Julie

Julie

by Catherine Marshall

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Overview

Will the dam hold?

Julie Wallace has always wanted to write. Trying to escape the Great Depression, Julie's father buys the Alderton Sentinel, a small-town newspaper in flood-prone Alderton, Pennsylvania, and moves his family there. As flash floods ominously increase, Julie's investigative reporting uncovers secrets that could endanger the entire community.

Julie, the newspaper, and her family are thrown into a perilous standoff with the owners of the steel mills as they investigate the conditions of the immigrant laborers. As the Alderton Sentinel and Julie take on a more aggressive role to reform these conditions, seething tensions come to a head.

When a devastating tragedy follows a shocking revelation, Julie's courage and strength are tested. Will truth and justice win, or will Julie lose everything she holds dear?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781683701347
Publisher: Gilead Publishing
Publication date: 04/17/2018
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 400
Sales rank: 400,892
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.98(d)

About the Author

Catherine Marshall, New York Times best-selling author of thirty books, is best known for her novel Christy. Based on the life of her mother, a teacher of mountain children in poverty-stricken Tennessee, Christy captured the hearts of millions and became apopular CBS television series. As her mother reminisced around the kitchen table at Evergreen Farm, Catherine probed for details and insights into the rugged lives of these Appalachian highlanders.A beloved inspirational writer and speaker, Catherine's enduring career spanned four decades and six continents, and reached over 30 million readers.

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CHAPTER 1

Our 1928 Willys-Knight had been climbing for at least ten miles, one hairpin turn after another, under a threatening sky. Though it was early September, the temperature was close to ninety degrees. There was a stillness in the air and a steady buildup of dark, lowering cloud banks to the east.

"Kenneth, the car's overheated!" Mother's voice was anxious.

"I'm aware of it," Father replied. Rivulets of perspiration were streaming down the back of his neck.

"Shouldn't we stop and let the radiator cool off?"

"I will, Louise, as soon as I can find a place to pull over." There had been increasing irritation between my parents ever since Mother, custodian of the map, had suggested some sixty miles back that the most direct road to Alderton was west on Route 30. Dad did not agree and had chosen Route 143, which approached Alderton from the northeast. A mistake. Route 143 was poorly paved and endlessly curving.

We were all on edge this late summer day of 1934. Four consecutive days on the road, seven-hundred-odd miles, four blowouts, five people jostled all the way from Timmeton, Alabama, to western Pennsylvania. Mother had driven most of those miles because I had yet to obtain my driver's license and my father was still having those attacks of malaria.

For most of the trip I had been shut up in the back seat with the animal energy of Tim, eleven, and Anne-Marie, nine. Every waking moment my younger brother and sister had wriggled and fidgeted, poked one another, and me, and chattered incessantly. I felt bruised and battered, my clothes a mess.

In an effort to ease the tension, Mother began giving us a running commentary on what we would see on Dad's alternative route into Alderton. "We'll be going down Seven Mile Mountain now. The map shows a little village not too far ahead. Yancyville, it's called. Oh, and here's something interesting," she added. "A lake." She held the map to get a closer look. "It's called Lake Kissawha. Indian name, I suppose."

As she spoke, dark clouds suddenly blanketed the landscape. Then the sky emptied. There were no separate raindrops; rather it seemed as if giant hands had overturned cloud-buckets. Lightning and thunderclaps followed — eerie, terrifying. And at that moment white steam began to rise from the car radiator.

Anne-Marie started to cry softly. Hunched over the wheel, Dad searched through the downpour for a place to pull off. There was a bump; we skidded off the road and began sliding to the right. Frantically Dad twisted the wheel, fighting the slide. No use. We ended up with the two rear wheels in a water-filled ditch.

As Dad turned off the ignition, his hands were shaking.

"Now let's all stay calm," Mother said crisply. "Nobody's hurt. We'll be all right."

After about five minutes the deluge stopped and the sky lightened. Gratefully we rolled down the windows; the closed car had been like a steam oven. Dad started the engine but the back wheels only spun crazily, churning mud. Gunning the motor merely sank the heavy old Willys deeper into the ditch.

Then we heard a heart-stopping sound — a roaring, crashing noise from the steep slope just above us. Startled, we looked up to our right and saw a river of water pouring down the side of the mountain. It crashed onto and over the car, water gushing through the open windows, soaking us. Then it surged across the road, tore off a route marker, and churned down the asphalt surface for fifty feet before plunging over the side of the mountain to our left, sweeping along rocks and small trees in its path.

