The Law and The Lady (Thriller Classic)

The Law and The Lady (Thriller Classic)

by Wilkie Collins

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Overview

The Law and the Lady is a detective story. Valeria Brinton marries Eustace Woodville despite objections from Woodville's family leading to disquiet for Valeria's own family and friends. Just a few days after the wedding, various incidents lead Valeria to suspect her husband is hiding a dark secret in his past. Wilkie Collins (1824 - 1889) was an English novelist, playwright, and author of short stories. His best-known works are The Woman in White, No Name, Armadale, and The Moonstone.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9788027331185
Publisher: e-artnow
Publication date: 04/15/2019
Pages: 228
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.48(d)

About the Author

Date of Birth:

December 8, 1824

Date of Death:

September 23, 1889

Place of Birth:

London, England

Place of Death:

London, England

Education:

Studied law at Lincoln¿s Inn, London

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The Law and the Lady: A Novel 2.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had to skip whole paragraphs but i couldnt put it down! I really like this story, i liked the twists and developement of the characters and to find out that i had guessed right over who done it :)
MariaAlhambra on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A delightftul Wilkie Collins mystery. It mingles the classical fairy tale motif of Bluebeard and the narrative schemes of detective fiction (hidden clues, reconstructed fragments) with Collins' usual adept characterization. There is a corageous, unsentimental heroine and a great gallery of eccentrics, of which the best is the disabled mad poet/genius Miserrimus Dexter. The resolution subverts the melodramatic crescendo of the the story and offers a realistic and melancholic conclusion to the mystery.
StoutHearted on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This novel would be tedious if not for the interesting side characters that seem almost shocking for the time in which it was written. The main character herself, Valeria, is a tad one-sided with her determined devotion to clear her husband's name no matter what. But we see her defy all conventions and friendly advice to do so, which is no small potatoes. Yet she is easily upstaged by the more flamboyant characters she runs into: Major Fitz-David, who with his charm and unabashed flirtations takes up all the space in whatever room he's in, and more so by Missimerimus Dexter, a sentimental, half-mad, legless man who is accompanied by his devoted but witless cousin/servant Ariel. The descriptions of the last two are often unkind, and they are immediately set apart as Others in the novel's world.Valeria's conundrum begins when she discovers her husband's deep, dark secret: He was once married before, and put on trial for the murder of his wife. The trial taking place in Scotland, her husband managed to be released under the stigma of the "not proven" verdict. While her husband runs away in agony over Valeria discovering his secret, the devoted wife soldiers on and is determined to uncover the truth about what happened to the first Mrs. McCallan so that she may clear her husband's name.It is easy to overlook the bravery and determination forged by Valeria when she is so blindly devoted to such an undeserving man as her husband. Her character does cry out for more depth, but this is compensated in part by the wildness of some of the other characters. Dexter is such a character that is not soon to be forgotten after his introduction, where he is racing wildly in circles around the room in his wheelchair, shouting nonsense. He is gothic and haunting, from the vivid descriptions of his macabre artwork, to the creepy way he hops about on his hands. Described as both man and monster, he never stands a chance for normalcy in his society, or in the novel. I don't think I've ever read a character quite like him.While not a stellar example of Collins's writing, it is a worthwhile read, especially for the fascinating characters.
Harrietbright on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A joy to read. Wonderful classic writing. Every word had its important place. Loved the storyline and found the characters fascinating.
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Could not read
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is riddled with errors. I could barely stand to read on page if it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There are too many errors in the book to make this an enjoyable read. That is a pity because this Collins is an enjoyable author.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a scanned document and is unreadable!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A simple spell check would fix most of the typos. If this is what Google does to books, I want no part of it. I was too busy deciphering the words to follow the story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The copy downloaded to my Nook had a lot of repeat sections. I had to keep fast forwarding through the pages to find where I should actually be to continue with the story. I liked the story but was frustrated with the parts that were repeated sometimes 6 or 7 times per section.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is this book good?