Learning to Walk in the Dark

Learning to Walk in the Dark

by Barbara Brown Taylor
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Overview

Learning to Walk in the Dark by Barbara Brown Taylor

From the New York Times bestselling author of An
Altar in the World
, Barbara
Brown Taylor’s Learning to Walk in the Dark provides a way to find spirituality in those times when we don’t have all the answers.

Taylor has become increasingly uncomfortable with our tendency to associate all that is good with lightness and all that is evil and dangerous with darkness. Doesn’t God work in the nighttime as well? In Learning to Walk in the Dark, Taylor asks us to put aside our fears and anxieties and to explore all that God has to teach us “in the dark.” She argues that we need to move away from our “solar spirituality” and ease our way into appreciating “lunar spirituality.” Through darkness we find courage, we understand the world in new ways, and we feel God’s presence around us, guiding us through things seen and unseen. Often, it is while we are in the dark that we grow the most.

With her characteristic charm and literary wisdom, Taylor is our guide through a spirituality of the nighttime, teaching us how to find our footing in times of uncertainty and giving us strength and hope to face all of life’s challenging moments.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781483003207
Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.
Publication date: 04/08/2014
Edition description: Unabridged
Sales rank: 1,032,451
Product dimensions: 5.30(w) x 5.80(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

Barbara Brown Taylor’s book Leaving Church was met with widespread critical acclaim,
including from the New York Times, USA Today, NPR’s Fresh
Air
, and others. Taylor spent fifteen years in parish ministry and was named one of the twelve most effective preachers in the English-speaking world by Baylor University in 1996. She became a professor of religion at Piedmont
College in 1998 and also teaches spirituality at Columbia Theological Seminary.
Still a priest in the Episcopal church, Taylor has traveled the world in pursuit of sacred wisdom, finding most of what she needed in her backyard. She lives on a working farm in rural north Georgia with her husband, Ed.

Barbara Brown Taylor’s book Leaving Church was met with widespread critical acclaim,
including from the New York Times, USA Today, NPR’s Fresh
Air
, and others. Taylor spent fifteen years in parish ministry and was named one of the twelve most effective preachers in the English-speaking world by Baylor University in 1996. She became a professor of religion at Piedmont
College in 1998 and also teaches spirituality at Columbia Theological Seminary.
Still a priest in the Episcopal church, Taylor has traveled the world in pursuit of sacred wisdom, finding most of what she needed in her backyard. She lives on a working farm in rural north Georgia with her husband, Ed.

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Learning to Walk in the Dark 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
KitCatCF More than 1 year ago
I found this book refreshing, inspiring, and comforting. The author's use of imagery of darkness, both physical and spiritual, opened up my mind, heart, and soul in a way that light never could. I loved it so much that I loaned it to my pastor as soon as I finished it. I want to read more by Barbara Brown Taylor.
YoyoMitch More than 1 year ago
Reading Rev. Taylor’s words is an opportunity to sit with a person who: witnesses life (including her own), allows the truth of what she sees to Be, is able to translate that witness into a coherent narrative, then speaks that truth to the heart of her present time.  If this sounds like a definition of a Prophet, it is both accurate and applicable to this bright, curious, brave, inviting and truth-telling Pastor whose parish has become those who inhabit her physical orbit or who read her words. To be more specific, Barbara Brown Taylor has lived enough life to no longer care about the “correct” answers, she is learning to sit with the questions as if they were teachers.  This book is the next installment of chronicles in her journey of her rediscovery of what it means to “believe.” In developing the structure of the work, Rev. Taylor follows a cycle of the moon, beginning and ending with that celestial body in its “full” phase.  She uses astronomy, theology, folklore, myth and an amazing number of other sources to explore “dark” and “darkness.” She speaks to the possibility that “Dark” has gotten an unearned reputation as the host and representative of evil. The book is an exploration of how that reputation has developed and looks deeply at the benefits of darkness. From the near darkness of a full moon to the absolute dark of a cave, she is able to “lead a discussion” of possible definition of darkness, how we are affected by that dark and that definition and allows space enough for the reader to “learn” how different the world is when there is less light in their world. There is so much richness to be found within this books’ pages that the reader needs to be careful not to read too much of it too quickly or find that they have too much to digest in one sitting. She asks the reader to consider their relationship with “darkness” in ways that lead to meaningful confrontation of one’s Self.  “. . . our comfort or discomfort with the outer dark is a good indicator of how we feel about the inner kind.” (p.60). “. . . it is sometimes hard to tell whether you are being killed or saved by the hands that turn your life upside down.” (p.67) “Sight and sound . . . . If I do not limit their access to me, I will grow such thick callouses that I am no longer capable of seeing or hearing things that really matter” (p.93). It bears being reminded that the author is speaking of learning to walk in the dark. The level of intimacy in this book is astonishing. I could find no instance of “other” language – each word was offered as if she and I were sharing a cup of tea, speaking of personal experiences so close and secret that they are recognized as treasures jointly discovered.  Her gift of taking such intimate material and making them immediate to the reader adds to the feeling of “shared moments” found regularly throughout the book. Her experiences became part of me as she spoke of family camping trips, spelunking adventures, reflections of life that too easily pass by. Such “present-ness” can (were) be too close, hence the need for frequent breaks for reflection and breathing. I will be reading this book for some time to come.  There is still so much I need to learn about walking in the dark.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed all the research that Barbara put into this book. Organ Cave walk was so interesting. It gave me a whole other perspective on being in the dark and darkness as opposed to being in the light. A welcome read. I had read Barbara's memoir, Leaving Church, which I liked very much. I would like to read her "An Altar in the World" next.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
In this book, Taylor talks about a wide variety of kinds of darkness and uses of the word darkness in perception, in psychology and in matters of faith and belief. With our excellent leader, a minister, we engaged in meaningful discussion of the book and of our own ideas, experiences, and beliefs as brought to mind by the book. The discussion was far more interesting and helpful to me than the book, but that discussion would not have happened if we had not read this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have been afraid of the dark until now. This book is a must read and a definite eye opener. I love this book. 
Library_ladyLNU More than 1 year ago
If you have ever been fearful of the dark or worried about what may be in the dark, Barbara Brown Taylor has written a book that is worth your time to read and ponder. She says that in this world of bright, shiny things, when sunny and radiant are the exemplars of what is good and “right,” we may well be overlooking an important alternate way to view the matter. Prof. Taylor points out that many of the most profound experiences that are presented in religion, literature and real life often occur in the dark—or at least what most of us think of as “the dark.” This is a work that is worthy of multiple readings both to savor the author’s glorious use of language and to contemplate the many profound thoughts that she offers. A useful Bibliography for further reading and study is presented at the end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love how Barbara Taylor talks about what she went through and how it is that you shouldn't be afraid of the dark. Very inspiring.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I learned that life is hard.
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