We sat silently in the car, paralyzed by our narrow escape. Then dazedly, almost like a film in slow motion, my parents began mopping up the water in the front seat. Suddenly Dad's body slumped forward against the steering wheel. I could see a vein throbbing in his neck.

In a panic I clambered over Tim and opened the car door. "I'll go for help," I said, catching Mother's distressed eyes.

High school tennis had strengthened my legs. I ran back along the road we had traveled, avoiding the debris and the worst puddles. My eyes were searching the downhill side of the road, now to my right, for the building I thought I had glimpsed through the trees.

Yes, there it was, some kind of rustic lodge or inn near the shore of the lake. The side road I turned into was steep, slippery underfoot. As I ran, I spied in the distance the figure of a man in a green sports shirt emerging from the building.

At that instant my foot caught in a fallen branch. Down I went, sprawled on all fours — mud all over the front of my skirt, spattered on my blouse and face.

"I say, what a nasty tumble —"

The man was now standing over me, hand outstretched. He was younger than I had thought.

"My family needs help," I stammered, spurning his hand and scrambling to my feet. I pointed toward the road. "Up there."

"Was there an accident?"

"Yes, our car slid into the ditch. I think my father's hurt."

"Should I call an ambulance?"

"I don't know."

"Let's have a look." He set off at a rapid pace, with me trotting to keep up, trying to get my tangled hair out of my eyes and wiping furiously at the mud.

"Beastly day for motoring. Tell me what happened," he tossed over his shoulder at me.

A clipped English accent, reddish-blond hair. He seems nice, I thought. "We were driving up from Alabama. My father's Kenneth Wallace, the new publisher of the Alderton Sentinel."

At the main road I pointed the way toward our disabled car. After rounding several curves we saw it. My father was still in the driver's seat, but I rejoiced to see that he was sitting upright.

The young man bounded forward. "I'm Randolph Wilkinson. Are you injured, sir? How can I help?" Insisting that he was all right, my father climbed slowly out of the Willys. By now Mother too was out on the road to greet us, with Tim and Anne-Marie tumbling after.

"Julie!" Mother cried. "What happened to you?"

To my relief the two men became absorbed in examining the car as I explained my fall to Mother while wringing out my sopping skirt. What a way to meet a stranger ... fall on my face in the mud practically at his feet.

Brushing aside Mother's protests, my father climbed back in behind the steering wheel, turned on the ignition, and began a gentle rocking motion — forward, back, forward. As the rocking pattern stepped up, the Englishman didn't hesitate to step into the water behind the car, flex his muscular arms, and at the right moment give a mighty shove. The heavy old Willys lurched forward from the ditch onto the road.

"By Jove, we did it!" Our rescuer shot one hand into the air while Tim and Anne-Marie whooped in triumph.

Dad set the hand brake and climbed from the car.

"How can we thank you!"

"No need to." Mr. Wilkinson was looking at me again.

"But I insist that you come back to the inn for a cleanup. Can't go on as you are."

"Thanks so much," Dad replied. "But I think we're all right now."

"Kenneth, please," Mother urged. "Let's accept the young man's offer."

"And Dad, don't forget the radiator," Tim put in.

My father grimaced. "I'd forgotten. Our water boiled over, Mr. Wilkinson."

This time the Englishman climbed behind the wheel. He drove several hundred yards down the mountain to what he called the back entrance to the inn. We wound through a woodland, then crossed over the top of a tall dam. To our right was an immense lake; below, on our left, water from the spillway formed a gurgling stream.

After we pulled up in front of a large building, the Englishman showed Mother, Anne-Marie and me to a powder room off the front entrance hall. One glance at myself in the mirror made me shudder: my wavy light brown hair was hanging in stringy ropes; mud spots on my face gave the effect of chicken pox. I stared down at my filthy saddle shoes, my rumpled skirt and blouse, and groaned. I looked more like a lumpy twelve-year-old than almost eighteen. After cleaning up as best I could, I fled outside.

Lake Kissawha was larger than I had first thought. When we drove in, the far banks had been lost in mist. Now they were just visible, perhaps half a mile away. As I strolled down to the shore, I noticed that the steep face of the dam was a wild aggregation of loose rocks and boulders, with saplings and scrub pines growing out of the crevices.

