Land of a Thousand Hills: My Life in Rwanda

Land of a Thousand Hills: My Life in Rwanda

by Rosamond Halsey Carr, Ann Howard Halsey
4.3 10

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Land of a Thousand Hills: My Life in Rwanda 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
WBWB More than 1 year ago
Rosamond's story, while genuine from her perspective lauds the government which planned and implemented the 1994 genocide against Tutsis. Her perspective is one of ignorance to the daily occurences around her.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Must read for any student of Africa, of social history, or of human nature. Beautifully rendered and heartbreaking.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While the author's style was a little disjointed for a linear thinker like me, the content and historical research is amazing. We hear about genocide, but to hear from an American in the midst of Rwanda's civil turmoil brought the story so close, made it so understandable. Very real. Rosamond Halsey Carr's truest bravery came clear when she returned to a broken country that she had come to love to help the innocent children who were victims of the war. This is an amazing testimony to the difference one person can make.
msscarlettt More than 1 year ago
LOVED this book. It was not that her writing was that fabulous as it wasn't. As a matter of fact the way she goes back and forth it made it a bit annoying; yet her life is such an exciting adventure that you lose track of the fact that she tends to tell it out of order. Ms Carr does manage to bring the landscape and the people of Rwanda alive which at the end of the day is what I was interested in. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in Africa, the history of Rwanda and it's people and or great stories about adventurous spirits!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just adored this book! I didn't want to put it down - I just loved it! The life of Rosamund Carr is extraordinary. I would recommend this book to anyone - it is a totally great read
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read Ms. Carr's book and it reads like a documentary. I have read that Rwanda is absolutely beautiful - one of the most beautiful countries in the world. For such a lovely country, it's history- like most of Africa -is drenched in blood. I studied the photos included in the book and one cannot help wondering what happened to some of the people during the genocide. What became of the young woman and the young Tutsi boys dancing? Did they survive? What happened in that country broke my heart.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had the good fortune of working on a photo project at Rosamond Carr's orphanage after reading her book. Having read a lot about Rwanda and having traveled extensively throughout the country, it is safe to say, Ms. Carr's perspective is completely unique and she is a gifted story teller. As far as an earlier review which speaks of her colonial attitudes, this misses the essence of Rosamond's character and life. The reader will find that one of the most joyous days in Rosamond's life was when Rwanda was granted independence and became a nation unto itself. Also, Rosamond did not come from money, nor did she accumulate financial wealth. Conversely, when colonial plantation owners and managers left the Congo and Rwanda, Rosamond stayed. In fact she lost everything in her house during and after the genocide, was evacuated, but chose to return to open an orphanage in the most dangerous part of the country - at the age of 80-something! I have witnessed the efforts of the Rwandan gov't's, the US gov'ts, and countless NGO's to help 'fix' Rwanda, which is sort of like watching cats chase their own tails. Rosamond simply brings all the love, discipline, and energy a mother has to bear for the children in her care. The reader should not mistake charm, grace, and the appreciation of beauty, for colonial attitudes. On the contrary, Rosamond treats Rwanda as her home judging the past, present, and future of Rwanda the way anyone who has lived in the same place their whole adult life would - with a very personal and heart-felt perspective.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had the good fortune of working on a photo project at Rosamond Carr's orphanage after reading her book. Having read a lot about Rwanda and having traveled extensively throughout the country, it is safe to say, Ms. Carr's perspective is completely unique and she is a gifted story teller. As far as an earlier review which speaks of her colonial attitudes, this misses the essence of Rosamond's character and life. The reader will find that one of the most joyous days in Rosamond's life was when Rwanda was granted independence and became a nation unto itself. Also, Rosamond did not come from money, nor did she accumulate financial wealth. Conversely, when colonial plantation owners and managers left the Congo and Rwanda, Rosamond stayed. In fact she lost everything in her house during and after the genocide, was evacuated, but chose to return to open an orphanage in the most dangerous part of the country - at the age of 80-something! I have witnessed the efforts of the Rwandan gov't's, the US gov'ts, and countless NGO's to help 'fix' Rwanda, which is sort of like watching cats chase their own tails. Rosamond simply brings all the love, discipline, and energy a mother has to bear for the children in her care. The reader should not mistake charm, grace, and the appreciation of beauty, for colonial attitudes. On the contrary, Rosamond treats Rwanda as her home judging the past, present, and future of Rwanda the way anyone who has lived in the same place their whole adult life would - with a very personal and heart-felt perspective.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thoroughly enjoyed this book! Although perhaps I'm biased seeing as how I lived about a mile down the road from Ms. Carr (Roz) in Rwanda for several years! *grin* I was relatively young when we lived in Rwanda so I never spent much time talking with her about 'grown-up things' and most of her tale was formerly unknown to me. I was somewhat disturbed by her 'colonial attitude' because the nine years I spent in Central Africa were in the missionary context (my parents were teachers at Mudende -- which she mentions in the book). But I believe that she was very well respected by everyone (Rwandese and European) despite her 'plantation owner' status. She was always very kind to us children and we liked to show up on her doorstep for treats! My family didn't arrive in Africa until the late 70s and things had certainly changed from when she arrived. All the same, by the end of her story she had very accurately depicted the Rwanda that I remember and she made me nostalgic for the land of my childhood. When she described the genocide I was once again saddened to read about the devestation that Rwanda endured. I'm sorry that I will never be able to return to the innocent 'home' from my youth...because it no longer exists (figuratively and literally).
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book following Barbara Kingsolver's 'The Poisonwood Bible'. 'The Poisonwood Bible' is a fictional story of a missionary family in the Congo area of Africa. It has a profoundly anti-American air running through it,and is written mostly through the eyes of the native African. 'A Land of a Thousand Hills' is a non-fictional account of Ms.Carr's life in that same area. She presents the viewpoint of the more wealthy foreign landowner. Reading the two books together gives a good perspective on the events surrounding the mid-twentieth century in that part of Africa. The book has a very flowing and desciptive style, making it a joy to read. On top of all that, it reflects Ms.Carr's monumental struggle to survive and perserve the beauty of the people and the land in Rwanda.