The King of Attolia (The Queen's Thief Series #3)

The King of Attolia (The Queen's Thief Series #3)

by Megan Whalen Turner
4.7 114

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Overview

The King of Attolia (The Queen's Thief Series #3) by Megan Whalen Turner

By scheming and theft, the Thief of Eddis has become King of Attolia. Eugenides wanted the queen, not the crown, but he finds himself trapped in a web of his own making. Attolia's barons seethe with resentment, the Mede emperor is returning to the attack, and the king is surrounded by the subtle and dangerous intrigue of the Attolian court.

When a naive young guard expresses his contempt for the king in no uncertain terms, he is dragged by Eugenides into the center of the political maelstrom. Like the king, he cannot escape the difficulties he makes for himself. Poor Costis knows he is the victim of the king's caprice, but he discovers a reluctant sympathy for Eugenides as he watches the newly crowned king struggle against his fate.

Fans of the Newbery Honor Book The Thief and The Queen of Attolia will recognize Megan Whalen Turner's signature plot twists and turns in the third exquisitely crafted tale about Eugenides.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780060835774
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 01/24/2006
Series: Queen's Thief Series , #3
Pages: 400
Sales rank: 480,792
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 1.25(d)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author

Megan Whalen Turner is the bestselling and award-winning author of stand-alone novels set in the world of the Queen’s Thief. She has been awarded a Newbery Honor and a Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Young Adult Literature. She has won the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Children’s Literature and was a finalist for the Andre Norton Award. She worked as a bookseller for seven years before she started writing. Her first book was a collection of short stories called Instead of Three Wishes. Megan Whalen Turner lives in Shaker Heights, Ohio.

Read an Excerpt

The King of Attolia


By Megan Turner

HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2006 Megan Turner
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0060835788

Chapter One

Costis sat in his room. On the table in front of him was a piece of paper meant to hold a report on the squad of men he directed. He'd scratched out the first few lines of the report and written underneath the beginnings of a letter to his father. It began, "Sir, I must explain my actions," and then stopped. Costis couldn't explain his actions. He rubbed his face with his hands and tried again to compose his anguished thoughts into cold words and orderly sentences. He looked over the mess in his quarters. His small trunk of clothes was tipped out onto the floor. The tray that had sat in the top of it to hold his sleeve links and buttons and pins was thrown down by the bed. The links, the spare buttons, and the small image of his god were scattered everywhere. His books were gone. He'd had three. So, he assumed, was his wallet with what money he kept in his room. That was a pity. He would have given the money to his friend Aristogiton. His sword was gone from its rack on the wall. He would have given that to Aris as well. The two soldiers who'd brought him back from the training ground, almost dragging him along by their grip at his elbows, had taken every sharp thing out of the room. They were veterans, who'd served in the Guard for most of their lives. They'd searched his small trunk and dragged the thin mattress, as well as the blanket, off the narrow bed frame. One had pulled down Costis's sword and swept up his knife from the windowsill while the other had collected his papers, crumpling them together in his fist. Without looking at him again, they'd gone. Costis had turned the stool upright on its three legs. They had left his cloak pins, his plain everyday one and his fancy one with the amber bead. He had been a little surprised. His good pin was fibula-shaped with a shaft four inches long and as thick as a cornstalk. It would be as effective as a sword, if Costis chose to use it. Even the smaller pin would do; two inches in the right place was all it took. As Costis had considered, without any real motivation, the possibilities of the cloak pins, the curtain across his doorway had swept back and one of the soldiers had returned to kick his feet briskly through the detritus on the floor, quickly locating the cloak pins. After scooping them up, he had checked the floor again to see if there were more. He had seen the sandal straps and taken those. He'd looked Costis over once and shaken his head in contempt as he left. Costis looked back at the letter in front of him. It was almost the only paper they'd left him. He shouldn't waste it, but he didn't know how he could explain his actions to his father when he couldn't explain them to himself. He'd broken a sacred oath, had destroyed his career, his life, and perhaps his family in one moment. It was unnatural to look back at events and be unable to believe that what you remembered could actually have happened. It was afternoon. He'd made no progress on his letter since morning, when the sun had been slanting into the narrow window and filling the small room with light. The sun had climbed over the roof of the barracks and the room was grown dim, lit only indirectly by the sunlight falling into the narrow courtyard between barracks. Costis was waiting for the queen. She had left the palace for the first time since her marriage and had gone hunting. She was to eat at midday at one of the lodges and return sometime in the afternoon. Costis got up from his stool and paced for the hundredth, the thousandth time across the room. He would be sentenced when she returned, almost certainly to death. Even worse than death would come if she thought that he had acted as part of a conspiracy or that even one member of his family had known of his actions in advance. If that happened, his family would have to leave the farm outside Pomea in the Gede Valley. Every single one of them, not just his father and his sister, but uncles, aunts, and cousins. Their property would be forfeit to the crown and they would be no longer members of the landowning class, but would be okloi -- merchants if they were lucky, beggars if they were not. Of course, even he had had no foreknowledge of what was going to happen. He would never have guessed that he could so compound calamity with disaster, but the truth hardly mattered now. Costis thought of the papers they had taken away and tried to remember exactly what was in them that could be mistaken for plans of treason. The Secretary of the Archives could see treason in a single word. One hint of a plan and Costis would be put to torture instead of hanging in the morning. He knew that when torture began, Truth, which had mattered very little to begin with, soon mattered not at all. He stepped to the window and looked out at the shadows falling on the barracks across from him. The midafternoon trumpets would be sounding soon and the watches would be changing. He was supposed to be on the palace walls. Behind him he heard the curtain rings sliding on the rod across his doorway. He turned to face the men who would take him to the palace. There were no guards. Standing alone in the doorway was the king. The ruler, anointed by priests and priestesses, of all the lands of Attolia, the official father of the people, the lord of the barons who'd one by one sworn him their oaths of obedience, the undisputed, uncontested, and absolute sovereign of the land. The swollen discoloration by his mouth closely matched the elaborate purple embroidery on his collar.

