Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar

by William Shakespeare
3.3 39

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Overview

Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare

Julius Caesar is one of Shakespeare's most majestic works. Set in the tumultuous days of ancient Rome, this play is renowned for its memorable characters and political intrigue, and it has been captivating audiences and readers since it was first presented more than 400 years ago. This invaluable new study guide to one of Shakespeare's greatest tragedies contains a selection of the finest criticism through the centuries on Julius Caesar, including commentaries by such important critics as Ben Jonson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Kenneth Burke, and many others. Students will also benefit from the additional features in this volume, including an introduction by Harold Bloom, an accessible summary of the plot, an analysis of several key passages, a comprehensive list of characters, a biography of Shakespeare, essays discussing the main currents of criticism in each century since Shakespeare's time, and more.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780671421380
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group
Publication date: 05/21/1976

About the Author

William Shakespeare (c. 26 April 1564 – 23 April 1616) was an English playwright, renowned by many as the world's greatest writer in the English Language. Among his plays are "Romeo and Juliet", "Hamlet", "Macbeth" to name but a few.

REED CRANDALL was born in Winslow, Indiana. After graduating, he moved to New York at the invitation of a publisher of children's books, but after illustrating just one cover, Reed left the company. He then went to work for the NEA Syndicate as an editorial cartoonist before finally landing a job at the Eisner-Iger shop on Manhattan's east side. At this time he worked alongside such greats as Will Eisner, Lou Fine, Paul Gustafson, Alex Kotzky, Jerry Iger and Fred Guardineer. Almost all of Crandall's output at this time went to the Quality Comics Group which published such titles as Hit Comics, Crack Comics, Smash Comics, Military Comics and Uncle Sam which later became Blackhawk Comics.

In the beginning, one of Reed's chores was inking Lou Fine's wonderful Military Comics covers. Shortly afterwards, Quality's publisher Everett M. Arnold saw his beautiful fine-lined renderings, he reportedly hired him exclusively. Some of the features he drew included 'The Ray', 'Firebrand', 'Hercules', 'Uncle Sam', 'Dollman' and 'The Blackhawks'. Before long Reed was illustrating all of the 'Blackhawk' and 'Dollman' stories, which he continued to draw for almost fifteen years.

When Quality scaled down their line, Reed Crandall began doing work for EC. Crandall drew stories for EC's SF, Suspenstory and Horror, as well as nearly all the New Direction and Picto-Fiction titles. When EC & Quality both folded comic production in 1955/56, Reed did occasional work for Atlas/Marvel.

By 1960 he landed a contract with Treasure Chest Comics and drew stories for this educational Catholic comic for twelve years. He also drew the giveaway comic 'Buster Brown' for the Buster Brown Shoe Stores for several years. He teamed up with George Evans in the early 1960s to do work on the Gold Key titles The Twilight Zone and Gilberton's Classics Illustrated.

In the mid 1960s he worked with Wallace Wood on 'Thunder Agents' and 'Dynamo' at Tower Comics, and also drew stories for King Comics's 'Flash Gordon' book. He contributed to James Warren's horror titles Eerie and Creepy, and did book illustration for the work of Edgar Rice Burroughs. Following a strok in 1974, Crandall had to stop his drawing activities. He passed away in Wichita, Kansas in 1982.

GEORGE EVANS, an artist from Harwood, Pennsylvania, debuted in the illustration field, and attended the Scranton Art School afterwards. After spending three years in the US airforces, he began his career in comics at Fiction House until 1950. There, he worked on among others 'Lost World', 'Senorita Rio', 'Air Heroes' and 'Tigerman'. He was also present at Fawcett, where he worked on 'Captain Marvel', 'Captain Video', 'Bob Colt' and a comic adaptation of the film 'When Worlds Collide'. During this period, he also took courses at the Art Students League in New York.

When Fawcett folded, he was brought over to EC Comics by Al Williamson, where he was hired immediately in 1953. Thanks to his technical knowledge of airplanes and machinery, Evans quickly became Kurtzman's favorite on 'Two Fisted Tales' and 'Frontline Combat', yet Evans preferred the freedom of working with Feldstein on the EC horror and SF titles 'The Haunt of Fear' and 'Weird Science'.

He also provided striking covers and stories for 'Crime SuspenStories' and 'Shock SupenStories'. In 1955, he drew covers and stories for the "New Direction" aviation title 'Aces High'.

When EC collapsed in 1956, he was brought over to Gilberton's 'Classics Illustrated' line. He adapted among others 'Romeo and Juliet', 'The Little Savage', 'Lord Jim', 'The Hunchback of the Notre Dame', and 'The Three Musketeers' to comics. He also did 'Space Conquerors' for Boy's Life magazine.

He began collaborations with DC Comics ('Blackhawk') and Gold Key ('Twilight Zone', 'Hercules Unchained') in the early 1960s. He also became George Wunder's assistant on the daily 'Terry and the Pirates', a capacity he held from 1960 to 1973.

In 1964 and 1965, he was back in horror comics, with contributions to Warren's Eerie and Creepy. From 1968, he produced various stories about the supernatural for DC Comics. In 1980, he succeeded Archie Goodwin and Al Williamson on 'Secret Agent Corrigan', a series he continued until 1996.

During the 1980s and 1990s, he also drew for publishers like Pacific ('Vanguard Illustrated'), Eclipse ('Airboy'), Marvel ('The Nam') and Dark Horse ('Classic Star Wars'), while also illustrating advertising campaigns. He retired in Mount Joy, Pennsylvania, where his final work was doing the 'Flash Gordon' Sunday page on 21 January 2001.

LEONARD BRANDT COLE had worked as art director for a lithography outfit, before entering the comic book field during the Golden Age in the early 1940's. He was mainly a cover illustrator for titles like Suspense Comics and Contact Comics. In his early work, he always used basic, flat colors and produced what he called "poster color covers". Illustrating over 1500 covers, Cole drew everything from funny animals to superheroes to jungle girls and sci-fi. A science fiction fan, Cole would often slip rocket ships and ray guns onto books such as 'Captain Flight' and 'Contact Comics' which were supposed to be devoted to contemporary aviation.

As for interior artwork, Cole did pencils and/or inks on several features for Holyoke Publications, Gilberton and Farrell. Cole also published comic books through Star Publications, producing various crime, terror, jungle and romance titles in the late 1940s and 1950s. He was art director and editor at Dell Publishing in the early 1960s. He has mainly done commercial art and design from the mid 1960s onwards, working among others on audio-visuals for University Films.

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Julius Caesar 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 39 reviews.
gemesi More than 1 year ago
Whether for High School drama class or actor's study, Arden is always the first one to look at when preparing for a role. The Folio and modern spellings are listed with their meanings and the Bard's source material is often shown, in this case, Plutarch. I will recommend Arden for any play to research.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The play is one of the only plays by Shakespeare to have a name that is not the same as the tragic hero (Brutus). A tragic hero has a rise and a fall during the play, and Shakespeare acknowledges that Brutus is the hero at the end of the play.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was very happy to find that the sample includes the whole play, but excluded part of the mini Shakesphere biography in the appendicies. This edition itself is very good, but does not have the numbers which tell you which verse you are on.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Full play with scene by scene anaalyais. Great deal!!!!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really good book, but what i dont get is why the book is called "Julius Ceasar". Its a five part play, but Ceasar is dead by the third act.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought it was a pretty good book for Lit class in 6th grade but at my school I am tought at a highschool level at CSPA it was a little confusing while it was in Shakespeariean... Thats what we call it! But my awesome lit teacher translated it into moderen day eniglish. So as I said before, pretty good!
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