The Last Place on Earth

The Last Place on Earth

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Last Place on Earth 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow! What an adventure! I could hardly put the book down. Although this old woman was most of the time snuggled under covers with my cats, I felt like I was there - in the Antarctic getting frostbitten with the men. A story that is staying with me. It isn't exactly a book for animal lovers, but I suppose they needed to use the men and the animals as they did in order to accomplish their goals at the time. It's truly amazing what people have done in the past and what animals have been put through in the past, perhaps to accomplish personal goals of the leaders, but which in longlasting effect advances science and benefits the human condition. I'll be reading more of this author.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was difficult to put down. First of all - the story of Amundson's team's trek is unbelievable and very well written. A great read for people at many levels: those interested in the Antartica, history, exploring, business leadership and generally an interesting story. The book begins with the early life of Amundson, showing how he applied all of life's lessons to his magnificent, well planned trek to the South Pole. The writier moves back and forth between the lives of Amundson and Clark, for comparison of two very different types of explorers with different motivations. The story of Amundson's team in the Antartica and their journey is fascinating and could not be written better, had it been a novel - and this was true life. Bought this book as a present for my husband but could not hand it over until I finished it. Have since sent the book to various friends as presents.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book takes a thorough, uncompromising look at the race to the South Pole between Robert Scott and Roald Amundsen. I came to this book steeped in the myths surrounding Scott, a Royal Navy Captain whose rightful place of priority at the pole was usurped by the Norwegian Amundsen. Huntford strips away all the myths, exposing Scott as the bungler he was. For instance, Scott and his men stopped to collect fossils while they were on a desperate forced march to reach supplies. As it was, Scott and his men died 11 miles from a cache of food and fuel. Amundsen is shown to be a complex, difficult man, but a great explorer. This book is my favorite non-fiction book of all time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Excellent reading! Give it a four star after having read four chapters of the book. Then perhaps the stars of Antarctic couldn't possibly equate the natural honesty that flows when Huntford wrote this book. What makes this a great book is not about the grandeur of Antarctic or of the explorers, but how Huntford explored the explorers and the unexplored Antarctic. Huntford is brilliantly honest and enthralling. He is an excellent writer though not a perfect one but not as imperfect as Scott....
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have read and re-read Huntford's book (as well as most of his others, including 'Shackleton') and find it not only a meticulously detailed account of the two expeditions, but a textbook for critical thinking. Why do I say that? Look at Amundsen's careful, methodical preparation; his care for his men -- and even for his beloved dogs, which he grieved to sacrifice! -- and compare it with Scott's neurotic,, egotistical, ignorant Royal Mavy arrogance, which killed not only himself but the brave men who were so ill-advised as to follow him. For Scott, it was a way of gaining 'glory' by suffering. For Amaundsen, it was to get to the Pole first and bring his men home safely. I greatly admire Amundsen throughout his career, just as I much deplore the myth which has grown up around Scott on the basis of his self-pitying, self-serving diaries. Yes, the contrasting preparations for these two expeditions offer a textbook care of critical thinking vs. sloppy improvisation. The video was remarkably faithful to the book. Using real Norwegians was sheer genius.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Before you embrace this book wholeheartedly, do some research on Huntford and see how much time he's spent in the Antarctic. Check out his biography and his credentials. As a much needed contrast to this decidedly slanted book (against Scott, who was not at all as bungling and self-serving as Huntford portrays him) read Race to the Pole by Ranulph Fiennes, a polar explorer in his own right. Huntford's book should not be swallowed without further research.