Continues...

Excerpted from The King of Attolia by Megan Turner Copyright © 2006 by Megan Turner. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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The King of Attolia (The Queen's Thief Series #3) 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 114 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The books just keep getting better!!! I loved it!!!
Aditi-ATWAMB More than 1 year ago
Short and Sweet: The King of Attolia defied all conventional logic that a fantasy series follows and managed to delight me and keep me hooked throughout this political masterpiece. Let’s go more into detail: It honestly took me a while to pick up The King Of Attolia after I put down book two, The Queen of Attolia, for reasons unknown to even me. I really liked QoA in comparison to book one, The Thief, but it still took me a long time to get into the mood for this one. I'd heard a lot of people say that The King of Attolia was BY FAR the best book in the series so far and so my expectations were high. It didn't disappoint, but I will admit that the beginning of this book threw me a little bit. If you've been following my reviews of The Thief and The Queen of Attolia, you'll know that it took me a while to get used to Eugenides and his narration but the minute I had, we got the book from another's (new) character's point of view. While books one and two were all about travelling, this one was set purely in the palace with Gen's transition to King being told from the point of view of a Palace Guard. Gen, once again, faces tremendous character growth but from the eyes of a third party. At first, Gen seems like a thoroughly disinterested King - sleeping at meetings, wears ridiculous clothes and takes none of his duties seriously, letting his wife, the Queen rule as she always has. From Costis' POV (the guard) we see how his view of Gen changes from an arrogant King to a boy who misses his home and everything he knew. One thing I should mention is the GORGEOUS construction of Attolia in this book.In The Thief, we only saw it from it's enemy kingdom's perspective but in this book, we were properly introduced to the customs, religious practices and superstitions of a beautiful kingdom. As always with this series, Megan Whalen Turner managed to get the politics and ruling a kingdom SPOT ON. There were twists, turns, betrayals, assassination attempts and so high paced that I LOVED IT. A series definitely worth diving into (you can read them all as stand-alones or together) purely for the fact that you will NOT be able to predict what happens next. The Queen's Thief series defies all conventional fantasy rules and paves its own way to glory. Highly recommended.
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I really liked all four books from this series, and liked them about equally. They are fairly short books, and on occasion may not seem to fully develop when some of the twists occur, but they are fun, thrilling, and imaginative!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You know each book in this series was a masterpice, so brilliantly written they kept you enged evey step of the way. There was just the perfect amout of every element I love in a book and it was easy to read. I love Gen and even Irene who proves herself in this book as worthy of him. I find their little love story charming and not overdone. I love the idea of two enimies falling in love and having such a strange but meaningful relationship. Not to worry to those who are in it for the action and intrigue there is plenty of it written to perfection. If only they would let me give it ten stars.
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New characters come into play. Just as good as the first two books in the series i hope the author can crank out another in the next year
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Defentle my favret book
