Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar

by William Shakespeare
3.3 39

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Overview

Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare

Julius Caesar is one of Shakespeare's most majestic works. Set in the tumultuous days of ancient Rome, this play is renowned for its memorable characters and political intrigue, and it has been captivating audiences and readers since it was first presented more than 400 years ago. This invaluable new study guide to one of Shakespeare's greatest tragedies contains a selection of the finest criticism through the centuries on Julius Caesar, including commentaries by such important critics as Ben Jonson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Kenneth Burke, and many others. Students will also benefit from the additional features in this volume, including an introduction by Harold Bloom, an accessible summary of the plot, an analysis of several key passages, a comprehensive list of characters, a biography of Shakespeare, essays discussing the main currents of criticism in each century since Shakespeare's time, and more.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940025839675
Publisher: H. Holt and company, 1904
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 296 KB

About the Author

William Shakespeare was born in April 1564 in the town of Stratford-upon-Avon, on England’s Avon River. When he was eighteen, he married Anne Hathaway. The couple had three children—an older daughter Susanna and twins, Judith and Hamnet. Hamnet, Shakespeare’s only son, died in childhood. The bulk of Shakespeare’s working life was spent in the theater world of London, where he established himself professionally by the early 1590s. He enjoyed success not only as a playwright and poet, but also as an actor and shareholder in an acting company. Although some think that sometime between 1610 and 1613 Shakespeare retired from the theater and returned home to Stratford, where he died in 1616, others believe that he may have continued to work in London until close to his death.
Barbara A. Mowat is Director of Research emerita at the Folger Shakespeare Library, Consulting Editor of Shakespeare Quarterly, and author of The Dramaturgy of Shakespeare’s Romances and of essays on Shakespeare’s plays and their editing.
Paul Werstine is Professor of English at the Graduate School and at King’s University College at Western University. He is a general editor of the New Variorum Shakespeare and author of Early Modern Playhouse Manuscripts and the Editing of Shakespeare and of many papers and articles on the printing and editing of Shakespeare’s plays.

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Julius Caesar 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 39 reviews.
gemesi More than 1 year ago
Whether for High School drama class or actor's study, Arden is always the first one to look at when preparing for a role. The Folio and modern spellings are listed with their meanings and the Bard's source material is often shown, in this case, Plutarch. I will recommend Arden for any play to research.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The play is one of the only plays by Shakespeare to have a name that is not the same as the tragic hero (Brutus). A tragic hero has a rise and a fall during the play, and Shakespeare acknowledges that Brutus is the hero at the end of the play.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was very happy to find that the sample includes the whole play, but excluded part of the mini Shakesphere biography in the appendicies. This edition itself is very good, but does not have the numbers which tell you which verse you are on.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Full play with scene by scene anaalyais. Great deal!!!!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really good book, but what i dont get is why the book is called "Julius Ceasar". Its a five part play, but Ceasar is dead by the third act.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought it was a pretty good book for Lit class in 6th grade but at my school I am tought at a highschool level at CSPA it was a little confusing while it was in Shakespeariean... Thats what we call it! But my awesome lit teacher translated it into moderen day eniglish. So as I said before, pretty good!
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