Odd way to construct a dam, I mused. Then I turned and walked back to our car.

When our family reassembled by the Willys, the handsome Englishman was there to see us off. As I started to climb into the back seat he took my hand and held it for a moment. "I'm glad we met, Julie," he said.

Startled, I looked up into his hazel eyes. They were warm, sparked by a mischievous twinkle. Then, very slowly, he winked!

My eyes must have shown my confusion. I reddened, murmured something unintelligible and stepped into the back seat, aware that my legs were strangely weak.

Mr. Wilkinson then strongly urged us to go back a mile or so, where he said we would find a scenic spot called Lookout Point, which had a breathtaking view of Alderton and the whole valley. Though road weary and eager to end our long journey, we decided that a good first look at our new hometown would be well worth retracing our route.

A few minutes later, with Mother now at the wheel, we pulled into an asphalt parking area and climbed out of the car again. The dark angry clouds were now vanishing to the east. Through breaks in the overcast we could see the narrow Schuylkill Valley spread out below, surrounded by the towering Alleghenies, with Alderton on the valley floor.

I stood there fighting disappointment. Before leaving the flatness of Timmeton I had tried to visualize what it would be like living in the mountains. All afternoon we had been driving through glorious scenery, misty-blue peaks soaring over undulating ridges, each horseshoe bend opening a new and breathtaking vista. I could scarcely wait to see Alderton.

But spread below us now was something very different. Alderton looked pinched, hemmed in by the mountains. In many places the hills were denuded, the slopes pocked with slag heaps. The peace I had sensed in these mountain heights was gone. A dissident note had entered in — as if men and nature were antagonists.

We stood there in a tightly huddled family group, our eyes sweeping the landscape below us. For a moment no one said anything. I was feeling let down, betrayed, but dared not voice it.

Still, there was beauty mixed in with the ugliness. Just below us in the twilight Lake Kissawha was like a multicolored mirror. A sparkling stream, like a glistening strand of pearls, wound down Seven Mile Mountain to Alderton. Consulting the map, Mother reported that this was the Sequanoto River, that it was joined by Brady Creek just north of Alderton, and that the combined streams flowed through the center of town.

Father, pale and drawn, pointed out the two bridges spanning the river, including the railroad bridge built at the turn of the century. On his previous visit here, local citizens had described it as an architectural monstrosity because of its ponderous concrete arches. As our eyes searched the town, tongues of flame would leap from tall brick smokestacks, then die again. A thick sooty haze hovered above the scene.

"That's the Yoder Iron and Steel Works," Dad said, indicating the smokestacks. "Employs over twelve hundred men. Headed by Tom McKeever, a tough old man who runs this town, I'm told."

"Including the Sentinel?" Mother asked.

My father shrugged. "I don't think he'll pay much attention to us." He pointed again. "There's the Trantler Wireworks, a Yoder subsidiary. Makes barbed wire and such. Those and the Pennsylvania Railroad yards are the town's chief industries. See the yards on the east side of Railroad Bridge — apparently a major east-west transfer point." From where we stood we could see two roundhouses surrounded by glittering skeins of tracks.

"Just like a model train set!" Tim breathed excitedly.

"Sure looks that way from here, son."

Dad then indicated the residential areas, mostly tucked into the hills, and a section of drab gray houses east of town. "Workers' houses," Dad explained. "They're called the Lowlands." The name fit; they were certainly the ugliest part of this industrial center of over twenty thousand people. Alderton was a stark contrast to quiet Timmeton, where our family had lived for almost nine years.

With sudden nostalgia my mind drifted back to those last days of our uprooting ... packing boxes, crates and steamer trunks to be sent by rail, the last visits to my favorite places, the final good-byes.

Mary Beth. Sandra Lee. Merv, the boy down the street who was so sure I was to marry him someday. How could I start in, my last year of high school, to make all new friends?

There had been pain in leaving the setting, too: the huge century-old oak trees that arched over Macon Street like the green-vaulted roof of a cathedral. There are precious things that you can't pack and take with you, like the all-pervasive fragrance of the honeysuckle. Would there be honeysuckle in the North? I would miss the drapery of purple wisteria that all but smothered the old woodshed in our back yard.

