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Knock, Knock
     

Knock, Knock

by Sophie Blackall (Illustrator), Henry Cole (Illustrator), Tomie dePaola (Illustrator), Saxton Freymann (Illustrator), Brett Helquist (Illustrator)
 

The knock-knock joke: a kid classic. So many funny, punny punchlines. It was just screaming for its own book. To do this classic joke justice, we decided to gather fourteen of the best-known and most talented children's book artists to illustrate their favorite punchlines. The results are wacky, zany, and absolutely hilarious.

If you knock on Tomie dePaola's

Overview

The knock-knock joke: a kid classic. So many funny, punny punchlines. It was just screaming for its own book. To do this classic joke justice, we decided to gather fourteen of the best-known and most talented children's book artists to illustrate their favorite punchlines. The results are wacky, zany, and absolutely hilarious.

If you knock on Tomie dePaola's door, beware! Is that a girl or a gorilla? Who's knocking at Saxton Freymann's door? Just a couple of talking lettuces. Talking lettuces?! One impatient cow can hardly wait to get through Laurie Keller's door, and David Small has a surprise waiting for his intruding vampire.

In this collection, you'll recognize some of your favorite jokes and be surprised by new ones. But one thing is certain: Each time there's a knock, you'll want to answer the door!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Fourteen prominent picture book creators try their hands at knock-knocks in this follow-up to Why Did the Chicken Cross the Road?Each contributor gets the front and back of a page for the "Knock, knock!/ Who's there?" set-up and punch line. Tomie dePaola pictures a tropical-themed home with "Gorilla" tapping at the door. At the call of "Gorilla who?" an ape sweeps in to hug his hirsute sweetheart: "Gorill-a' my dreams, I love you!" In a contemporary vein, veggie photographer Saxton Freymann takes the "Lettuce/ Lettuce who?" dialogue at face value. With their black-eyed pea eyeballs, stalk noses and leafy mouths, two heads of greenery demand, "Lettuce in!" Dan Yaccarino pictures an alien astronaut asking, "Peeka who?" and gingerly opening a space-hatch to a cheerful orange monster with 17 peepers ("Peek-a-boo, my eyes see you!"); in Brett Helquist's nursery send-up, two placid pigs get a visit from a big bad wolf named Ima ("Ima gonna huff, Ima gonna puff . . . "). Of his peers, Henry Cole achieves perhaps the best nonsense spirit, drawing out the "Esther who?/ Esther Bunny!" joke for six go-rounds and a dozen panels. Chris Raschka pays homage to Maurice Sendak ("Verdi who?/ Verdi Vild Tings Are!"); and Boris Kulikov answers "Amos who?" with a giant, surreally creepy insect and the reply "A mosquito bit me!" Perhaps inevitably, the book offers a decidedly mixed bag; however, pint-size comics-for whom no knock-knock joke is ever too stale-will see gems where adults find the groaners. Ages 4-up. (Sept.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Children's Literature
Following the success of the collection Why Did the Chicken Cross the Road? fourteen picture book artists contribute their verbal and visual answers to the “Who’s there?” question. Sometimes the question is on the right-hand page which must be turned for the answer, like Boris Kulikov’s answer to “Amos who?” “A mosquito bit me!” Or it could be like David Small’s question and answer on one page: “Ivan who?” “Ivan to drink your blood,” says the vampire. Turning the page, we see the young girl at the door neatly disposing of the threat. This collection offers a fine display of many of the media and design layouts exploited by picture books. From Freemann’s photographs of heads of lettuce with bean eyes to the brash cartoons by Reynolds to Muth’s sensitive naturalistic watercolors, we find humor in the word play, outlandish concepts, and visual interpretations. The varied typography adds to the fun. On the final pages, each illustrator answers the question, “Who do these artists want knocking at their doors?” Along with each answer are a self-portrait and names of a few of their books. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803731523
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
09/20/2007
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
10.25(w) x 10.25(h) x 0.35(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Sophie Blackall is a Brooklyn based Australian artist. She has illustrated over twenty books for children, including Ruby's Wish (Chronicle Books, 2003) which won the Ezra Jack Keats Award, Meet Wild Boars (Henry Holt, 2005) which won a BCCB Blue Ribbon Picture Book Award and the Founders Award from the Society of Illustrators, Big Red Lollipop (Viking, 2010) which was a New York Times Top Ten Picture Book for 2010, and the ongoing Ivy and Bean series (Chronicle Books), which has over a million copies in print.
Blackall has collaborated with many notable authors, including Aldous Huxley, Judith Viorst, Jane Yolen and Meg Rosoff.
Her editorial illustrations have appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, Time, Gourmet, Food & Wine, Town & Country and many others.

Tomie dePaola was born in Meriden, Connecticut, in 1934 to a family of Irish and Italian background. By the time he could hold a pencil, he knew what his life's work would be. His determination to create books for children led to a BFA from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, and an MFA from the California College of Arts & Crafts in Oakland, California.

Tomie lives in an interesting house in New Hampshire with his four dogs. His studio is in a large renovated 200-year-old barn.

Judith Byron Schachner has been illustrating and writing children's books since 1992 and has given numerous presentations in schools and libraries. Her workshops are designed to be warm and personal with a special regard for the less than stellar student.

David Small grew up in Detroit, studied Art and English at Wayne State University and completed his graduate studies in art at Yale. He went on to teach drawing and printmaking at the college level for fourteen years, during which time his first book Eulalie and The Hopping Head was published. David no longer teaches but has continued illustrating.

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