The Last Light of the Sun

The Last Light of the Sun

by Guy Gavriel Kay

Paperback(Reprint)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780451459855
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 04/28/2005
Series: Northland Series
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 512
Sales rank: 352,254
Product dimensions: 5.80(w) x 8.80(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Guy Gavriel Kay is the international bestselling author of numerous fantasy novels including The Fionavar Tapestry trilogy, Tigana, The Last Light of the Sun, Under HeavenRiver of Stars, and Children of Earth and Sky. He has been awarded the International Goliardos Prize for his work in the literature of the fantastic, and won the World Fantasy Award for Ysabel in 2008. In 2014 he was named to the Order of Canada, the country’s highest civilian honor. His works have been translated into more than twenty-five languages.

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Last Light of the Sun 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 44 reviews.
Ronin27 More than 1 year ago
I read "Under Heaven" by Kay and was simply amazed by the writing, characters, and setting... simply awed... could not buy another Kay book fast enough... "The Last Light of The Sun" reads in a very clunky, unpolished manner... shallow characters... does not seem like same writer...
Jeffrey Lambert More than 1 year ago
Although this book doesn't hold a candle to Kay's 'Lions of al-Rassan' it is still a very good book. Kay does a particularly good job creating a world that mirrors the history of European kingdoms and their struggles with the Norsemen of the age.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been a huge fan of Guy Gavriel Kay since the first time I read Tigana, after which I scoured bookstores to find anything else he'd written. I must agree with one of the other reviewers, in that I was disappointed. The poetry of his other works is missing and I wasn't as drawn in they way I have been with his other works. While I don't regret buying this book, I don't think it will win him many new loyal readers. If you're already a fan, I'm sure you'll read it anyway. If someone else recommended that you read Kay, start with any of this other novels and come back to this one once you're hooked. I would hate for anyone to start with this one and miss out on his other works.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My copies of Kay¿s works are well-worn, well-read, and well-loved. 'The Last Light of the Sun' takes its place upon my shelf, but I do not feel as much affection for it as I do for his other works. The story is well told, the phrasing is flawless, and it is certainly enjoyable to read, but there is a certain flatness, a missing spark of magic that runs through most of his works. For lovers of Historical Fantasy, this is a must-read. For lovers of Kay¿s work, enjoy, but don¿t expect it to resonate as much as his other works.
TadAD on LibraryThing 3 months ago
What can I say, an exceptionally good book by an author who is consistently good. There's a lot of depth to each of the characters and a wonderful story.
ShelfMonkey on LibraryThing 3 months ago
The talent of fantasy writing can be a tricky thing. When it works, the reader effortlessly suspends disbelief, joyously transported to worlds of magic and power. Seasoned travelers through these realms include C.S. Lewis, Charles de Lint, Clive Barker, and, of course, J.R.R. Tolkien.When it doesn¿t work, as is far too often the case, it is all so many water nymphs and ogres trudging through the ink, making a cheap buck though series such as Forgotten Realms and Dungeons & Dragons, the over-praised work of Robert Jordan, and others too tawdry to mention.Guy Gavriel Kay knows how to make it work. Highly regarded in the field as a master of fanciful storytelling with a deep interest in historical accuracy, the Canadian author has earned comparisons with both Lewis and Tolkien, even collaborating with Christopher Tolkien on the posthumous publication of his father¿s The Silmarillion.Now, decades after the release of his seminal work The Fionavar Tapestry (recently released in a 20th anniversary edition), Kay has decided to depart slightly from his oeuvre, concentrating instead on a historical fiction with muted elements of the fantastic. The change does him good; The Last Light of the Sun ranks as one of his finest.Last Light is set firmly in the Norse and Celtic traditions of the north, in a time where ¿axe and sword were perfectly good responses to treachery.¿ In a land balanced on the razor¿s edge of change, the peoples of the Anglcyn and the Cyngael live in a precarious form of peace, each struggling to prosper under the constant threat of murderous raids by the Erlings.Into this rich world Kay introduces a host of fascinating characters. Bern Einarson is a man new to the fraternity of mercenaries, while his absent father Thorkell has been taken prisoner. King Aeldred of the Anglcyn fights to keep his people free and thriving, while Ceinion, high cleric of the Cyngael, yearns to bring stability to a universe of fairy worship and an apocalyptic religious faith of giant serpents and world trees.With all due respect to J.R.R. Tolkien, Kay is by far the better writer. His atmospheric worlds equal Tolkien¿s Middle-Earth in complexity and wonderment, while his grasp of character development and dialogue far outpace the master¿s.Part of the gratification of well-designed fantasy is searching for significant parallels in the world beyond the page. Like the best of fantasy, analogous elements to Last Light¿s feudal world can be found in today¿s uneven mixture of political instability, religious factionalism, and cultural intolerance. Yet Kay is wise enough never to write his fables as polemic; they function equally as amusement and as social criticism, content to let the readers unwrap as many layers and motifs as they deem fit.The Last Light of the Sun is exhilarating entertainment, a bold trek to a land where one¿s finest wish is to die on one¿s feet. Kay, now a fantasy veteran, is a maestro of ¿the dance, the thrust and twist of words, of meanings half-shown and then hidden, that underlay all the great songs and deeds of courts.¿ The Last Light of the Sun, a taut and gripping novel, is a first-rate work, by any standard.
MuseofIre on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Set in the same universe as his The Lions of Al-Rassan and The Sarantine Mosaic, this tale of conflict and change among the Anglo-Saxon, Celtic, and Viking cultures has all of Kay's virtues in spades: the elegant prose, the effortless command of historical detail, the elegaic tone, the knack for making people come alive on the page in just a few lines. But it also has his flaws: the way he doesn't really know what to do with his characters once they're all set in motion, the lack of a satisfying ending. Kay especially indulges in too many literary tricks here, too many "had he but known what was going to happen, would he ever" set-ups, too many "oh, life is full of tragedies that stem from seemingly trivial choices" asides, too many "marginal character witnesses significant event" distractions. Though all beautifully depicted, there are too many characters, so that inevitably some get neglected. The three pairings ("romances" would be too positive a word) are so scantly written that none of them are really plausible.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As usual, Mr Kay's prose is beautiful. But the plotting was tough to follow. He's got a lot of threads running through this weaving. And the individual stories are at least interesting, and some quite moving. And by the end, he manages to tie most if them up, some more satisfactorily than others, notably that of the two princes, Dai and Alun. But the story feels somewhat disjointed. A map would have gone a long way towards helping me to hold onto the various threads, and it is a curious abscence, as all of Kay's other works include maps. And this book seems to take place in the same setting, separated by centuries, as several of his other works. Worth reading if you are looking to immerse yourself completely in his world to better appreciate other books, such as The Lions of Al Rassan, or the Sarantine Mosaic duology.
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Looked up at the Imperator.
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Sighs and looks over at a bush. Sees blue eyes and pads over,curious
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Watch in the shadows
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