I looked at my parents as they stared silently at the town below us. My father's tall frame was stooped, neck muscles still twitching, eyes clouded, hands clenched tightly together. In contrast were Mother's firm, patrician features, her determined manner. How did they handle a change like this? I had no clue and could not bring myself to ask. I had always had trouble talking about whatever meant most to me. Shyness? The fear of something important to me being belittled or made fun of? I didn't know — only that I had always kept my joys and doubts locked inside myself.

Like my fears now for my father. Could Kenneth Timothy Wallace, prematurely gray at forty-one, who had known nothing but the Christian ministry, really turn overnight into a newspaper publisher?

Certainly the decision to buy the Alderton Sentinel had not been made lightly. I had always known that journalism was Dad's second love, had sometimes suspected it was his first. Dad remembered with sentimental delight his two years of college newspaper work; he had written continually for church publications and local newspapers ever since. The Timmeton Times had printed his weekly column, built around the relevance for today of a selected verse of Scripture.

Then there had been all that trouble at my father's church, followed by his illness. Apparently he had contracted malaria during a summer preaching mission in rural Louisiana. It became so bad that he had to be hospitalized for almost a month. Soon after that, the letter had arrived from Paul Proctor, one of Father's college friends, who owned a weekly newspaper in western Pennsylvania. Would Ken like to buy it?

For weeks my parents discussed the offer, both openly and behind closed doors. It came out that we had the necessary money in a savings fund — which had providentially survived the recent bank closings — a $15,000 inheritance from the estate of Mother's Aunt Stella. The money had initially been set aside to provide a college education for myself, Tim, and Anne-Marie.

All of us agreed that Dad should take a week's trip to Alderton to go over the facilities. If it seemed right, he should look for a place to live. When he returned, the decision had been made. My father felt he "had a call" to publish and edit the Sentinel.

But questions had kept rising in me and would not be put down. How could someone who loved people as much as my father did leave the ministry? What had gone wrong at his church? Had Dad lost his faith? Why had God let so many bad things happen to such a good man? This depression year of 1934 seemed a poor time to start a new business venture. Inside me churned the suspicion that even in the best of times, my father's skills were not really attuned to the business world.

One thing was certain: the Wallace family was being plunged into unknown adventure in this unappealing town, Alderton.

I awoke the following Saturday morning in my still-strange bedroom in our new home to the sound of rain drumming on the roof. No matter. For over two years now I had enjoyed waking up early when there was no school, so that I could write down my thoughts.

Something about the hour of dawn intrigued me, drew me. In Timmeton it had been the quietness — silence so intense as to be almost palpable. Here in Alderton, the early morning calm was shattered by the distant clanging and screeching of engine whistles in the railroad yards.

My Timmeton classmates, all of whom slept late on Saturday, had made fun of my early morning rendezvous. This taught me that a person who is different can also be rejected. After considering this fact carefully, I decided that I liked being different and would accept the cost.

(Continues…)


