The Last Picture Show

The Last Picture Show

by Larry McMurtry
3.3 31

Paperback(Reprint)

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Overview

The Last Picture Show by Larry McMurtry

It was Sam the Lion, the rough-edged yet protective old sentimentalist who gave Thalia its poolhall, its all-night cafe, and, most cherished in the reverie of the town's restless youth, its own picture show. Set in the north-central Texas of the late 1950s, THE LAST PICTURE SHOW is an unforgettable novel of youth and dreams, and of harsh, dry reality.

Later made into an award-winning motion picture, THE LAST PICTURE SHOW demonstrates Larry McMurtry's talents as a writer and observer.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780684853864
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Publication date: 01/14/1999
Series: Thalia Trilogy Series , #1
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 288
Product dimensions: 5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Born and raised in Texas, Larry McMurtry is an award-winning novelist, essayist, Oscar-winning screenwriter, and avid book collector. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of
Endearment, and Lonesome Dove. He lives in Archer City, Texas.

Hometown:

Archer City, Texas

Date of Birth:

June 3, 1936

Place of Birth:

Wichita Falls, Texas

Education:

B.A., North Texas State University, 1958; M.A., Rice University, 1960. Also studied at Stanford University.

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The Last Picture Show 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 32 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
¿The Last Picture Show¿ by Larry McMurtry is about a sixteen-year-old boy, Sonny Crawford, set in the 1950¿s. Sonny and his best friend Duane live in Thalia, Texas, a very small, boring town; and they just try to find fun wherever they can. They have a lot of exciting, adolescent adventures together; but when life and other distractions get in their path, it leaves both of them feeling very lonely and depressed. The author, Larry McMurtry, is an outstanding author. He did an awesome job at portraying the theme which is terrible things can happen to anyone. Sonny and his best friend go through many hardships such as friends dying, things changing, and them being loyal to each other. The characters in the book are very realistic which always makes a book better.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am giving this book 3 stars because I reserve 4 stars for great books and 5 stars for perfect books. Having grown up in Texas, I expected McMurtry to more fully capture the sweet nostalgia of southern adolescence. The book is character-driven, yet somehow lacks the degree of emotion that would have made it truly great. Also, there's a whole lotta' sex, and a lot of it is not 'sexy' sex (if you've read this, I'm talking about the cow scene and the Mexico scene). The characters are basal and, for the most part, one dimensional. I realize I'm knocking what many consider a fine American novel but after hearing my professors sing the praises of the great Larry McMurtry, I was a bit let down. If you read this book, please don't assume that Texas really is a vast wasteland of tiny towns populated by bored teenagers with a penchant for blind heiffers.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Larry McMurtry¿s ¿The Last Picture Show¿ as a novel is admittedly autobiographical and the characters he introduces us to, he later admitted, are also based (loosely, he says!) on real people. This is the story of vibrant young people in the not-so-vibrant West Texas town of Thalia. A true coming-of-age and rites of passage story, we find Duane Moore, pal Sonny, and girlfriend Jacy at true crossroads of life. They are ready to enter adulthood but they are stuck literally in the middle of nowhere, a dying, last of the old timer-towns in dusty West Texas. But as Grace Metalious earlier showed us that beneath the surface of a small town lies a much more involved--even disgusting--involvement and the secrets that lie there do not need to be uncovered. Uncovered they are, of course, as McMurtry--perhaps on a personal mission of his own--is not content to live with the status quo. He takes the ennui of everyday life in a small town and, after careful study, surgically exposes them, for better or for worse. This is not a ¿they lived happily ever after¿ accounting. It is a tumbleweed infested, drought eroded, down-and-out account of the lives of his protagonist, who find (but they¿ve never really expected anything more) that the world is not lit by candlelight, but by lighting, as Tennesse Williams wrote. They view--but never understand--the mysteries of sex and of love. With McMurtry¿s sometimes not so subtle humor, these realities are somewhat softened. But it is this exposure to the realities of life--its disappointments and depressions--that carries ¿The Last Picture Show.¿
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
suzanne-genevieve More than 1 year ago
This book was excellent. Wonderful character studies and a touching story of the death of small towns in America.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved it
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good novel, interesting character development. Ulike other McMurtry books. A good read that holds one's interest. Ending was a bit abrupt, but didn't detract from the story.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was interesting and focused on many different aspects of teenage life in a rural area in Texas. The story was stuffed with sexual content throught the entire piece. It was great reading and had marvelous descriptions of characters, especially the main character McMurtry made feel like you really knew him in every day life, Sonny. He was the life of the story. Ruth the coaches wife and Sonny's love affiar partner with a need for something eventful to happen in her life, Duane and his love for Jacy, Jacy and her love for Bobby sheen and popularity. This book was a little twisted view on teenage life. Altogether I belive Larry McMurtry did an excellent job on his discription and metaphors. I would recommend this book for a few laughs and for people whom enjoy reading about everyday life. Life that isn't jam packed with.cell phones, Television and the internet. When the hobbies included hanging around the poolhall and socializing at the drive-in-(also for people who don't mind blunt sexual content and undertones).