Learning Python

Learning Python

by Mark Lutz, David Ascher
3.3 21

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Overview

Learning Python by Mark Lutz, David Ascher

Portable, powerful, and a breeze to use, Python is the popular open source object-oriented programming language used for both standalone programs and scripting applications. Python is considered easy to learn, but there's no quicker way to mastery of the language than learning from an expert teacher. This edition of Learning Python puts you in the hands of two expert teachers, Mark Lutz and David Ascher, whose friendly, well-structured prose has guided many a programmer to proficiency with the language.

Learning Python, Second Edition, offers programmers a comprehensive learning tool for Python and object-oriented programming. Thoroughly updated for the numerous language and class presentation changes that have taken place since the release of the first edition in 1999, this guide introduces the basic elements of the latest release of Python 2.3 and covers new features, such as list comprehensions, nested scopes, and iterators/generators.

Beyond language features, this edition of Learning Python also includes new context for less-experienced programmers, including fresh overviews of object-oriented programming and dynamic typing, new discussions of program launch and configuration options, new coverage of documentation sources, and more. There are also new use cases throughout to make the application of language features more concrete.

The first part of Learning Python gives programmers all the information they'll need to understand and construct programs in the Python language, including types, operators, statements, classes, functions, modules and exceptions. The authors then present more advanced material, showing how Python performs common tasks by offering real applications and the libraries available for those applications. Each chapter ends with a series of exercises that will test your Python skills and measure your understanding.

Learning Python, Second Edition is a self-paced book that allows readers to focus on the core Python language in depth. As you work through the book, you'll gain a deep and complete understanding of the Python language that will help you to understand the larger application-level examples that you'll encounter on your own. If you're interested in learning Python--and want to do so quickly and efficiently--then Learning Python, Second Edition is your best choice.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780596551933
Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
Publication date: 12/23/2003
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 624
Sales rank: 342,556
File size: 4 MB

About the Author


Mark Lutz is a software developer and a Python writer and trainer. He is the author of Programming Python and Python Desktop Reference, both published by O'Reilly & Associates. Mark has programmed a variety of Python systems, teaches courses about Python, and has been involved with the Python community since 1992.

David Ascher is a hybrid scientist/software engineer/trainer. By day, he is a vision scientist; additionally, he spends a fair bit of his free time learning about computer science and teaching Python.

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Learning Python 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
sldonb42 More than 1 year ago
If you go to the page for the 4th edition and press the link to download a sample, you WILL get a sample for the 2nd edition...covering Python 2.3, not 2.6 and 3.1. The same if you buy it without rooting around through the editions listed as ebooks. B&N will then tell you that they do not issue refunds for ebooks.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its a freaking 4494 page sample totally get the free sample( this ' sample'includes all chaptets except the appendexs)very well written good for the begginnr and more experianced alike
Guest More than 1 year ago
It gives a thorough description of how to use Python; which is indeed easy to learn if you already know another language. But when the authors say that not having to compile Python programs means that development time is speeded up, perhaps they are overstating. For most programmers who use compiled languages like C or C++, the biggest time is taken up in finding a method that solves a problem, coding it and subsequent debugging. These days, compilers on recent hardware are fast enough that link/compile times are simply not a bottleneck to development productivity. So it is a bit of a straw dummy that the authors put forth. However, they are absolutely spot on when comparing this to Perl or Tcl. Perl is powerful, but its code looks like assembler. Perl gurus tend to shrug when you point this out, usually saying they understand it, with the not-so-implicit suggestion that if you can't, it is your fault. But this leads to a real maintenance problem and a barrier to entry to others. The cleaner Python syntax can show coding intent far clearer. Plus, and more importantly, the object oriented nature of Python lets you scale up to much larger programs. This has always been a problem with scripting languages, all the way back to the various unix shell scripts and DOS bat files. Often, the most those ever gave you in terms of modular capabilities was the equivalent of subroutines. Which is strictly procedural and not OO. By the way, there is a small contradiction between the above claim that Python is more understandable than Perl and the claim that it has an advantage over C++ or Java because it is not as verbose as those. Typically, in increasing amount of source code, you have Perl -> Python -> (C++,Java). If you think that Python is more understandable than Perl, then by that same logic, we could conclude that C++ or Java is more understandable than Python. So if you are using Perl or Tcl and want something better, Python is a good choice. A good upgrade path. But if you are currently using C or C++, with maybe X for graphics, or Java, then I suggest you stay with those. All three languages, with their graphics, give you a far richer toolset. Python would be a retrograde choice.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The sample gives no understanding of how this book will be teaching the language and is just about the history of python, its uses and the authors view on 2.x vs 3.x. Hard to tell what this book will be like as it gets very mixed reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Even the sample is very good.The very very good book for beginner.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Never give up.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent for beginner but still worthwhile for more advanced python programmer
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent book to teach yourself Python! I have the 4th edition. It focuses on Python 3.2 but explains the differences with Python 2.7 and earlier versions as those areas are encountered in the book. The book starts with the basics, which most will find very easy, and proceeds to the most advanced Python topics. Every chapter builds on what was taught in previous chapters. There are numerous WORKING examples throughout the book, and the author has a web site where you may down load all of the examples. I have Python 3.2 and 2.7 and have run most of the examples in both versions. This is an EXCELLENT book if you need, or just want to learn Python!
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