Excerpted from "Julie"
by .
Copyright © 1995 Marshall-LeSourd LLC.
Excerpted by permission of Gilead Publishing.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Julie 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
lolly-pops More than 1 year ago
I read JULIE years and years ago, when it first came out, as my aunt had a copy, and I didn't like it then as well as I liked Christy. I was wild about Christy. This, like Christy, is loosely based on Ms. Marshall's real life, as it is, as the introduction says, her story, fictionalized. The story starts off exciting, with the family miraculously saved from a flash flood. But from there it sort of drags. I am not a big fan of depression era stories, and I wasn't alive during the flooding or any of the events, and I'm sure readers who love depression era or more "modern" historical stories would love it. I requested a copy to review because I did love Christy so, and I wanted to give JULIE another chance. It still didn't grab me. I wanted to like it, and I did like parts of it. The British guy was a nice touch. And I cried with some of the events at the end of the book. If you like based-on-real-life stories or depression era stories, you might love JULIE. I was given a copy free. All opinions are my own.
Becky J Miller More than 1 year ago
In her lifetime, Catherine Marshall wrote nineteen books, two of the novels. Julie, her second novel and final book, may easily surpass them all. The foreword, written by Catherine’s husband, Leonard LeSourd, indicates she spent seven years developing the storyline, characters, and researching details of Julie. Within the pages of Julie’s story, Catherine’s dedication to her craft becomes obvious. Set in depression era Pennsylvania, Julie is a coming of age story, mingled with a bit of romance, scheming, heartache, and a lot of David vs. Goliath. Life changes dramatically for the Wallace family when Julie’s father gives up his full time pastorate in Alabama and moves almost one thousand miles away to become a newspaper editor. When her father uses money set aside for Julie’s college education to buy a fledgling newspaper, Julie must come to terms with the possibility of seeing both her dreams of attending college die, while settling for the mundane job of “proof-reader” instead of “writer.” Julie’s character possesses incredible depth, much more than one would expect of a typical eighteen-year old. Readers will appreciate her willingness to stand up for what she believes to be right, even in the face of incredible opposition. Cover to cover, this captivating story is sure to sustain any reader’s interest. ***The publisher provided a free book. However, all opinions included in this review are entirely my own.
ARS8 More than 1 year ago
Julie by author Catherine Marshall was a riveting book, and I do believe I may actually enjoy a bit more than Christy. Christy was a good book, but there was just something about Julie that really snagged my attention. This is a coming of age story about Julie Wallace and her family set during the Great Depression. Life is financially hard for them, like many other others during that time, but this family has also been hurt by the church and affected by illness. So they have decided to move away from their home state to a small factory town in Pennsylvania. Instead of being a pastor, Julie’s dad is now the editor of a small floundering newspaper which she hopes to write article for to further and fulfill her dream of becoming a writer. Along with her father, Julie, her mother and younger brother and sister set out on this new adventure. This adventure is wrought with many challenges. Julie who is seventeen is still very young and has many experiences yet she must go through with new friendships and especially romantic encounters with young men. With the back drop of the Great Depression, social injustices with factory workers, and prejudices of the day, there is an even more foreboding danger. It is the ominous dam that holds back the water from the town. There was some great information on dams that I learned in this story and due to the fact that I have experienced flooding as well, this story became all the more real to me. There is heartache and some plot points I had hoped did not happen, but it did paint a pretty accurate picture of a young girl coming of age with her family in the depression era US and meeting head on some extraordinary challenges. There were good lessons to be learned as well. I received a complimentary copy of this novel. I was not required to post a positive review and all views and opinions are my own.
MaureenST More than 1 year ago
Oh, how I loved reading this book and walking in Julie Paige’s shoes, and what a kind, loving young woman the author has given us. I have long been an admirer of Catherine Marshall, starting back as a teen when I read “A Man Called Peter”. The author makes you feel for the injustice of big business, and the “I don’t care attitude”, and then then the bullying, all because you have concerns and disagree. Warning once you start this you won’t be able to put it down, and have the tissues handy, there are some really sad parts, but you won’t regret reading this one. I received this book through Just Read and the Publisher Evergreen Farm, and was not required to give a positive review.
millstreetreader More than 1 year ago
