La's Orchestra Saves the World

La's Orchestra Saves the World

by Alexander McCall Smith
4.0 35

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La's Orchestra Saves the World 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 35 reviews.
Elijian_11120707 More than 1 year ago
I thoroughly enjoyed this book from start to finish! The author has a fantastic way of enticing you to want to read more and more. The layout of the book is what makes the story come together and the plot is one that any person from various generations can relate to. It is truly talent when a writer can combine a tale of journey(s), love, betrayal, adversity, friendship, desire, generational differences, and culture all in one story so fluently and seamlessly that when it all comes together in the end you find yourself longing for the story to continue. Bravo!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book very much, although it was very bitter-sweet. It had a bit of a slow start but picked up further on.
DoctorJS More than 1 year ago
La's Orchestra Saves the World is a lovely addition to Alexander McCall Smith's impressive list of wonderful books. Set in England during and after WWII, it describes the personal journeys of a set of interesting characters in the framework of a historic time about which all of us, especially Americans I would say, would do well to learn more. Read it. It's one that you'll want to keep.
SheilaDeeth More than 1 year ago
Large and small betrayals and the gift of love in war-torn Britain during WWII. London, Cambridge and Suffolk all play their part in this historical novel by Alexander McCall Smith. Set in the time around World War II, it builds a convincing picture of war-torn Britain where human kindness wars with the darkness of suspicion and fear. Real characters fill the village streets, farm the fields, and feed the airmen stationed nearby. But if foreigners are dropping bombs, can a Polish pilot with a German accent really be worthy of trust? Betrayed by her husband, Lavender—called La—has settled into the routine of a quiet life, comfortable enough, rich enough and insulated enough from what goes on around her. But the war intrudes and this new betrayal leads her to live again, signing on to volunteer, meeting strangers, and even, finally, starting an orchestra. Like the war, her orchestra won’t last long—just a temporary diversion she thinks. And, like the war, it lasts till the fighting’s done. Lawns turn to potato plots, neighbors to friends, and the Polish airman awakens La’s heart with his gentle formality. But when suspicions of wrong-doing grow, will honest truth turn into betrayal of love? La’s Orchestra Saves the World is a beautifully evocative novel of Britain at war, and of hearts warring with themselves. I can vouch for the truth of the countryside drawn by the author. My Mum can vouch for the honest depiction of the people. And readers will quickly be drawn into La’s world with its love and complications, delighting in her music and looking forward to her redemption. Disclosure: I borrowed this book from a generous friend.
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penandplow More than 1 year ago
This is a tender story of courage and love during World War II: love and loyalty for one's country; love, trust and dependence upon one's neighbors and local community; and of course, the heart's yearnings that are beyond our control whether in wartime or peace. The characters are true, full of quirks and actions that are completely believable. As in our own lives, there is a parallel between the personal and the world view; we have love, betrayal, hope.
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The story has a mysterious beginning that holds the reader's attention until the very end. One gets a sense of the English people and of their fortitude during the difficult times of WWII. It is a book that captures one's heart.
IdahobookwormDT More than 1 year ago
I love Alexander McCall Smith's "Number 1 Ladies' Detective Agency" series, so I thought I would give this book a try. While I didn't love this book, it was a worthwhile read. I learned about life during WWII in England. This book has sadness, but also warmth and human caring. I felt parts of it were a bit trite, but I enjoyed reading it and liked how it ended.
huckfinn37 More than 1 year ago
This book was okay. I liked the message of community involvement and that music can and does calm tensions. However, the book starts with a flashback so that the reader knows that La is dead. Also, Henry was too bitter for my taste. I have read better Alexander MCCall books
kariKB More than 1 year ago
Alexander McCall Smith's writing transports the reader to another time and place. It's a gentle reminder of the hardship endured during the war and the determined way the English people carried on with life and tried to make their lives better despite their circumstances. This is a quiet, gentle story. A very good read.
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Drann More than 1 year ago
McCall Smith has a gift for understanding the woman's psyche, as evidenced in his characters in the #1 Ladies' Detective Agency book series. Sadly, the central character of this book lacks the grit of Precious and Grace. While the "lady detectives" take matters into their own hands, La Stone waits for things to happen. Set in Suffolk during World War II, the young widow, La Stone, who is rich and bored, brings together an orchestra--most of the work done by others. She falls in love, but does nothing to assure that romance will follow. La should spend some time with Precious--her life would certainly improve.
afg85 More than 1 year ago
McCall Smith has a tremendous ability to translate the everyday into a story and commentary that spells out the underlying values and philosophy of the characters, and, inevitably, the author. This story reminds me that the little things do count. The fact that there are so many little things in a life sometimes causes us to discount their value, even to ourselves. The outcome of this story speaks to the improvement in the quality of life by simple gestures. In a day of increasing emphasis on minimalism to counteract the overwhelming influx of information, and the complexity of relationships, McCall Smith reminds us that everything that makes life bearable, and sometimes, enjoyable, comes back to personal growth and the values of kindness and doing what can be done by one.