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The King of Attolia is another great installment in the series. The story is told mostly from a young Attolian soldier's point of view, Costis, who is assigned to the new king. He despises Eugenides, but what can he do? However, as Costis spends more time with Eugenides, he finds that the new king is quite intelligent, and there may be more to him than meets the eye. Eugenides is the new King of Attolia, and the people don't like him, at all. They think he's lazy, naive, unintelligent, and not fit to be king. But Eugenides doesn't care. He wanted their queen, not the crown. But eventually he starts to accept the responsibilities of being king and wins the loyalty of some Attolians. In this book we also get to see a more intimate relationship between Eugenides and the queen, which was very sweet. I really missed Eugenides in this book. He was in the book quite a bit, but I missed reading from his point of view. It was awesome seeing him stand up to the Attolians and seeing them change their views about him. NEVER underestimate Eugenides! Costis is very honest and loyal and I'm glad he got stuck watching Eugenides, though I kind of felt sorry for him. But he was one of the first few to see the other side of Eugenides, the clever, capable, and vulnerable side. I loved the third installment in the series. The Queen of Attolia is still my favorite, but this one comes close
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I've read this many times, whole series actually. One may ask why, but all I can tell you is that this is an amazing book of Kings and Queens, pain and loyalty. Once you pick up the book, you cannot put it down.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Highly recommended. You really have to pay attention while reading this one.
MissPrint More than 1 year ago
It is not easy to become the king of a country already fond of its queen, especially for a foreigner who kidnapped that queen and may or may not have forced her hand in that matter of their marriage. How can any man truly become a king when no one can see him as a sovereign? Not that it matters. With such tenuous foundations, sovereignty is not enough to ensure loyalty anyway. Being the Thief of Eddis was always enough for Eugenides. He didn't want to become King of Attolia. He didn't want the crown at all. He wanted the queen. Even more wondrous, Attolia wanted him. But one cannot marry a queen without becoming a king. The union requires a careful dance of shadows and unsubstance, but under it all, there is still a marriage of two people. But there is also more. An unlikely pair and, for Gen at least, unlikely monarchs, their marriage will not be an easy one. Each move will require careful calculation. Especially when a rash young guard is dragged into the middle of the kingdom's political machinations. Much like Gen himself, Costis wants nothing to do with the royal court or Eugenides' efforts to avoid all royal responsibility. And yet the more time he spends with the young king the more Costis understands all the Gen has lost in his pursuit of the throne--and what made the sacrifice worthwhile. Together these unlikely allies might even teach the Attolian court a thing or two about what it takes to be a true king in The King of Attolia (2006) by Megan Whalen Turner. The King of Attolia is the sequel to Turner's Newbery honor book The Thief which first introduced readers to Eugenides and his world and its followup The Queen of Attolia. Readers of Turner's earlier books will quickly recognize references to characters from other volumes and past events (others might be well advised to re-read the earlier titles to get a better sense of the big picture of the series). Written with shifting viewpoints, readers learn about Gen's changed circumstances through Costis' eyes. In this way, it is easy to see how little the country thinks of their new king and also, thanks to moments from Gen and Attolia's perspectives, how greatly they underestimate his cunning and his ingenuity. As much a coming of age story as the story of a man learning to be king, The King of Attolia is another fine installment about the inimitable Thief of Eddis. Somewhat lighter on action and war-making than the first two books in the series, this one makes up for it by providing more insight into the ways of Attolia and her relationship with Gen. Richly told and expertly written, this story lays fine groundwork for the next installment in Turner's wonderful series A Conspiracy of Kings. Possible Pairings: Fire by Kristin Cashore, Fire and Hemlock by Diana Wynne Jones, Finnikin of the Rock by Melina Marchetta, Sabriel by Garth Nix
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