Recently, both of Marshall's novels have been re-released with new covers, ready for new audiences to be captured by the powerful stories. And of course, like me, many who loved the books years ago are rediscovering them. Several months ago I reviewed CHRISTY; now it is time to do the same for JULIE. As in most coming of age stories, main character Julie changes dramatically throughout the book. A newcomer to Alderton, Julie helps her father try to keep their newly purchased newspaper afloat, all while surviving her senior year in a new school. On the school girl side, readers find Julie maneuvering through first dates, a major crush (or is it more), and periods of confusion over how she can be attracted to more than person and for different reasons. But more and more, serious adult issues and concerns occupy her thoughts. First of all, she comes to accept that her family will not be able to send her to college, so she focuses on writing well enough that her father will let her do more than proofread and edit. Perhaps it was the newness to Pennsylvania that drew Julie to trying to understand the workings and inequalities of life in a company town. It is that curiosity that leads Julie to write about the conditions at McKeever Steel Mill and also to question the safety of an earthen damn owned by Mr. McKeever and his hunt club. Eventually her writing and the social work of Pastor Spencer Meloy fuel a divide in the town. While the story of a young girl growing up, JULIE is so much more. The fight for and against unions and the power of the rich over the poor is central to the book. But we are also reminded that it was the ingenuity and tenacity of the powerful that made industry thrive and grow. The role of the church is questioned as Pastor Spencer Meloy focuses on helping the poorer steel workers. And then there is the mysterious Dean Fleming and his unwavering faith in Julie's family. Catherine Marshall shows us the best and the worst of humanity and teaches us much about faith, strength and family in a captivating story. Some readers may find the style of writing dated or slow, but I thoroughly enjoyed revisiting Marshall's last novel. I received a copy of this title from Gilead Publishing and JUSTREAD tours. I was not required to write a review.
Mocha-with-Linda More than 1 year ago
I love that Gilead Publishing is reissuing Catherine Marshall's classic, beloved novels, Christy and Julie. While Christy is based on the life of her mother, Catherine Marshall found inspiration for Julie some of her own memories of life as an eighteen-year-old in Keyser, West Virginia during the Great Depression. This multi-layered tale of the Wallace family and their relocation to Alderton provides an authentic and touching portrait of life in a small town whose main employer is a steel mill owned by a man who rules the company - and the town - with intimidation and a "my way or the highway-or else" attitude. As someone who did not grow up in a pro-union environment, I learned a bit about the circumstances that gave birth to the movement for employee rights and was aghast at the attitudes displayed by the owners toward the working men and women who toiled with so little recompense. Julie and her family endeared themselves to me from the opening pages as they attempted to put behind them the life and heartaches they had experienced prior to their move and as Julie's father struggled with his personal demons. I particularly enjoyed Julie's work as a proofreader for the fledgling newspaper, which reminded me of my own days as a copy editor of my high school newspaper. I know I read this book when it was first released back in 1984, but I read it with new appreciation now that I've gained a few decades of life experience. While I probably identified more with Julie on my first read in my twenties, the adversities experienced by her parents stirred me most this time around. So many nuggets of truth can be gleaned from these pages. Don't miss this classic novel in its newly republished form! Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a copy of this book free from Gilead Publishing for a blog tour. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
Mocha-with-Linda More than 1 year ago
I love that Gilead Publishing is reissuing Catherine Marshall's classic, beloved novels, Christy and Julie. While Christy is based on the life of her mother, Catherine Marshall found inspiration for Julie some of her own memories of life as an eighteen-year-old in Keyser, West Virginia during the Great Depression. This multi-layered tale of the Wallace family and their relocation to Alderton provides an authentic and touching portrait of life in a small town whose main employer is a steel mill owned by a man who rules the company - and the town - with intimidation and a "my way or the highway-or else" attitude. As someone who did not grow up in a pro-union environment, I learned a bit about the circumstances that gave birth to the movement for employee rights and was aghast at the attitudes displayed by the owners toward the working men and women who toiled with so little recompense. Julie and her family endeared themselves to me from the opening pages as they attempted to put behind them the life and heartaches they had experienced prior to their move and as Julie's father struggled with his personal demons. I particularly enjoyed Julie's work as a proofreader for the fledgling newspaper, which reminded me of my own days as a copy editor of my high school newspaper. I know I read this book when it was first released back in 1984, but I read it with new appreciation now that I've gained a few decades of life experience. While I probably identified more with Julie on my first read in my twenties, the adversities experienced by her parents stirred me most this time around. So many nuggets of truth can be gleaned from these pages. Don't miss this classic novel in its newly republished form! Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a copy of this book free from Gilead Publishing for a blog tour. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
Deana0326 More than 1 year ago
