The Jungle Book

The Jungle Book


$6.91 $8.99 Save 23% Current price is $6.91, Original price is $8.99. You Save 23%.
View All Available Formats & Editions

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Eligible for FREE SHIPPING


The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling, Jamie Iaconis

The Jungle Book tells the story of Mowgli, a young boy abandoned in the jungle of India and raised by a pack of wolves. With the help of Bagheera, a wise black panther, and a bear called Baloo, the wolves teach Mowgli the ways and laws of the jungle.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781493756261
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
Publication date: 11/12/2013
Pages: 200
Product dimensions: 8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.42(d)
Age Range: 4 Years

About the Author

Rudyard Kipling was born in Bombay (now known as Mumbai), India, but returned with his parents to England at the age of five. Among Kipling’s best-known works are The Jungle Book, Just So Stories, and the poems “Mandalay” and “Gunga Din.” Kipling was the first English-language writer to receive the Nobel Prize for literature (1907) and was among the youngest to have received the award. 

Jerry Pinkney is one of America’s most admired children’s book illustrators. He has won the Caldecott Medal and five Caldecott Honors, five Coretta Scott King Awards, the Coretta Scott King–Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement, the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, the Society of Illustrators’ Original Art Show Lifetime Achievement Award, and many other prizes and honors. Jerry Pinkney lives with his wife, author Gloria Jean Pinkney, in Westchester County, New York. You can visit him online at

In His Own Words...

"I grew up in a small house in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. I was a middle child of six. I started drawing as far back as I can remember, at the age of four or five. My brothers drew, and I guess in a way I was mimicking them. I found I enjoyed the act of putting marks on paper. It gave me a way of creating my own space and quiet time, as well as a way of expressing myself. You can imagine six children competing for attention and to be heard. I would sit, watching and drawing.

"In first grade I had the opportunity to draw a large picture of a fire engine on the blackboard. I was complimented and encouraged to draw more. The attention felt good, and I wanted more. I was not a terrific reader or adept speller in my growing-up years, and I felt insecure in those areas. Drawing helped me build my self-esteem and feel good about myself, and, with hard work, I graduated from elementary school with honors.

"I attended an all-black elementary school, and I gained a strong sense of self and an appreciation of my own culture there. But Roosevelt Junior High was integrated. There I had many friends, both white and black, at a time when there was little mixing socially in school. There the spark for my curiosity about people was lit. You can see this interest and fascination with people of different cultures throughout my work.

"My formal art training started at Dobbins Vocational High School, and upon graduation I received a scholarship to the Philadelphia Museum College of Art. My major was advertising and design. The most exciting classes for me were drawing, painting, and printmaking. It is no wonder I turned to illustrating and designing books. For me the book represents the ultimate in graphics: first, as a designer, considering space, page size, number of pages, and type size; then, as an illustrator, dealing with the aesthetics of line, color, and form.

"There were three books that somehow magically came into my possession in the early sixties: The Wind in the Willows, illustrated by Arthur Rackham; The Wonder Clock, illustrated by Howard Pyle; and Rain Makes Applesauce, illustrated by Marvin Bileck. You can see those influences in my art today. Later, my work was greatly influenced by such African American artists as Charles White, Romare Bearden, and Jacob Lawrence.

"From the very beginning of my career in illustrating books, research has been important. I do as much as possible on a given subject, so that I live the experience and have a vision of the people and places. To capture a sense of realism for characters in my work, I use models that resemble the people I want to portray. My wife, Gloria Jean (also an author), and I keep a closetful of old clothes to dress up the models, and I have the models act out the story. Photos are taken to aid me in better understanding body language and facial expressions. Once I have that photo in front of me I have freedom, because the more you know, the more you can be inventive.

"For illustrating stories about animals, I keep a large reference file of over a hundred books on nature and animals. The first step in envisioning a creature is for me to pretend to be that particular animal. I think about its size and the sounds it makes, how it moves (slowly or quickly), and where it lives. I try to capture the feeling of the creature, as well as its true-to-life characteristics. There are times when the stories call for the animals to be anthropomorphic, and I've used photographs of myself posing as the animal characters.

"It still amazes me how much the projects I have illustrated have given back to me in terms of personal and artistic satisfaction. They have given me the opportunity to use my imagination, to draw, to paint, to travel through the voices of the characters in the stories, and, above all else, to touch children."

Peter Glassman is the owner of Books of Wonder, the New York City bookstore and publisher specializing in new and old imaginative books for children. He is also the editor of the Books of Wonder Classics, a series of deluxe facsimiles and newly illustrated editions of timeless tales. And he is the author of The Wizard Next Door, illustrated by Steven Kellogg. Mr. Glassman lives in New York City.

