Keep Your Ear on the Ball

Keep Your Ear on the Ball

Paperback

$16.95
View All Available Formats & Editions

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Eligible for FREE SHIPPING

Overview

Keep Your Ear on the Ball by Genevieve Petrillo, Lea Lyon

Everybody wants to help Davey. "Let me open that." "Do you want to hold my hand?" Davey has one answer for all, "Thanks, but no thanks."

Davey is blind--and he is perfectly capable of doing everything on his own. His well- meaning classmates stop offering help when they see how able Davey is. They respect his self-reliance--until he tries to play kickball. After several missed kicks and a trampled base keeper, no one wants Davey on his team.

Working together, the children figure out a way to offer help that respects Davey's unique abilities and his desire for freedom. In this seamless tale, based on a true story, the children realize that interdependence can be just as important and rewarding as independence.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780884482963
Publisher: Tilbury House Publishers
Publication date: 08/28/2007
Pages: 32
Product dimensions: 9.10(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile: NC650L (what's this?)
Age Range: 4 - 8 Years

About the Author

Genevieve Petrillo has been teaching elementary students at School Ten in Belleville, New Jersey, for thirty-four years. David DeNotaris was in her classroom many years ago, and Keep Your Ear on the Ball is a true story.

Lea Lyon is an illustrator who lives in Richmond, California. She has also illustrated Say Something and Playing War for Tilbury House.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Keep Your Ear on the Ball 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a future early childhood special education teacher, I found this book within my search for quality books about children with disabilities. During my search I found many books that potrayed those with disabilities either in a negative, "unable" sort of way, or books that portrayed them as a "superhero", which would suggest that a child with a disability needs a superpower to "make up for" their disability - which, of course, is not true. I also came across several very good books that portrayed children with disabilities in a positive way that focused on their abilities, rather than the disability. This book was one of them. This book did a great job of showing how Davey accomplishes things and showed that children with disabilities are fully capable of doing many things that children without disabilities can - they just learn how to do those things in different ways sometimes. I highly recommend this book to all educators and parents! It is a book I think all children should read!
EECBookReview More than 1 year ago
Keep Your Ear on the Ball by Genevieve Patrillo The book “Keep Your Ear on the Ball” is an inspirational story about a boy named Davey who is blind. When Davey comes to class he looks just like any other student, when the other students realize that he is blind they offer Davey help in his daily activities. Davey kindly responds “No, thank you.” whenever a student tries to offer him assistance. The students soon realize that Davey is very capable of taking care of himself and that he does not need assistance to do many of the things they thought were impossible for people with blindness. Davey can do all the things the students can do until everyone goes to play kickball. When playing kickball Davey has a hard time kicking the ball since he cannot see the ball. The students devise a method to remain quiet when Davey is kicking so he can hear the ball and kick it. I enjoyed this book because it breaks some of the stereotypes people may have about people with a disability. In the beginning the students thought that Davey was a victim and that he would constantly need their assistance to be normal in the class. The students soon found out that Davey could do many things on his own and that he would not be dependent on them to do daily tasks. This book shows that people with disabilities should not be judged instantly, that they are strong and that they can potentially do anything that a person without disabilities can do. I would use this book in the classroom to show students that people with disabilities are not helpless. People with a disability like blindness can overcome any obstacle that a person without blindness can overcome. This book is based on a true story which could further inspire my classroom to not judge someone with a disability and to realize that a disability does not need to hold a person back.
HomeSchoolBookReview More than 1 year ago
Do you know someone who is blind? A boy named Peter narrates the story of how Davey came into his class. Davey is blind. At first, all of his classmates want to help him, but he feels that he is perfectly capable of doing everything on his own, so he says, "Thanks, but no thanks," over and over again. As a result, his well-meaning friends stop offering help, until he tries to play kickball. He misses kicks and tramples a first baseman, so no one wants Davey on his or her team any more. Will the students be able to find a way to help Davey that respects his unique abilities and his desire for freedom? And will Davey learn that interdependence can be just as important and rewarding as independence? Author Genevieve Petrillo taught school for 34 years in Belleville, NJ. Keep Your Ear on the Ball, which won a Moonbeam Children's Book Award, is based upon her experiences with a blind student named David DeNotaris. Concerning those who are blind or have some kind of similar difficulty, there is a fine line when it comes to offering them help when there is an occasion which calls for it and respecting their need for self-reliance. This book, with illustrations by Lea Lyon, is an excellent resource to assist children, and adults as well, in being sensitive to these kinds of situations. Teachers and parents are invited to visit publisher Tilbury House's website for activities, games, discussion points, and further activities related to the book and its subject. I believe that young people will benefit from reading stories where blind, deaf, and other special needs children are portrayed in real-life circumstances.
Heart2Heart More than 1 year ago
Everybody wants to help Davey. "Let me open that." "Do you want to hold my hand?" Davey has one answer for all, "Thanks, but no thanks." Davey is blind - and he is perfectly capable of doing everything on his own. His well-meaning classmates stop offering help when they see how able Davey is. They respect his self reliance - until he tries to play kickball. After several missed kicks and a trampled first baseman, no one wants Davey on his or her team. But by working together, the children figure out a way to offer help that respects Davey's unique abilities and his desire for freedom. In this seamless tale, based on a true story, the children realize that interdependence can be just as important and rewarding as independence. (excerpt from inside flap). In the book, Keep Your Ear On The Ball by Genevieve Petrillo, the children learn how to deal with a child who is very independent and doesn't want his disability of being blind to allow him from doing things like the other kids. It's only through seeing things from Davey's perspective that the children learn how to help Davey play kickball by being team players and allowing Davey to be just like one of them. I received this book compliments of Tilbury House Publishers for my honest review and think that every child should read this book. It shows what can be done when the kids work together as a team instead of treating someone differently because of his disability. What a great gifts for any parent or grandparent as well as for schools and church youth groups as well. This is a perfect 5 out of 5 stars.