Laboratory Manual of Psychology: Volume Two of a Series of Text-Books Designed to Introduce the Student to the Methods and Principles of Scientific Psychology, Volume 2

Laboratory Manual of Psychology: Volume Two of a Series of Text-Books Designed to Introduce the Student to the Methods and Principles of Scientific Psychology, Volume 2

by Charles Hubbard Judd

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$20.75
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781141783212
Publisher: Creative Media Partners, LLC
Publication date: 02/13/2015
Pages: 142
Product dimensions: 7.44(w) x 9.69(h) x 0.30(d)

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and it also relieves the tendency to fatigue, which is a serious complication when it appears on the part of the person whose experience is being tested. For convenience in discussions and records, the person who conducts the objective side of the experiment should always be designated as the experimenter. The person whose experience is being examined is variously designated as observer, reactor, or subject. In the exercises of this course, a regular order of presentation will be followed. Under five general heads, the successive steps of preparation, experimentation, and elaboration of results will be outlined. First, brief introductory remarks will be given,, which will indicate to the student the general relations of the problems to be investigated. It is important that the student take up every investigation with a full knowledge of the meaning of the problem, otherwise his experimentation is likely to become a purely formal routine. Second, some description will be given of the method to be followed in working out the problem. In this part of the exercise little, if any, reference will be made to apparatus, although apparatus is often required. The omission of any descriptionof apparatus is due to the fact that the general method is capable of adaptation, in most cases, to a variety of mechanical accessories, and the mechanical details can very properly be left to be demonstrated at the beginning of the experiment, or they can even be left to the student's own ingenuity. Third, the exercise proper will conclude with certain questions which are intended to suggest to the student some of the lines along which he may utilize his results for psychological generalization, or forthe formulation of new problems. It is especially important in this connection that the stu...

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