Read an Excerpt

Mowg1i's Brothers

Now Chil the Kite brings home the night
That Mang the Bat sets free --
The herds are shut in byre and hut
For loosed till dawn are we.
This is the hour of pride and power,
Talon and tush and claw.
Oh, hear the call! -- Good hunting all
That keep the jungle Law!
Night Song in the Jungle

It was seven o'clock of a very warm evening in the Seeonee Hills when Father Wolf woke up from his day's rest, scratched himself, yawned, and spread out his paws one after the other to get rid of the sleepy feeling in their tips. Mother Wolf lay with her big gray nose dropped across her four tumbling, squealing cubs, and the moon shone into the mouth of the cave where they all lived. "Augrh!" said Father Wolf, "it is time to hunt again." And he was going to spring downhill when a little shadow with a bushy tail crossed the threshold and whined: "Good luck go with you, 0 Chief of the Wolves; and good luck and strong white teeth go with the noble children, that they may never forget the hungry in this world. "

It was the jackal -- Tabaqui the Dish-licker -- and the wolves of India despise Tabaqui because he runs about making mischief, and telling tales, and eating rags and pieces of leather from the village rubbish heaps. But they are afraid of him too, because Tabaqui, more than anyone else in the jungle, is apt to go mad, and then he forgets that he was ever afraid of anyone, and runs through the forest biting everything in his way. Even the tiger runs and hides when little Tabaqui goes mad, for madness is the most disgraceful thing that can overtake a wild creature. We call it hydrophobia,but they call it dewanee -- the madness -- and run.

"Enter, then, and look," said Father Wolf, stiffly, "but there is no food here."

"For a wolf, no," said Tabaqui, "but for so mean a person as myself a dry bone is a good feast. Who are we, the Gidur-log [the Jackal-People], to pick and choose?" He scuttled to the back of the cave, where he found the bone of a buck with some meat on it, and sat cracking the end merrily.

"All thanks for this good meal," he said, licking his lips. "How beautiful are the noble children! How large are their eyes! And so young too! Indeed, indeed, I might have remembered that the children of kings are men from the beginning."

Now, Tabaqui knew as well as anyone else that there is nothing so unlucky as to compliment children to their faces; and it pleased him to see Mother and Father Wolf look uncomfortable.

Tabaqui sat still, rejoicing in the mischief that he had made, and then he said spitefully:

"Shere Khan, the Big One, has shifted his hunting grounds. He will hunt among these hills for the next moon, so he has told me."

Shere Khan was the tiger who lived near the Wainganga River, twenty miles away.

"He has no right!" Father Wolf began angrily. "By the Law of the jungle he has no right to change his quarters without due warning. He will frighten every head of game within ten miles, and I -- I have to kill for two, these days."

"His mother did not call him Lungri [the Lame One] for nothing," said Mother Wolf, quietly. "He has been lame in one foot from his birth. That is why he has only killed cattle. Now the villagers of the Wainganga are angry with him, and he has come here to make our villagers angry. They will scour the jungle for him when he is far away, and we and our children must run when the grass is set alight. Indeed, we are very grateful to Shere Khan!"

"Shall I tell him of your gratitude?" said Tabaqui.

"Out!" snapped Father Wolf. "Out and hunt with thy master. Thou hast done harm enough for one night."

"I go," said Tabaqui, quietly. "Ye can hear Shere Khan below in the thickets. I might have saved myself the message."

Father Wolf listened, and below in the valley that ran down to a little river, he heard the dry, angry, snarly, singsong whine of a tiger who has caught nothing and does not care if all the jungle knows it.

"The fool!" said Father Wolf. "To begin a night's work with that noise! Does he think that our buck are like his fat Wainganga bullocks?"

"Hsh. It is neither bullock nor buck he hunts tonight," said Mother Wolf "It is Man." The whine had changed to a sort of humming purr that seemed to come from every quarter of the compass. It was the noise that bewilders woodcutters and gypsies sleeping in the open, and makes them run sometimes into the very mouth of the tiger.

"Man!" said Father Wolf, showing all his white teeth. "Faugh! Are there not enough beetles and frogs in the tanks that he must eat Man, and on our ground too!"

The Law of the jungle, which never orders anything without a reason, forbids every beast to eat Man except when he is killing to show his children how to kill, and then he must hunt outside the hunting grounds of his pack or tribe. The real reason for this is that man-killing means, sooner or later, the arrival of white men on elephants, with guns, and hundreds of brown men with gongs and rockets and torches. Then everybody in the jungle suffers. The reason the beasts give among themselves is that Man is the weakest and most defenseless of all living things, and it is unsportsmanlike to touch him. They say too -- and it is true -- that maneaters become mangy, and lose their teeth.

The purr grew louder, and ended in the full-throated "Aaarh!" of the tiger's charge.

Then there was a howl -- an untigerish howl -- from Shere Khan. "He has missed," said Mother Wolf "What is it?"

