L.A. Confidential (L.A. Quartet #3)

L.A. Confidential (L.A. Quartet #3)

by James Ellroy

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Overview

L.A. Confidential is epic "noir", a crime novel of astonishing detail and scope written by the bestselling author of The Black Dahlia. A horrific mass murder invades the lives of victims and victimizers on both sides of the law. And three lawmen are caught in a deadly spiral, a nightmare that tests loyalty and courage, and offers no mercy, grants no survivors.

(124,000 words)

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781455528745
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
Publication date: 01/01/2013
Series: L.A. Quartet Series , #3
Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 496
Sales rank: 80,342
File size: 677 KB

About the Author


James Ellroy was born in Los Angeles in 1948. He is the author of the acclaimed L.A. Qurtet - The Black Dahlia, The Big Nowhere, LA Confidential and White Jazz, as well as the Underworld USA trilogy: American Tabloid, The Cold Six Thousand and Blood's a Rover. He is the author of one work of non-fiction, The Hilliker Curse: My Pursuit of Women. Ellroy lives in Los Angeles.

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L.A. Confidential (L.A. Quartet #3) 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 28 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The characters are three-dimensional and the engaging plot is gritty and complex. Ellroy's masterpiece of crime and corruption in 1950s L.A. is a must for crime fiction fans.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I breezed through this book in a blur of a weekend, simply unable to put it down. Ellroy's words fly off the page and come at you like bullets. His noir, hard-as-nails style is hynotic. The plot is intricate, the characters well drawn, and the ending is satisfying. He does not insult the reader by assuming he or she cannot follow along labyrinth-like plotting. If you want light reading, forget it. But if you like twisting, turning mysteries and pulse-pounding suspense, BUY THIS BOOK!
Anonymous 3 months ago
los angeles noir at its best.
Anonymous 3 months ago
James Ellroy is just the best writer of dark , but believable stories. His characters grow and learn, but remain true to their core selves.
randoymwords on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is set in 1950's L.A., but the book's theme applies to any environment where the pursuit of personal agenda becomes more important than the prompting event. We refer to this side of human nature as "politics", accepting certain behaviors as allowable under a competitive system, and the "50's" were a very competitive time. All in the name of human progress, of course.There are three interesting worlds here: the "underground" elements of ethnic neighborhoods, prostitutes and organized crime; the "hollywood" zone of illegal drugs and sexual deviance; the "big money boys" building the future dreaming of freeway systems and amusement parks. All three are shown to us by a particular officer, each with his own reason of operating within that world. Wendell White has a vendetta against wife-beaters and pimps, ends up becoming a bogeyman who follows orders and administers physical violence without question. Jack Vincennes is an advisor for a television show, trades info with gossip mags in return for headlines, and has a history of making drug busts in the jazz world to supply himself with speed. Ed Exely is the son of a major figure in construction AND policework, (including a personal connection to the building of the novel's version of Disneyland) and is concerned with attaining rank and crushing his enemies within the force.Of course, crime, particularly murder, does not stay within neighborhoods or classes. When a major crime occurs, each officer is working within their own competitive zones. Information is kept secret for different personal reasons, with the combined effect of allowing major injustices to occur while minor ones are quelled for the benefit of the media and promotions.This being a fiction, the right series of events occur to force these men to weigh the benefits of co-operation versus secrecy. Years of habitual hatred and self-protection have to give way to the pursuit of justice, and perhaps, letting go of the past that haunts them all.
jengel on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Great and I did the swanky hepcat language. Movie equally good for once!
whirled on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
You need only read a few pages of this hard-boiled classic to realise how much the hard edges were buffed on plot and characters for the (excellent) film version. Ellroy's book details an even more complicated web of intrigue, presenting Los Angeles law enforcement as a shady underworld built on dirty money, cover-ups and murder. Even 'squeaky clean' wunderkind Edmund Exley wades deep into the muck, his reputation made by an enormous lie the movie's screenwriters later spared him.With all its plot twists, unforeseen revelations and shifting allegiances, L.A. Confidential ticks along at a cracking pace; its short chapters make it even harder to put down. This was my first foray into Ellroy's minutely detailed world, and I already have more books on order. Recommended reading.
maneekuhi on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Liked the movie. Great cast. Book consistent with it for first 100 pages or so,then whoosh. Noir, very noir. 50-100 characters, all with a streak of evil. Mickey Cohen. Or worse. Lots of phrases. Some sentences. Lots of jumps. Multi theories of whodunit. Multi suspects. Movie - key character killed in kitchen with gun by a cop. Big surprise. Book, he's killed in a shoot-out at end of book. Johnny Stampanato. Why the train holdup? Got completely lost. Didn't care. Wanted it to end. Don't remember ending. Lots of bodies. Some real life characters. 500 pages. 3 other books in the quartet. Including Black Dahlia. Won't read more. Guy = Ed, Crowe = Bud.
rotheche on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I love this book. It's so complex, with intertwining plots and subplots, and intricate backstory, and more atmosphere than it knows what to do with.LA in the 50s, where the cops are often as corrupt as the criminals they're policing. Ed Exley is a straight arrow, living in the shadow of his father and older brother, and a deceitful past; Jack Vincennes is a 'star' cop, working on a television show, pulling down celebrity busts, but with a past he can't allow to be known; Bud White is a thug, the one called in when a confession needs to be beaten out of a suspect.I won't try and describe the plot(s), because a quick summary won't do them justice; suffice it to say that you have to pay attention to what's going on, or you'll be sitting there saying 'wha?' halfway through. The plot's great - but what really makes it is a) Ellroy's writing style, clipped and terse, and at the same time amazingly descriptive, and b) the characters.They're extraordinarily well-drawn, utterly believable; the fictional characters blend seamlessly with the historical figures - Johnny Stompanato, Mickey Cohen - and the historical events that Ellroy 'borrows' mix just as smoothly.Amazingly good reading.
sharv on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A thousand times more complex and amoral than the film of the same name. Not a bad movie, but an excellent novel.
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One of the best books in this genre that I have read in years. Plot twists up until the end. Main and bit players in the book are unforgettable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Nook version has some editing problems. e.g., "Calendar 1957" has sections that repeat four or more times. I HOPE that there's no missing text.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have to admit, this is the first James Ellroy book I've read - and don't know why I haven't read his books prior to this one. It took me a while to get used to his style of writing, but written in any other style just wouldn't have worked to get the feel of what's going through the detectives' heads (I mean, you could actually feel the adreneline going through Bud's head)...how they are playing out the crime scenes individually then coming together with their own theories.....the book moves so fast there were parts I had to re-read. Ellroy does not sugarcoat anything he puts before the reader...gritty, raw and intense and what we had before us were very flawed men and in the end, it all comes together. I will be reading more of Ellway, that's for sure.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Who's right and who's wrong? That's the question Ellroy begs readers to ask in LA Confidential. Is it Johnathan 'Jack' Vincenness, a vice cop who sells his soul one Hush-Hush punchline at a time? Wendell 'Bud' White with his moral crusade against women beaters? Or is it Edmund 'Ed' Exley, a rich kid trying to surpass his father in command and ambition? But justice is like the L.A. night Ellroy finely portrays - a dull gray with an occasional street light throwing light and shadow on both plot and its characters, who might be ugly, but not matter how hard you try, you can't stop yourself from riding along. (Blunt, hard prose takes a bit getting used to but fits the story well)