There is nothing better for a reader than to feel like they have been swept into a time period and experience exactly what the characters are facing. This book has all the markings of an epic adventure that is captured by pure talent and focused details. I loved every minute I spent reading this wonderful story. I was transported back to 1935 and met a young woman so full of life, that I wanted to be friends with her. Julie is the heart beat of this story and will forever have a place of prominence in my heart of the true meaning of faith and perseverance. I admired her for so many reasons. Her desire to be a journalist was so inspiring it reminds us to never give up on our dreams. I loved how she helped her dad at the newspaper doing whatever he asked her to do. Times were hard for the people in the town Julie's family moved to. There wasn't much money to survive on but the family never complained. I loved the compassion that was showed by several characters toward the needy and despondent families. What really intrigued me was the vivid description of the steel mill. The employees worked long hours with little pay and Julie became interested in the inner workings of a huge company like the mill. I know the employees were mistreated but they had little power to do anything until talks of a union started spreading. I could see the groups gathering and agreeing that it was time to speak up. This all leads up to a story that kept me glued to the pages as I read as fast as I could. It was no surprise that management wasn't happy with the newspaper when it seemed they were on the the opposite side of the owners. Danger lurks for Julie and her family as feathers get ruffled in the uproar of union talks. As this is going on, I could feel the tension build and knew something big was about to happen. I don't want to ruin the story for anyone, so I will say that the tragedy that happens will tear families apart, weave a destructive path to the town and forever change the lives of Alderton. The author captures the terror and pain with compassion and brought tears to my eyes as the event unfolded. It is evident that the author did much research to add to the historical value of the story and it heightened the book with precise information. There is so much in this book that will have readers thinking and examining themselves. Are we still showing prejudice to others? Do we willingly lend a hand to our neighbors? Will we stand up for our beliefs no matter what? Thank you for writing a book that reminds us "to love one another as Christ loves the church." I received a copy of this book from JustRead Publicity Tours. The review is my own opinion.
Deana0326 More than 1 year ago
There is nothing better for a reader than to feel like they have been swept into a time period and experience exactly what the characters are facing. This book has all the markings of an epic adventure that is captured by pure talent and focused details. I loved every minute I spent reading this wonderful story. I was transported back to 1935 and met a young woman so full of life, that I wanted to be friends with her. Julie is the heart beat of this story and will forever have a place of prominence in my heart of the true meaning of faith and perseverance. I admired her for so many reasons. Her desire to be a journalist was so inspiring it reminds us to never give up on our dreams. I loved how she helped her dad at the newspaper doing whatever he asked her to do. Times were hard for the people in the town Julie's family moved to. There wasn't much money to survive on but the family never complained. I loved the compassion that was showed by several characters toward the needy and despondent families. What really intrigued me was the vivid description of the steel mill. The employees worked long hours with little pay and Julie became interested in the inner workings of a huge company like the mill. I know the employees were mistreated but they had little power to do anything until talks of a union started spreading. I could see the groups gathering and agreeing that it was time to speak up. This all leads up to a story that kept me glued to the pages as I read as fast as I could. It was no surprise that management wasn't happy with the newspaper when it seemed they were on the the opposite side of the owners. Danger lurks for Julie and her family as feathers get ruffled in the uproar of union talks. As this is going on, I could feel the tension build and knew something big was about to happen. I don't want to ruin the story for anyone, so I will say that the tragedy that happens will tear families apart, weave a destructive path to the town and forever change the lives of Alderton. The author captures the terror and pain with compassion and brought tears to my eyes as the event unfolded. It is evident that the author did much research to add to the historical value of the story and it heightened the book with precise information. There is so much in this book that will have readers thinking and examining themselves. Are we still showing prejudice to others? Do we willingly lend a hand to our neighbors? Will we stand up for our beliefs no matter what? Thank you for writing a book that reminds us "to love one another as Christ loves the church." I received a copy of this book from JustRead Publicity Tours. The review is my own opinion.
Deana0326 More than 1 year ago
There is nothing better for a reader than to feel like they have been swept into a time period and experience exactly what the characters are facing. This book has all the markings of an epic adventure that is captured by pure talent and focused details. I loved every minute I spent reading this wonderful story. I was transported back to 1935 and met a young woman so full of life, that I wanted to be friends with her. Julie is the heart beat of this story and will forever have a place of prominence in my heart of the true meaning of faith and perseverance. I admired her for so many reasons. Her desire to be a journalist was so inspiring it reminds us to never give up on our dreams. I loved how she helped her dad at the newspaper doing whatever he asked her to do. Times were hard for the people in the town Julie's family moved to. There wasn't much money to survive on but the family never complained. I loved the compassion that was showed by several characters toward the needy and despondent families. What really intrigued me was the vivid description of the steel mill. The employees worked long hours with little pay and Julie became interested in the inner workings of a huge company like the mill. I know the employees were mistreated but they had little power to do anything until talks of a union started spreading. I could see the groups gathering and agreeing that it was time to speak up. This all leads up to a story that kept me glued to the pages as I read as fast as I could. It was no surprise that management wasn't happy with the newspaper when it seemed they were on the the opposite side of the owners. Danger lurks for Julie and her family as feathers