The Jungle Book. Copyright © by Rudyard Kipling. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Table of Contents

Mowgli's Brothers
Hunting-Song of the Seeonee Pack
Kaa's Hunting
Road-Song of the Bandar-Log
"Tiger! Tiger!"
Mowgli's Song
The White Seal
Darzee’s Chant
Toomai of the Elephants
Shiv and the Grasshopper
Her Majesty's Servants
Parade Song of the Camp-Animals

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"One of those rare books that I felt I was actually living as I read it."  —Michael Morpurgo

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Jungle Book 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 216 reviews.
Charles Wibert More than 1 year ago
This copy was atrocious in editing, spelling, format and anything else I can think of! It appeared to me that it had been copied by someone who didn' t know the English language. Although the price was cheap, it was too much for this copy. There were many cases of where a capital U was used in stead of double ll, symbols in stead of letters and very few pages without errors and many pages with more than one. Wasted money!
Ausonius More than 1 year ago
Are the two JUNGLE BOOKS (1895-96) by Rudyard Kipling for children or for adults? *** I say: for both. My six grandsons and two granddaughters are enthralled when I read to them of Bagheera the panther, Rikki-Tikki-Ravi the mongoose or Mowgli the man-cub raised by Father and Mother Wolf. And I myself have returned to Kipling after 50 years with renewed enthusiasm for his imagination, wisdom and deft ways to spin great yarns. *** Surprisingly the jungles of THE JUNGLE BOOKS are not just in Central India. They are wild places of Antarctica, Arctica and the great oceans. Kipling's jungles are "what if?" magical lands. They are border spaces where humans and animals are co-exist in varying degrees of noticing one other.What if animals were to communicate among themselves as well as we humans do? What if animals tamed by or captured by humans learned human languages and grasped human motivations? In "Servants of the Queen" we meet and hear the talk of Indian Army work beasts and fighting beasts assembled in the spring of 1885 to impress Abdur Rahman, visiting Amir of Afghanistan, an event personally witnessed and reported by young journalist Kipling. The tale begins: "It had been raining heavily for one whole month -- raining on a camp of thirty thousand men and thousands of camels, elephants, horses, bullocks, and mules all gathered together at a place called Rawal Pindi, to be reviewed by the VIceroy of India." *** Kipling, fortunately for us readers, "knew enough of beast-language -- not wild-beast language, of course, from the natives to know what he (a panicked camel frightened by a bad dream) was saying." We learn how each class of army animal sized up things, how well they had been trained in their various specialties (e.g., mules to haul mountain howitzers up the sides of mountains, cavalry horses to hold formations for their riders, etc.) and what they absorbed from the men their masters. A young mule asked the other beasts why they had to fight at all. "'Because we're told to,'" said the troop-horse with a snort of contempt." "'Orders,'" said an older mule. "'Hukm hai (It is an order),' said the camel with a gurgle." And the elephant and the bullock agreed. But who gives the orders? The man who walks at your head or who rides you! But who gives them orders, asked the young mule? The others agreed that the youngster wanted to know far too much. *** And so it goes in or near world-wide jungles where men and intelligent beasts live not too far apart or, as in the Indian Army, live in symbiosis. Great yarns. Open THE JUNGLE BOOKS at random and judge for yourself! -OOO-
Guest More than 1 year ago
The story the Jungle Book is a true timeless classic. The story of Mogli a young orphan who is trying to surrvive in the jungle after being orphaned has a wide variety of emotiones. Mogli a young child is ophaned after his parents are killed by a tiger, only he manages to survive. Mogli is befriended by Baheer a wise old panter and Baloo a lazy bear. Between the the two animals they try to teach Mojli of the dangers of the forest and try to help him get to the nearest man villag. On their Odessey the three encounter many dangers. A group of luticris orangatans who want Mogli to protect them from danger, Kaa a boa constricter who wants to make Mojli lunch, and Shere Khan who wants to kill Mojli before Mojli seakes revenge for the slaughter of his parents. The Intense climax comes in a final show down between Shere Khan and Baheer, the fight leaves you on the edge of your seat and you wonder Will Mogli make out of the jungle alive, or parish such as his parents. The Jungle Book supports all the content that it takes to make a classic, and I would highly suggest, Rutyard Kippling made a true master piece.
James Woodnorth More than 1 year ago
Nicely formatted tales with the wit and historical perspective associated in Kipling.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Jungle Book was a great book to read. I thought that it would be a children's book, but I found that it could also be a great book for anyone to read! I got sucked into right from chapter one. Mowgli, the main character, was found and raised by wolves. He then was taught the Laws of the Jungle by Bagheera, the black panther, and Baloo, the bear. All through the book they run into some sort of trouble, but always manage to get out. Like when the Bandar-Log, the apes, take him for hostage and take him clear across the jungle to the Cold Lairs which an intense battle takes place. I would recommend this book to not only younger people, but to everyone. It is action-packed and it totally stole my attention and grabbed my heart at the end when Mowgli's enemy, Shere Kan, was taken over by him. This book has some flaws like the animals from the jungle don't really match where it takes place. I would give it four stars. I still think it is a good book, and I would recommend everyone that reads this review to read this book!
Ashlyn Comiskey More than 1 year ago
The edditing was terrible.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book as a child and now I have introduced my child to it. It seems that everyone who reads this book simply loves it and the original movie from 1942 is a great representation of this as well.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
People dont like the book cause theyve seen the disney movie first and expect the book to be the same. If one read the book before seeing the movie they might like the book more than the movie!
MysteryChristieluv More than 1 year ago
Good read for my young lad. He really enjoyed it and there were no spelling mistakes as previously been written.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a book that you can read again and again. My favorite is the story of Rikki Tikki Tavi.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is a good book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Are we sharing life stories?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a good book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago