ISBN-10:
0495906336
ISBN-13:
2900495906338
Pub. Date:
01/01/2011
Publisher:
Cengage Learning
Least You Should Know about English: Writing Skills, Form A / Edition 11

Least You Should Know about English: Writing Skills, Form A / Edition 11

by Paige Wilson

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Overview

Least You Should Know about English: Writing Skills, Form A / Edition 11

Avoiding linguistic terminology, this textbook reviews the essentials of word choice and spelling, sentence structure, punctuation, capitalization, and the basic structure of a paragraph. Abundant exercises practice grammatical forms, writing sentences, and proofreading paragraphs. The ninth edition adds sections on adjectives and adverbs and comma rules. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Product Details

ISBN-13: 2900495906338
Publisher: Cengage Learning
Publication date: 01/01/2011
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 336
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

About the Author

With a gift for explaining the basics of grammar, punctuation, and writing, Paige Wilson, Associate Professor at Pasadena City College, brings the vital structures of English to life, reinforcing fundamental concepts with easy-to-follow exercises, samples, and writing assignments. Since joining Teresa Ferster Glazier as author of THE LEAST YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT ENGLISH in the 7th edition, Professor Wilson continues (in this 13th edition) to celebrate Glazier's original goal of providing students with 100% practical coverage and practice of writing skills — from word choice to fully developed essays — in one brief text. Through seven editions of her own, Wilson has added a fresh voice and global perspective to Glazier's vision along the way.

Table of Contents

1. SPELLING AND WORD CHOICE. What Is the Least You Should Know? How to Learn the Least You Should Know. The Importance of a Good Dictionary. Your Own List of Misspelled Words. Words That Can Be Broken into Parts. Guidelines for Doubling a Final Letter. Words Often Confused (Set 1). Words Often Confused (Set 2). The Eight Parts of Speech. Adjectives and Adverbs. Contractions. Possessives. 2. SENTENCE STRUCTURE. Finding Subjects and Verbs. Locating Prepositional Phrases. Understanding Dependent Clauses. Correcting Fragments. Correcting Run-on Sentences. Identifying Verb Phrases. Using Standard English Verbs. Using Regular and Irregular Verbs. Maintaining Subject-Verb Agreement. Avoiding Shifts in Time. Recognizing Verbal Phrases. Correcting Misplaced or Dangling Modifiers. Following Sentence Patterns. Avoiding Cliches, Awkward Phrasing, and Wordiness. Correcting for Parallel Structure. Using Pronouns. Avoiding Shifts in Person. 3. PUNCTUATION AND CAPITAL LETTERS. Period, Question Mark, Exclamation Point, Semicolon, Colon, Dash. Comma Rules 1, 2, and 3. Comma Rules 4, 5, and 6. Quotation Marks and Underlining/Italics. Capital Letters. 4. WRITING. What Is the Least You Should Know about Writing? Writing as Structure. First-Person and Third-Person Approaches. Basic Structures. I. The Paragraph: Defining a Paragraph. Types of Paragraphs. Sample Paragraphs in an Essay. Sample of a Single-Paragraph Assignment. II. The Essay: The Five-Paragraph Essay and Beyond. Defining an Essay. A Sample Essay. Writing Skills. III. Writing in Your Own Voice: Narration. A Sample Essay. Description. IV. Finding a Topic: Look to Your Interests. Focused Free Writing (or Brainstorming). Clustering. Talking with Other Students. V. Organizing Ideas: Thesis Statements. Organizing an Essay. Topic Sentences. Organizing Body Paragraphs (or Single Paragraphs). Transitional Expressions. VI. Supporting with Details: Types of Support. A Sample Final Draft. VII. Choosing and Using Quotations: Choosing Quotations. Using Quotations. Signal Phrases and Punctuation. A Sample Paragraph Using Quotations. Guidelines for Including Quotations. VIII. Writing an Argument: Taking a Stand and Proving Your Point. A Sample Argument. Three Requirements of a Strong Written Argument. Reading Longer, More Challenging Works. IX. Writing Summaries: A Sample Reading. A Sample Summary. Summary Checklist. X. Revising, Proofreading, and Presenting Your Work: A Sample Rough Draft. Revision Checklist. Exchanging Papers (Peer Evaluations), Proofreading Aloud. Presenting Your Work. Paper Formats. Titles. Answers. Index.

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