Killing Commendatore

Killing Commendatore

Hardcover

$27.00 $30.00 Save 10% Current price is $27, Original price is $30. You Save 10%. View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Monday, June 24

Overview

The epic new novel from the internationally acclaimed and best-selling author of 1Q84

In Killing Commendatore, a thirty-something portrait painter in Tokyo is abandoned by his wife and finds himself holed up in the mountain home of a famous artist, Tomohiko Amada. When he discovers a previously unseen painting in the attic, he unintentionally opens a circle of mysterious circumstances. To close it, he must complete a journey that involves a mysterious ringing bell, a two-foot-high physical manifestation of an Idea, a dapper businessman who lives across the valley, a precocious thirteen-year-old girl, a Nazi assassination attempt during World War II in Vienna, a pit in the woods behind the artist’s home, and an underworld haunted by Double Metaphors. A tour de force of love and loneliness, war and art—as well as a loving homage to The Great GatsbyKilling Commendatore is a stunning work of imagination from one of our greatest writers.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780525520047
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 10/09/2018
Pages: 704
Sales rank: 20,373
Product dimensions: 6.40(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.80(d)

About the Author

HARUKI MURAKAMI was born in Kyoto in 1949 and now lives near Tokyo. His work has been translated into more than fifty languages, and the most recent of his many international honors is the Hans Christian Andersen Literature Award, whose previous recipients include J. K. Rowling, Isabel Allende, and Salman Rushdie. 

harukimurakami.com

Hometown:

Tokyo, Japan

Date of Birth:

January 12, 1949

Place of Birth:

Kyoto, Japan

Education:

Waseda University, 1973

Read an Excerpt

Prologue
(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Killing Commendatore"
by .
Copyright © 2018 Haruki Murakami.
Excerpted by permission of Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Reading Group Guide

The questions, discussion topics, and other material that follow are intended to enhance your group’s conversation of Killing Commendatore, the epic new novel from the internationally acclaimed and best-selling author of 1Q84 and Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage.

1. As a painter, the narrator might be expected to have an increased sense of awareness and perceptivity. Yet more than once in the book it’s implied that he himself is more the subject of his portraits than the subjects are. Keeping in mind the fantastical element of the Commendatore coming to life, who would you say has the most control in this novel: the subject,, the artist, or the audience (the one who owns the work)? Contrast the agency of the Commendatore (an “Idea”) with the Man in the White Subaru Forester and Mariye (whose painting goes unfinished).

2. Discuss the role of art in the novel—not just painting but also music, such as opera, jazz, and Bruce Springsteen. Consider what the Commendatore says of Thelonius Monk: “What is important is not creating something out of nothing. What my friends need to do is discover the right thing from what is already there” (242). What does painting Mariye help each of them discover about something “already there”?

3. The narrator admits that he “prioritized the ego of the artist—myself—over you, the subject” in his painting of Menshiki (200). To his surprise, Menshiki still loves the painting. What does this tell you about Menshiki’s self-awareness and interdependence on others? How do his behaviors support this idea?

4. Menshiki’s choice to live across the water from his daughter alludes to The Great Gatsby—although this relationship is familial rather than romantic love. If you’ve read The Great Gatsby, in what other ways is that novel echoed in Killing Commendatore? In what ways are the two books similar and different?

5. Komi’s death had a profound impact on the narrator. How has losing her shaped him as a person? What is Komi’s role in the novel? What are some of the connections between Komi and the other women in the narrator’s life—Yuzu, Mariye, his girlfriend, and Muro? What does each of them possess that attracts him to them, including any artistic appeal? What is suggested by the way he responds to losing (or almost losing) them?

6. Discuss Masahiko’s revelation that people’s faces—and perhaps personalities—are not symmetrical. How does this inform the way that portraits are made in the book and the role of Long Face?

7. What is Tomohiko Amada’s role in the novel? Why is the narrator so determined to learn about Amada’s secret past? What does he discover?

8. What other kinds of asymmetries appear in the novel? Consider the juxtaposition of real and fantastical elements in addition to (mis)matches in people, time, and place.

9. Consider the role of obsession in the book. Which characters are more readily drawn into obsessive states of mind? What do they obsess about? How do they act on these feelings? For example, compare the narrator’s obsession with the pit in the woods (and painting it) with Menshiki’s obsession with Mariye.

10. Why does the narrator need to stab the Commendatore? Is their relationship just an expression of the notion that art and life reflect each other, or is it something more complicated? What kind of agency does he gain from doing so?

11. Consider the narrator’s journey along the Path of Metaphor. What does he experience along the way? Why does he embark on this quest and how does it change him?

12. The scene describing Mariye’s hiding in Menhiki’s house hands over some of the storytelling agency to her—the only time the narrator, and his mind, isn’t fully in control of the story. What does this slip into Mariye’s perspective indicate about her relationship with the narrator? Consider how closely he relates her to his younger sister and the need to protect her even from Menshiki himself.

13. Is the novel a love story? How might it meet the traditional definition of “love story,” and how does it complicate the notion of love?

14. Why does the narrator get back together with his wife? Do you believe that he could really be Muro’s father? Why or why not?

15. How does the narrator come to realize the boundaries of his own knowledge vis-à-vis Mariye’s portrait and his wife’s child? In his interpretation, is not knowing a fault or a benefit?

16. Describe the nature of reality in this novel. Where do the boundaries fall between dream and waking states, conscious and unconscious actions, and truth versus fantasy? Did the time you spent in the world of this book have an impact on your worldview once you finished?

17. Have you read any other books by Murakami? How were they similar to this novel? How were they different? Are there common themes that tie them together?

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Killing Commendatore: A novel 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
TiBookChatter More than 1 year ago
In my opinion, this is one of his most linear works and yet it possesses all of the key elements that Murakami fans have come to expect from his work. I spent a lot of time reading this one. Not because it was long and dense, but because each and every sentence begged to be read again. Much of it was beautifully written, but some of it was puzzling which is why I love Murakami so much. He takes an idea and just goes with it. In this story, an artist, recently separated from his wife, heads to a remote, hilltop home to do what he does best, paint. But in this house he finds a painting that basically, changes his life. The painting titled, Killing Commendatore, is a violent depiction of what is basically an assassination. An “idea” takes the shape of a very small man. There is a deep pit in the forest which will remind readers of The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle. There’s a young girl, a faceless guy, a menacing man who drives a Subaru, an impressionable aunt, and a very mysterious man who lives in a white mansion across the way. If you ever felt intimidated by Murakami in the past, this is the book for you. I think there is a lot to relate to in this one. The overall theme of loneliness, isolation, what it means to be married and loved and generally, what can be found at the core of each human being and how that can shift depending on the circumstances. I can see Murakami winning an award for this one. It seems to embody everything he’s ever written and yet remain so unique. I highly recommend it.
Anonymous 25 days ago
Fantastic! You get immersed into Murakami‘s world.
3no7 9 months ago
“Killing Commendatore” by Haruki Murakami with translation by Ted Goossen grabs readers starting with the cover – an eyeball looking straight out. “Killing Commendatore” opens with a faceless man who wants a portrait painted. This sets the stage for the tale of this strange but somehow normal painter. The narrator talks directly to the reader reporting his history and hinting at things that are far from normal. A word of caution for some readers; there is sexual content. “That may be the reason why, when I think back on that time (as you guessed, these events took place some years ago), the importance, perspective, and connections between events sometimes fluctuate … Still, here I want to do my utmost, as far as I can, to set down a systematic, logical account… I want to cling tightly to the hypothetical yardstick I’ve managed to fashion.” Vivid descriptions pull readers into a setting that is itself a character, distinct and expressly described. “Low patches of clouds hung over the surrounding mountains. When the wind blew, these cloud fragments, like some wandering spirits from the past, drifted uncertainly along the surface of the mountains, as if in search of lost memories. The pure white rain, like fine snow, silently swirled around on the wind. Since the wind rarely let up, I could even get by in the summer without air conditioning.” The narrator talks to others, he talks to himself, and talks to readers who get to know him well throughout his narrative. He shares his thoughts, intimate fears, and expectations. He presents the events as straightforward and concise, but behind it all, there hangs an air of suspicion and disbelief. Readers want to believe him, and yet are anxious as he hints of what is to come (“I’ll get into that later on.”) The story of his life continues in what he describes as a series of dominoes falling, one after the other, tumbling, crashing, one pushed by one preceding. Little events cause his world to collapse around him, and he shares every detail with readers. He continues day-by-day on a mostly linear timeline, some days uneventful, some troubling, and some frightening. He presents events in a calm, measured manner, but many events are far from calm and measured. Readers are left to speculate about his veracity and assessment of events. Murakami paints with words as the unnamed painter uses paint. “Maybe I was just imagining things. Maybe it was my own voice I was hearing, a voice welling up from my unconscious. But what I’d heard sounded odd. Not an easy thing to do, now, is it? Even unconsciously, I wouldn’t talk to myself like that.” Readers must evaluate the events, the relationships, the mysteries, and the result. “Killing Commendatore” is a long trip and a very long book, but one that pulls readers along with fantasy, and intrigue. In the end, there is an idea, a metaphor, and perhaps a question.
LeslieK More than 1 year ago
This was my favorite of his books, and that says a lot. I understand that many people don't "get" him, or like his style, but I think many of "those" would like this one. As stated above, it is much more linear, for those who have trouble following his story line, and it is still written in his beautiful use of language. Also, as the above reviewer stated, I read it very slowly because I loved it so much, and was in no hurry to finish. I hope this review will encourage some of you to give him another try.