the years as a bible of cooking. While there are no fancy pictures like the cookbooks of today it does give detailed information how to on everything basic/mediocre and more advanced cooks need. My daughter is getting married this June and when my mom asked me what do I get her I immediately said The Joy of Cooking cookbook (the 1975 addition). You may have other cookbooks on your shelf but this is a "must" have.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm 51 years old and have never lived without this cookbook. My mother was very attached to hers and as soon as I left home I obtained my own copy. I'm not so dependent on the recipes as I am on the information it supplies on the "whys" and "hows" for cooking. It's also invaluable for its info on substitutions. I don't consider it the best cookbook for a casual cook, but I've never found one better for a serious cook/baker. Using info in this book I've created desserts so consistently good that I've had restaurant owners beg me to provides desserts for them! I recently loaned out my old copy and it never came back - that's the only reason I'm buying one now.
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GoodBooksAbound More than 1 year ago
This is the cornerstone of my cookbook collection simply because it has all the great tricks, the basic ingredients, and techniques necessary to make any cook a great cook. When other cookbooks muddle a recipe with complexity, I can always go to Joy to get the inside scoop on what really should have been written. It is also written in a manner that is easily understood even by my friends that are not native english speakers. BEWARE: The 1975 edition is the best. The new edition (8th edition,usually touted as the 2006 edition) is horrid compared to it. The lettering is difficult to read, it introduces bad shortcuts and many of the basics that make good sound cooking have been edited out. They were clearly unduely influenced by those who should be making reservations for dinner. I am hoping they will come to their senses and write an edition that is more in-depth as it pertains to the ingredients and techniques. I have read mine from cover to cover several times so it is a bit tattered and needs to be replaced (as is the norm every 10 years or so).
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Guest More than 1 year ago
The Joy Of Cooking was my very first cookbook given to me by a dear aunt for Christmas in 1965. It's been my favorite & old faithful throughout the years. I bought my daughter & niece a copy too. It definitely is a 'Must Have' cookbook for the kitchen!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This cookbook is my favorite of my collection. I received it as a wedding gift from my aunt. Its nice because instead of a card she wrote a nice note inside the front cover. I have done the same for wedding gifts since. In fact I am here now to do that very thing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is truly a wonderful cookbook. I immediately go to the Joy of Cooking cookbook whenever I want to prepare something special or just an every day meal. I know what I prepare will always turn out perfect because of the recipes and instructions contained in the book. All of the background information in the book is well worth reading before proceeding with any recipe. I've prepared many of the dishes listed in the book and have never been disappointed in any of them. I've used my bread machine for many of the bread recipes included in the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My friends and family think I'm a wonderful cook .... it's because I take the time to use the Joy of Cooking Cookbook. There are usually a few extra steps and a few extra ingredients required compared to other recipes in other cookbooks, but that's what makes each recipe extra special. Macaroi and cheese is now Baked Macroni and Salad dressings no longer come in a bottle! There's a new favorite recipe almost every day! Enjoy the Joy of Cooking!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is great because it is a comprehensive reference on how to cook anything. The recipes are easy to follow and delicious (check out barley risotto, yum!) I always refer to it when I want to look up a particular food or ingredient and then I peruse their colleciton of recipes for that ingredient. It is great for novices because it explains cooking techniques as well as recipes. I feel this is a must have book.