get ruffled in the uproar of union talks. As this is going on, I could feel the tension build and knew something big was about to happen. I don't want to ruin the story for anyone, so I will say that the tragedy that happens will tear families apart, weave a destructive path to the town and forever change the lives of Alderton. The author captures the terror and pain with compassion and brought tears to my eyes as the event unfolded. It is evident that the author did much research to add to the historical value of the story and it heightened the book with precise information. There is so much in this book that will have readers thinking and examining themselves. Are we still showing prejudice to others? Do we willingly lend a hand to our neighbors? Will we stand up for our beliefs no matter what? Thank you for writing a book that reminds us "to love one another as Christ loves the church." I received a copy of this book from JustRead Publicity Tours. The review is my own opinion.
amandainpa More than 1 year ago
I was very excited to read this when I found out that it is loosely based on the Johnstown flood. Johnstown is only a hop, skip, and a jump from where I live so I am very familiar with the story of the flood and have visited the site of the dam, the clubhouse, and the flood museum several times. Unfortunately, knowing so much about the flood seemed to taint my enjoyment of the book to some extent. I found it strange that the author mixed fictional and factual places together. It also was very strange to me that the flood depicted in the book was extremely similar to the actual Johnstown flood but then the Johnstown flood was referenced in the story (throughout the book, I was assuming that Alderton was Johnstown). Had I not known all the facts about the actual flood, I think I would have enjoyed the book a lot more. I also found that the story moved slowly…there was a lot in the book about the forming of unions, which didn’t particularly interest me. I did find the discussions about the steel mills interesting and learned quite a bit about the unjust ways blue collar workers were treated in the past. I also enjoyed learning about the newspaper business. Julie’s character wasn’t very likable to me…she was driven and determined, but I found something about her to be a bit off putting. I also really disliked the love quadrangle that was found in this book. It seemed like everyone was in love with this girl. Overall, this was a good historical book but I was not really a fan. I think many people who enjoy romance would like it though. I received a copy of this book from the publisher. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
amybooksy More than 1 year ago
Julie is such a beautiful story. I love Julie from the start and admired her strength, courage, learning how to cope, and learning how to make a change. She was determined to do what was right. I was intrigued seeing this era and setting through Julie's eyes. Catherine Marshall did a fabulous job writing such a beautiful and well written book. I give Julie four stars and recommend it for those who love clean historicals. I received this book from the publisher, but was not required to write a review. This review is 100% m own honest opinion.
QueenJody More than 1 year ago
I read this book after reading Christy because I love Christy so much. I read somewhere that Christy was a book loosley based on the Catherine Marshell's mothers life and Julie is a book that is loosely based on the Catherin Marshell's life. True or not, both books are wonderful reads. I'm giving this one four stars only because I read it on the heals of Christy and was madly in love with that book (and the TV series); although this book is really good, it was just lacky a little something of what Christy had. Having said that, I highly recommend it. It's a coming of age story during the depression. It's moving and inspirational at the same time.
mytwogirlscrochet More than 1 year ago
I checked out this book in my school library when I was 12. I am 34 years old now and still pick up my coipies of Julie & Christy when I want a good read. Over the years I have never gotton tired of the story. Wonderful books I will pass on to my daughters.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really liked the Christy book she wrote so I thought I would like this one, and I did. An innocent story with moral values that you don't see too often unless you read nicholas sparks books. It shows the family putting together during difficult times.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Rach_Eliza More than 1 year ago
Julie is an 18 year old girl who lives during the depression. Julie's father Kenneth Wallace was a pastor in Alabama. He was having some health problems and decided that being a pastor was too stressful for him, so he bought a newspaper from a friend and moved to Pennsylvania. The book is about the family's struggle-Julie and her father's in particular-to make godly choices while a particular family who has a lot of influence in the town pressures them to ignore some suspicious activity/conditions in relation to a couple businesses they own. The family tries to close the Wallace's newspaper down when they refuse to yield to their demands.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
*Julie* is one of those odd titles in Christian fiction because the characters are quite human in their failings. They are imperfect in their faith and their life choices, and that fact proves a strength to the book. They are believable, and even though the setting is now many years out of context, the story line remains intriguing because human nature is essentially the same. This book is a must read for every young woman trying to 'find herself' and a wonderful weekend companion for those of us who no longer qualify as 'young.'
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am 14 years old and I think this book is wonderful.I was not able to put Julie down. I would highly recommend this book for everyone! It is wonderful.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is my second favorite in the world! (Christy being my favorite!) Catherine Marshall is fabulous.